Nancy Andrews

Positions:

Nanaline H. Duke Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Dean Emerita of the School of Medicine

School of Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1980

Yale University

M.S. 1980

Yale University

Ph.D. 1985

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

M.D. 1987

Harvard University

Grants:

Bridging the Gap to Enhance Clinical Research Program (BIGGER)

Administered By
Medicine, Infectious Diseases
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

School of Medicine 2017 Biddle

Administered By
School of Medicine
Awarded By
Mary Duke Biddle Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Expansion of Animal Resources for Large Animals (Vivarium Expansion project)

Administered By
School of Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genes that modify Iron loading in mice

Administered By
Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Novel Genes That Modulate Systemic Iron Homeostasis

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Noncanonical role of transferrin receptor 1 is essential for intestinal homeostasis.

Transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) facilitates cellular iron uptake through receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-loaded transferrin. It is expressed in the intestinal epithelium but not involved in dietary iron absorption. To investigate its role, we inactivated the Tfr1 gene selectively in murine intestinal epithelial cells. The mutant mice had severe disruption of the epithelial barrier and early death. There was impaired proliferation of intestinal epithelial cell progenitors, aberrant lipid handling, increased mRNA expression of stem cell markers, and striking induction of many genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Administration of parenteral iron did not improve the phenotype. Surprisingly, however, enforced expression of a mutant allele of Tfr1 that is unable to serve as a receptor for iron-loaded transferrin appeared to fully rescue most animals. Our results implicate Tfr1 in homeostatic maintenance of the intestinal epithelium, acting through a role that is independent of its iron-uptake function.
Authors
Chen, AC; Donovan, A; Ned-Sykes, R; Andrews, NC
MLA Citation
Chen, Alan C., et al. “Noncanonical role of transferrin receptor 1 is essential for intestinal homeostasis..” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, vol. 112, no. 37, Sept. 2015, pp. 11714–19. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.1511701112.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1087748
PMID
26324903
Source
pubmed
Published In
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume
112
Published Date
Start Page
11714
End Page
11719
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1511701112

An iron-clad role for proteasomal degradation.

Authors
MLA Citation
Andrews, Nancy C. “An iron-clad role for proteasomal degradation..” Cell Metab, vol. 14, no. 3, Sept. 2011, pp. 281–82. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2011.08.001.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub757603
PMID
21907132
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell Metab
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
281
End Page
282
DOI
10.1016/j.cmet.2011.08.001

Tmprss6 Is a Genetic Modifier of the Hfe-Hemochromatosis Phenotype in Mice

Authors
Finberg, KE; Whittlesey, R; Fleming, MD; Andrews, NC
MLA Citation
Finberg, Karin E., et al. “Tmprss6 Is a Genetic Modifier of the Hfe-Hemochromatosis Phenotype in Mice.” Blood, vol. 114, no. 22, AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, 2009, pp. 259–259.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub861004
Source
wos
Published In
Blood
Volume
114
Published Date
Start Page
259
End Page
259

The function of heme-regulated eIF2alpha kinase in murine iron homeostasis and macrophage maturation.

Heme-regulated eIF2alpha kinase (HRI) plays an essential protective role in anemias of iron deficiency, erythroid protoporphyria, and beta-thalassemia. In this study, we report that HRI protein is present in murine macrophages, albeit at a lower level than in erythroid precursors. Hri-/- mice exhibited impaired macrophage maturation and a weaker antiinflammatory response with reduced cytokine production upon LPS challenge. The level of production of hepcidin, an important player in the pathogenesis of the anemia of inflammation, was significantly decreased in Hri-/- mice, accompanied by decreased splenic macrophage iron content and increased serum iron content. Hepcidin expression was also significantly lower, with a concomitant increase in serum iron in Hri-/- mice upon LPS treatment. We also demonstrated an impairment of erythrophagocytosis by Hri-/- macrophages both in vitro and in vivo under chronic hemolytic anemia, providing evidence for the role of HRI in recycling iron from senescent red blood cells. This work demonstrates that HRI deficiency attenuates hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis in mice, indicating a potential role for HRI in the anemia of inflammation.
Authors
Liu, S; Suragani, RNVS; Wang, F; Han, A; Zhao, W; Andrews, NC; Chen, J-J
MLA Citation
Liu, Sijin, et al. “The function of heme-regulated eIF2alpha kinase in murine iron homeostasis and macrophage maturation..” J Clin Invest, vol. 117, no. 11, Nov. 2007, pp. 3296–305. Pubmed, doi:10.1172/JCI32084.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub757629
PMID
17932563
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume
117
Published Date
Start Page
3296
End Page
3305
DOI
10.1172/JCI32084

The ins and outs of iron homeostasis.

Iron is an essential element that is toxic when it accumulates in excess. Intricate regulatory mechanisms have evolved to maintain iron homeostasis within cells and between different tissues of complex organisms. This review discusses the proteins involved in iron transport and storage and their regulation in health and disease.
Authors
Donovan, A; Roy, CN; Andrews, NC
MLA Citation
Donovan, Adriana, et al. “The ins and outs of iron homeostasis..” Physiology (Bethesda), vol. 21, Apr. 2006, pp. 115–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1152/physiol.00052.2005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub757643
PMID
16565477
Source
pubmed
Published In
Physiology (Bethesda, Md.)
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
115
End Page
123
DOI
10.1152/physiol.00052.2005