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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Sara Wajda, Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

Brain Tumor Survivor Moms Are Angels Among Us

Behind every team photo and supportive hug at the annual Angels Among Us 5K and family fun run are stories of personal struggle and hope, love and new friendship. New teams form. Old ones dissolve. And some, persistent and resolute, stay in it for the long-haul. For a third year, two women, both of...

Victorious, Giving Back Seems Right For This Cancer Survivor

From cancer diagnosis, through treatment, recovery and survivorship, Ryan Switzer hasn’t stopped raising awareness and funds to ensure that others receive the same Duke quality cancer care that he and his family received Switzer was 37 in July 2012 when he was diagnosed with stage 2 rectal cancer...

Sustenance for the Cause

Durham chef Scott Howell has been throwing the annual "Nana's Dinner" to benefit the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program for so many years, he can’t quite remember how it got started. He recalls that one of his regular customers at Nana’s, his upscale restaurant near Duke University, asked him...

More Than Medicine

Retired from their careers as an electrical engineer and a registered nurse, Harold and Selma Lerner transplanted to Durham from their native Boston morethan 20 years ago. The Lerners live only an eight-minute ride from Duke, a choice that was a lifesaver when Harold had a stroke. Afterward, he was...

Triple Negative Breast Cancer Survivor Making Strides

Bonita Holliday-Guy was just kicking back watching TV one hot August night three years ago when she felt a small lump high up on her breast. She promptly had it checked out by her primary care physician who suspected a cyst and referred her for an ultrasound. A radiologist at Duke Raleigh Hospital...

Nationwide Ovarian Cancer Clinical Trial Shows Promise

When IBM IT architect Laura Elzie, 60, was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer three years ago by her long-time primary care physician she was momentarily stunned when she heard, “Some of us never know how we are going to leave this world, but at least you know.” For months she’d been told her pain...

Ovarian Cancer Survivors and Families Help Advance Research

It’s been called the silent killer because it spreads fairly quietly, before causing painful symptoms. By the time many women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer, its already advanced through the abdominal cavity. This is what happened to Gail Parkins, who, at the age of 54, was eventually diagnosed...

A Community of Supporters

On Valentine’s Day 2009, Meg Lindenberger was diagnosed with breast cancer. Throughout her treatment—a bilateral mastectomy and four rounds of chemotherapy—Duke surgeon Randall Scheri, MD, and his team ensured that Meg never endured nausea or missed a day of work at IBM. The day after her...

Houff Family Outraces Cancer

Quin Houff (pronounced “howf”) of Weyers Cave, Virginia, fell in love with racing at age eight, driving go-karts with his dad, Zane. “Our family has a trucking business, and they say driving is in our blood,” Quin says. By age nine, Quin was racing mini-cup cars (half-size stock cars). “I’m just...

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