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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Sara Wajda, Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

Ovarian Cancer Survivors and Families Help Advance Research

It’s been called the silent killer because it spreads fairly quietly, before causing painful symptoms. By the time many women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer, its already advanced through the abdominal cavity. This is what happened to Gail Parkins, who, at the age of 54, was eventually diagnosed...

Researchers ID Genes That Make Sarcomas Less Aggressive

Duke Cancer Institute and Rice University researchers have identified a network of regulatory genes (the microRNA-200 family, ZEB1, and GRHL2) they believe are driving some sarcomas toward a different cell lineage — a condition that seems to predict better patient outcomes. The culmination of a...

Duke Nurse Launches Album For A Cure Campaign

Music has always played an important role in Daniel Nickels’ life. Growing up in Ashland, Oregon, he was surrounded by musicians. His mother taught him to play piano when he was young. By sixteen his dad had Nickels shredding a guitar. He would go on to master other instruments, including the...

Leaders Make Collaboration Focus of Cancer Moonshot Summit

As a part of Vice President Joe Biden’s Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, DC last month, leaders from North Carolina’s three comprehensive cancer centers gathered at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to convene their own regional summit. “The goal of the ‘moonshot’ is to propel us...

Fluorescence Lights Up Hidden Cancer

Surgery is a crucial weapon against cancer. But cancer can evade it. A surgeon may think all the tumor has been removed, only to find out from pathology reports that some was left behind. That can mean a second surgery for the patient. Or, if microscopic cancer cells aren’t found by pathologists,...

Duke Breast Cancer Expert Named One of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People

Shelley Hwang, MD , chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute, has been named one of TIME’s 100 most influential people for 2016 as a pioneer in her field. One of the world’s foremost experts in early-stage breast cancers, Hwang has become an international leader calling for research to...

Hit Me With Your Best Shot

Duke Cancer Institute physician Brent Hanks, MD, PhD, is studying patient tumors to reveal the genetic changes that happen when melanomas win a battle and become resistant to immunotherapy treatments. In the last couple of years, patients with advanced melanoma have gained an ally in their fight...

The Double Agent Drug

Ines Batinic-Haberle and colleagues developed BMX-001 based on a discovery in a Duke basic research lab. The drug will first be tested in patients with brain cancer and head and neck cancer in clinical trials at Duke in 2016. Duke Cancer Institute member Ines Batinic-Haberle, PhD, holds a vial of...

Paul Modrich Shares Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Duke Cancer Institute member Paul Modrich, PhD, was awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Modrich is also a James B. Duke professor in the Department of Biochemistry at Duke University School of Medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He shares the prize with Aziz Sancar,...

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