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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Elisabeth Wharton, Assistant Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

Getting Real with Clinical Trials

Most studies of new treatments don't reflect the diversity of people in the real world. That's a problem. THE NEXT TIME YOU TAKE A MEDICATION, CONSIDER THIS: It’s available because it was shown to be safe and effective in clinical trials. In these controlled studies, researchers give a new...

Liquid Biopsies Smooth The Way For Personalized Medicine

What if just two vials of your blood could tell doctors which cancer treatment would work best for you? By design, some of the newest and most exciting cancer treatments don’t work for everybody. Instead, they target tumors that have a specific genetic mutation or characteristic. A treatment like...

Creating Answers

Nancy Davenport-Ennis has survived cancer twice. One of her many strategies for thriving—look for ways to help others. That’s how, in 1996, Davenport-Ennis found herself in a 10 by 10 room in a warehouse with a rented desk and chair and a seven-year-old computer and printer. She had quit her job as...

A Plan to Give Back

Ever since Duke Cancer Institute helped Meg Lindenberger survive breast cancer 10 years ago, she and her husband, Bill, have been faithful supporters. “The Bible tells us that what we own on earth doesn't really belong to us. We believe that,” Meg says. Duke also helped their daughter, Kim, through...

Cancer Prevention: Making It Easy Like Sunday Morning

GILDA SUITER, 54, OF DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA, struggled with gastroesophageal reflux disease, known as acid reflux, for several years. Two years ago, her doctor recommended that she take a urea breath test—a non-invasive diagnostic test to detect a common bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H...

Spring 2018 Breakthroughs Message From The Director

Ten years, twelve years, even more than two decades. That is how long some of Duke Cancer Institute’s patients with prostate and other urologic cancers are liv­ing past their diagnoses, thanks to a new generation of therapies and our physician-scientists’ willing­ness to leave no avenue unpursued...

Stealing Time From Urologic Cancer

DAN GEORGE, MD, remem­bers one of the first times he helped someone live longer. He was treating a patient with metastatic kidney can­cer who enrolled in a clinical trial of a new drug and was one of the first people in the United States to receive it. “He could only tolerate the drug for about...

The Bladder Guy

BRANT INMAN, MD, MS , is skilled at the major sur­geries that no one wants to be unlucky enough to have. “I’m the guy who when you’ve got a tumor this big, you call to take it out,” says Inman, holding his hands up in the shape of a grapefruit. “Yesterday I removed two bladders and replaced them.”...

Personal Attention

Five years after surgery to treat prostate cancer, STEELE DEWEY of Charlotte, North Carolina, was told in 2010 that the cancer had spread, so he and his wife, Molly, decided to seek advice at an academic medical center. They looked at a lot of options but chose Dan George, MD, at Duke because a...

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