Program For Young Adults With Cancer Gets A Boost

ON HAND FOR THE CHECK PRESENTATION FROM FIRST CITIZENS BANK AND TEEN CANCER AMERICA: Jeff Ward, First Citizens Bank; Simon Davies, Teen Cancer America; DCI Executive Director Michael Kastan, MD, PhD; young adult cancer patient ShannonVoelkel; DCI Deputy Director Steven Patierno, PhD; Duke University President VincentPrice, PhD; and Nolan Smith, Duke men's basketball. (photo by Chris Hildreth/Rooster Media) ON HAND FOR THE CHECK PRESENTATION FROM FIRST CITIZENS BANK AND TEEN CANCER AMERICA: Jeff Ward, First Citizens Bank; Simon Davies, Teen Cancer America; DCI Executive Director Michael Kastan, MD, PhD; young adult cancer patient ShannonVoelkel; DCI Deputy Director Steven Patierno, PhD; Duke University President VincentPrice, PhD; and Nolan Smith, Duke men's basketball. (photo by Chris Hildreth/Rooster Media) Teen and young adult cancer patients will receive expanded services at Duke, thanks to a $400,000 award from First Citizens Bank and Teen Cancer America.

“Duke Cancer Institute, Teen Cancer America, and First Citizens Bank share a passion for helping teens and young adults facing cancer,” says Cheyenne Corbett, PhD, administrative director for Duke Cancer Institute’s Supportive Care and Survivorship Center and Center for Onco-Primary Care. “We recognize the unique medical, social, economic, and emotional needs of this vulnerable population.”

First Citizens and Teen Cancer America have pledged $400,000 to Duke’s Teen and Young Adult Oncology (TYAO) program. 

The award will support staffing for a medical family therapist, patient navigator, and psychologist. Funds will also support teen and young adult-focused activities and a patient-centered model of care.

This article appeared in the Spring 2019 issue of Breakthroughs, a magazine produced twice yearly by Duke Cancer Institute Office of Development. Subscribe to Breakthroughs.

CIRCLE PHOTO (TOP): Young adult cancer patient Shannon Voelkel and her mother, Mary. Voelkel is being treated at Duke for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. (photo by Chris Hildreth/Rooster Media)