Tomi Akinyemiju

Overview:

Area of Expertise: Epidemiology

Dr. Akinyemiju is a social and molecular cancer epidemiologist with expertise in epidemiologic methods, translational research, health disparities and global health.  Her research interests focus on identifying the impact of social (such as access to healthcare) and biological factors (such as metabolic dysregulation), on cancer related risk, tumor aggressiveness and survival. She has a specific interest in understanding the causes of cancer disparities among women of African descent in the US and sub-Saharan Africa, given their significantly higher risk of aggressive cancer subtypes relative to other racial groups. To achieve these research aims, she utilizes data from population-based cancer registries, administrative claims, and existing cohort studies. Dr. Akinyemiju also leads several primary epidemiologic research studies. She is the PI of a case-control study of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and healthy women in Nigeria designed to elucidate the impact of metabolic dysregulation, highly prevalent due to the epidemiologic transition, on hormone-receptor negative breast cancer subtypes and associated epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, Dr. Akinyemiju leads an R01 study designed to characterize racial differences across multiple healthcare access dimensions among US ovarian cancer patients, and evaluate the impact of differential healthcare on quality of initial and supportive treatment, and quality of life. A parallel line of research focuses on identifying lifestyle intervention strategies to improve metabolic health among breast cancer patients as a mortality prevention strategy. Dr. Akinyemiju is also passionate about promoting inclusion and diversity in research, teaching and service, and serves as the Director for Inclusion and Diversity at the Duke University Department of Population Health Sciences. 

Positions:

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Associate Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Instructor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Obstetrics and Gynecology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2012

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Grants:

A Role of Multilevel Healthcare Access Dimensions in Ovarian Cancer Disparities

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Metabolic Syndrome and Epigenetic Markers of Breast Cancer in Nigerian Women

Administered By
Duke Global Health Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Current smoking and quit-attempts among US adults following Medicaid expansion

© 2019 The Authors The objective of this study was to estimate the influence of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid Expansion on current smoking and quit attempts in expanded and non-expanded states. We analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) between 2003 through 2015 to evaluate changes in current smoking and quit attempts using multivariable logistic regression and generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for socioeconomic factors. Time periods evaluated were: 2003–2009 (pre-expansion) and 2011–2015 (post-expansion), and in supplemental analysis, also 2011–2017. Overall, smoking prevalence among adults in expanded and non-expanded states were 16% and 17% (p < 0.001), respectively, and quit attempt prevalence for expanded and non-expanded states were 56% and 57% (p = 0.05), respectively. In adjusted models comparing post- versus pre- expansion periods, current smoking declined by 6% in both expanded (RR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.93–0.94) and non-expanded (RR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.94–0.95) states. Quit attempts increased by 4% (RR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.04–1.05) in expanded states, and by 3% (RR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.02–1.03) in non-expanded states. States that imposed barriers to utilization of smoking cessation services e.g. prior authorization, saw only a 3% increase in quit attempts regardless of expansion status, while expanded states that did not impose barriers experienced a 6% (RR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.05–1.06) increase in quit attempts. Reducing administrative barriers to smoking cessation programs may enhance further declines in smoking rates among US adults.
Authors
Valvi, N; Vin-Raviv, N; Akinyemiju, T
MLA Citation
Valvi, N., et al. “Current smoking and quit-attempts among US adults following Medicaid expansion.” Preventive Medicine Reports, vol. 15, Sept. 2019. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100923.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402799
Source
scopus
Published In
Preventive Medicine Reports
Volume
15
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100923

Targeting risk factors for reducing the racially disparate burden in breast cancer.

African-American (AA) women are more likely to die from breast cancer (BC), at any age, compared to European-American women. Although breakthroughs in pre-clinical studies have resulted in potentially actionable targets in AA BC, drugs that were rationally designed for these targets have performed poorly in clinical trials. Challenges with interpatient and intratumoral heterogeneity, lack of drug sensitivity and specificity, suboptimal biomarker cut-offs, lack of drug response predictive biomarkers, drug side effects, high costs of drug development, and under-representation of AAs in clinical trials complicate the development of targeted therapies for AA BC patients. Accumulating evidence suggests that racial disparities exist in non-genetic risk factors that can alter genetic and epigenetic programs to promote breast tumorigenesis. Herein, we present a "roadmap" that addresses non-genetic risk factors that are suspected to contribute to the racial disparity in BC mortality. Increased targeting of these non-genetic risk factors may proffer a safer and more economical route to alleviating the racially disparate burden in BC.
Authors
Wright, N; Akinyemiju, T; Subhedar, P; Rida, P; Aneja, R
MLA Citation
Wright, Nikita, et al. “Targeting risk factors for reducing the racially disparate burden in breast cancer..” Front Biosci (Schol Ed), vol. 11, Mar. 2019, pp. 136–60.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1373083
PMID
30844741
Source
pubmed
Published In
Front Biosci (Schol Ed)
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
136
End Page
160

Mapping hot spots of breast cancer mortality in the United States: place matters for Blacks and Hispanics.

PURPOSE: The goals of this study were to identify geographic and racial/ethnic variation in breast cancer mortality, and evaluate whether observed geographic differences are explained by county-level characteristics. METHODS: We analyzed data on breast cancer deaths among women in 3,108 contiguous United States (US) counties from years 2000 through 2015. We applied novel geospatial methods and identified hot spot counties based on breast cancer mortality rates. We assessed differences in county-level characteristics between hot spot and other counties using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Spearman correlation, and stratified all analysis by race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Among all women, 80 of 3,108 (2.57%) contiguous US counties were deemed hot spots for breast cancer mortality with the majority located in the southern region of the US (72.50%, p value < 0.001). In race/ethnicity-specific analyses, 119 (3.83%) hot spot counties were identified for NH-Black women, with the majority being located in southern states (98.32%, p value < 0.001). Among Hispanic women, there were 83 (2.67%) hot spot counties and the majority was located in the southwest region of the US (southern = 61.45%, western = 33.73%, p value < 0.001). We did not observe definitive geographic patterns in breast cancer mortality for NH-White women. Hot spot counties were more likely to have residents with lower education, lower household income, higher unemployment rates, higher uninsured population, and higher proportion indicating cost as a barrier to medical care. CONCLUSIONS: We observed geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in breast cancer mortality: NH-Black and Hispanic breast cancer deaths were more concentrated in southern, lower SES counties.
Authors
Moore, JX; Royston, KJ; Langston, ME; Griffin, R; Hidalgo, B; Wang, HE; Colditz, G; Akinyemiju, T
MLA Citation
Moore, Justin Xavier, et al. “Mapping hot spots of breast cancer mortality in the United States: place matters for Blacks and Hispanics..” Cancer Causes Control, vol. 29, no. 8, Aug. 2018, pp. 737–50. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10552-018-1051-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1369762
PMID
29922896
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Causes Control
Volume
29
Published Date
Start Page
737
End Page
750
DOI
10.1007/s10552-018-1051-y

The Burden of Primary Liver Cancer and Underlying Etiologies From 1990 to 2015 at the Global, Regional, and National Level: Results From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

Authors
Global Burden of Disease Liver Cancer Collaboration,; Akinyemiju, T; Abera, S; Ahmed, M; Alam, N; Alemayohu, MA; Allen, C; Al-Raddadi, R; Alvis-Guzman, N; Amoako, Y; Artaman, A; Ayele, TA; Barac, A; Bensenor, I; Berhane, A; Bhutta, Z; Castillo-Rivas, J; Chitheer, A; Choi, J-Y; Cowie, B; Dandona, L; Dandona, R; Dey, S; Dicker, D; Phuc, H; Ekwueme, DU; Zaki, MES; Fischer, F; Fürst, T; Hancock, J; Hay, SI; Hotez, P; Jee, SH; Kasaeian, A; Khader, Y; Khang, Y-H; Kumar, A; Kutz, M; Larson, H; Lopez, A; Lunevicius, R; Malekzadeh, R; McAlinden, C; Meier, T; Mendoza, W; Mokdad, A; Moradi-Lakeh, M; Nagel, G; Nguyen, Q; Nguyen, G; Ogbo, F; Patton, G; Pereira, DM; Pourmalek, F; Qorbani, M; Radfar, A; Roshandel, G; Salomon, JA; Sanabria, J; Sartorius, B; Satpathy, M; Sawhney, M; Sepanlou, S; Shackelford, K; Shore, H; Sun, J; Mengistu, DT; Topór-Mądry, R; Tran, B; Ukwaja, KN; Vlassov, V; Vollset, SE; Vos, T; Wakayo, T; Weiderpass, E; Werdecker, A; Yonemoto, N; Younis, M; Yu, C; Zaidi, Z; Zhu, L; Murray, CJL; Naghavi, M; Fitzmaurice, C
MLA Citation
Global Burden of Disease Liver Cancer Collaboration, Christina, et al. “The Burden of Primary Liver Cancer and Underlying Etiologies From 1990 to 2015 at the Global, Regional, and National Level: Results From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015..” Jama Oncol, vol. 3, no. 12, Dec. 2017, pp. 1683–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2017.3055.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1369769
PMID
28983565
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Oncol
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
1683
End Page
1691
DOI
10.1001/jamaoncol.2017.3055

Drug-Eluting Balloon Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stent for Restenosis in a Bare-Metal Stent: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

Authors
Akinjero, AM; Adegbala, O; Akinyemiju, T
MLA Citation
Akinjero, Akintunde M., et al. “Drug-Eluting Balloon Versus Everolimus-Eluting Stent for Restenosis in a Bare-Metal Stent: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.” Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, vol. 37, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2017.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1369792
Source
wos
Published In
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume
37
Published Date

Research Areas:

Cancer
Epidemiology
Epigenetics
Global health
Health Disparities
Molecular Epidemiology
Social Determinants of Health