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Donors Like You

A Plan to Give Back

Ever since Duke Cancer Institute helped Meg Lindenberger survive breast cancer 10 years ago, she and her husband, Bill, have been faithful supporters. “The Bible tells us that what we own on earth doesn't really belong to us. We believe that,” Meg says. Duke also helped their daughter, Kim, through...

Creating Answers

Nancy Davenport-Ennis has survived cancer twice. One of her many strategies for thriving—look for ways to help others. That’s how, in 1996, Davenport-Ennis found herself in a 10 by 10 room in a warehouse with a rented desk and chair and a seven-year-old computer and printer. She had quit her job as...

Program For Young Adults With Cancer Gets A Boost

Teen and young adult cancer patients will receive expanded services at Duke, thanks to a $400,000 award from First Citizens Bank and Teen Cancer America. “Duke Cancer Institute, Teen Cancer America, and First Citizens Bank share a passion for helping teens and young adults facing cancer,” says...

Stopping A Stealth Disease

Survivors, family members, and researchers have been working together for more than a decade to detect ovarian cancer earlier and educate women about its signs.

In The Genes

You learn you have a genetic history of cancer. Now what? Noah Kauff, MD, is at the forefront of answering that question, especially for women's cancers.

Fall 2018 Breakthroughs Message From The Director

At Duke Cancer Institute, inspired by the bravery of our patients, we don’t shrink from even the most daunting challenges. We tackle them head-on.

#MyDukeCancerStory: A Labor of Love

Melanie Bacheler, at 32, was a full-time pharmaceutical company sales representative, part-time gymnastics coach, and a new mom of a six-month-old when her mother Gail Parkins was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian epithelial cancer. By the time her cancer was discovered, it had already advanced...

Stealing Time From Urologic Cancer

DAN GEORGE, MD, remem­bers one of the first times he helped someone live longer. He was treating a patient with metastatic kidney can­cer who enrolled in a clinical trial of a new drug and was one of the first people in the United States to receive it. “He could only tolerate the drug for about...

#MyDukeCancerStory: Devoted Mother Creates Meaning From Mourning

We all hope our lives will count—that in some way we will make an indelible mark within our circles, our society and, perhaps, even beyond. But what happens when a promising young life is snuffed out much too soon? For Mary Woodall the unimaginable loss of her son, Christopher "Chris" Cash, at just...

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