David Ashley

Overview:

Dr. Ashley's primary research focus is laboratory based, investigating the role of immunotherapy as a novel approach to the treatment of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Since beginning his appointment at the faculty level at Duke in August of 1995 his activities have centered on two main areas of investigation. The first involves both in vivo and in vitro studies of the use of molecular therapeutics to target a CNS tumor associated antigen. The second area of interest comprises a detailed analysis of the role of TGF beta, a protein messenger produced by tumors of the CNS, both in the pathogenesis of disease and as a possible target for immunotherapy.

In addition to his laboratory role Dr. Ashley is involved in the design and application of a variety of clinical research protocols in the treatment of children with malignant brain tumors.

Positions:

Rory David Deutsch Distinguished Professor of Neuro-Oncology

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor in Pediatrics

Pediatrics, Neurology
School of Medicine

Professor in Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

F.R.A.C.P. 1993

Royal Australasian College of Physicians (Australia)

M.B.B.S. 1994

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Ph.D. 1998

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Grants:

LGG-14C03: A Phase III study comparing two carboplatin containing regimens for children and young adults with previously untreated low grade glioma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SJMB12: A Clinical and Molecular Risk-Directed Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Medulloblastoma

Administered By
Pediatrics, Hematology-Oncology
Awarded By
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

NEWLY DIAGNOSED CHILDREN (LESS THAN 10 YEARS OLD) WITH MEDULLOBLASTOMA AND OTHER CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMPRIMITIVE NEURO-ECTODERMAL TUMORS:CLINICAL AND MOLECULAR RISK-TAILORED INTENSIVE AND COMPRESSED INDUCTION CHEMOTHERAPY FOLLOWED BY CONSOLIDATION WI

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Collaborative Network for Neuroooncology Clinical Trials (CONNECT)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Management of glioblastoma: State of the art and future directions.

Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Overall, the prognosis for patients with this disease is poor, with a median survival of <2 years. There is a slight predominance in males, and incidence increases with age. The standard approach to therapy in the newly diagnosed setting includes surgery followed by concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide and further adjuvant temozolomide. Tumor-treating fields, delivering low-intensity alternating electric fields, can also be given concurrently with adjuvant temozolomide. At recurrence, there is no standard of care; however, surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapy with chemotherapy or bevacizumab are all potential options, depending on the patient's circumstances. Supportive and palliative care remain important considerations throughout the disease course in the multimodality approach to management. The recently revised classification of glioblastoma based on molecular profiling, notably isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status, is a result of enhanced understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of disease. There is a clear need for better therapeutic options, and there have been substantial efforts exploring immunotherapy and precision oncology approaches. In contrast to other solid tumors, however, biological factors, such as the blood-brain barrier and the unique tumor and immune microenvironment, represent significant challenges in the development of novel therapies. Innovative clinical trial designs with biomarker-enrichment strategies are needed to ultimately improve the outcome of patients with glioblastoma.
Authors
Tan, AC; Ashley, DM; López, GY; Malinzak, M; Friedman, HS; Khasraw, M
MLA Citation
Tan, Aaron C., et al. “Management of glioblastoma: State of the art and future directions.Ca Cancer J Clin, vol. 70, no. 4, July 2020, pp. 299–312. Pubmed, doi:10.3322/caac.21613.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446606
PMID
32478924
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ca: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Volume
70
Published Date
Start Page
299
End Page
312
DOI
10.3322/caac.21613

The integrated genomic and epigenomic landscape of brainstem glioma.

Brainstem gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that encompass both benign tumors cured with surgical resection and highly lethal cancers with no efficacious therapies. We perform a comprehensive study incorporating epigenetic and genomic analyses on a large cohort of brainstem gliomas, including Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas. Here we report, from DNA methylation data, distinct clusters termed H3-Pons, H3-Medulla, IDH, and PA-like, each associated with unique genomic and clinical profiles. The majority of tumors within H3-Pons and-H3-Medulla harbors H3F3A mutations but shows distinct methylation patterns that correlate with anatomical localization within the pons or medulla, respectively. Clinical data show significantly different overall survival between these clusters, and pathway analysis demonstrates different oncogenic mechanisms in these samples. Our findings indicate that the integration of genetic and epigenetic data can facilitate better understanding of brainstem gliomagenesis and classification, and guide future studies for the development of novel treatments for this disease.
Authors
Chen, LH; Pan, C; Diplas, BH; Xu, C; Hansen, LJ; Wu, Y; Chen, X; Geng, Y; Sun, T; Sun, Y; Zhang, P; Wu, Z; Zhang, J; Li, D; Zhang, Y; Wu, W; Wang, Y; Li, G; Yang, J; Wang, X; Xu, C; Wang, S; Waitkus, MS; He, Y; McLendon, RE; Ashley, DM; Yan, H; Zhang, L
MLA Citation
Chen, Lee H., et al. “The integrated genomic and epigenomic landscape of brainstem glioma.Nat Commun, vol. 11, no. 1, June 2020, p. 3077. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16682-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1447966
PMID
32555164
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nature Communications
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
3077
DOI
10.1038/s41467-020-16682-y

CHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT-TERM SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

Authors
Barbour, A; Healy, P; Lipp, E; Herndon, J; Thomas, L; Johnson, M; Ashley, D; Desjardins, A; Randazzo, D; Friedman, H; Kirkpatrick, J; Peters, K
MLA Citation
Barbour, Andrew, et al. “CHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT-TERM SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS.” Neuro Oncology, vol. 21, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. 116–116.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432794
Source
wos
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
116
End Page
116

PILOT STUDY OF A SURGERY AND CHEMOTHERAPY-ONLY APPROACH IN THE UPFRONT THERAPY OF CHILDREN WITH WNT-POSITIVE STANDARD RISK MEDULLOBLASTOMA

Authors
Cohen, K; Bandopadhayay, P; Chi, S; London, W; Rodriguez, F; Hawkins, C; Yang, E; Aguilera, D; Castellino, R; MacDonald, T; Stapleton, S; Ashley, D
MLA Citation
Cohen, Kenneth, et al. “PILOT STUDY OF A SURGERY AND CHEMOTHERAPY-ONLY APPROACH IN THE UPFRONT THERAPY OF CHILDREN WITH WNT-POSITIVE STANDARD RISK MEDULLOBLASTOMA.” Neuro Oncology, vol. 21, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. 110–110.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439473
Source
wos
Published In
Neuro Oncology
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
110
End Page
110

MULTIDISCIPLINARY MEETINGS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

Authors
Pitson, G; Matheson, L; Garrard, B; Maher, B; Cowdery, S; Luo, W; Reed, M; Riches, S; Ashley, D; Rogers, MJ
MLA Citation
Pitson, Graham, et al. “MULTIDISCIPLINARY MEETINGS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER.” Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 12, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016, pp. 144–144.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439407
Source
wos
Published In
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
12
Published Date
Start Page
144
End Page
144