Nadine Barrett

Overview:

Dr, Nadine J. Barrett is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Duke University. She currently hold senior leadership roles as CTSI Co-Director for Equity and Stakeholder Strategy and the Inaugural Director of The Center for Equity in Research in the Duke Clinical Translational Science Institute, and Associate Director for Equity and Stakeholder Strategy, Duke Cancer Institute. A medical sociologist by training, Dr. Barrett is a health disparities researcher, expert equity strategist, and a nationally-recognized leader in facilitating community/stakeholder and academic partnerships to advance health equity and developing training and methods to address implicit bias and structural and systemic racism that limits diverse participation in biomedical research. Her goals are to integrate diverse stakeholder engagement in the research process and healthcare systems, enhance enrollment and retention of underrepresented groups in biomedical research, increase diversity in the research workforce, and advance health equity. Prior to her current role, Dr. Barrett was the inaugural director of the Duke Cancer Institute’s Office of Health Equity, where for eight years she led a team to create a nationally awarded community engagement model to advance health equity, through patient navigation, nationally funded pipeline training programs for underrepresented race and ethnic groups, and authentic community partnerships to inform and drive research and quality healthcare as advisors, experts, and participants. Her leadership in both nonprofit and academia spans local, national, and international partnerships to better serve and engage historically marginalized and underserved populations.



Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2005

Texas Woman's University

Grants:

Just Ask - Increasing Diversity in Oncology Clinical Research and Trials An Institutional and Stakeholder Engagement Approach

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Initiative

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Lung Cancer Initiative of North Carolina
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Breast Cancer Awareness to Action Ambassador Program (BCAAAP)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Susan G Komen for the Cure
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

JAK-STAT Inhibition to Reduce Racial Disparities in Kidney Disease

Administered By
Duke Molecular Physiology Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Association of Smartphone Ownership and Internet Use With Markers of Health Literacy and Access: Cross-sectional Survey Study of Perspectives From Project PLACE (Population Level Approaches to Cancer Elimination).

BACKGROUND: Telehealth is an increasingly important component of health care delivery in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, well-documented disparities persist in the use of digital technologies. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe smartphone and internet use within a diverse sample, to assess the association of smartphone and internet use with markers of health literacy and health access, and to identify the mediating factors in these relationships. METHODS: Surveys were distributed to a targeted sample designed to oversample historically underserved communities from April 2017 to December 2017. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association of internet and smartphone use with outcomes describing health care access and markers of health literacy for the total cohort and after stratifying by personal history of cancer. Health care access was captured using multiple variables, including the ability to obtain medical care when needed. Markers of health literacy included self-reported confidence in obtaining health information. RESULTS: Of the 2149 participants, 1319 (61.38%) were women, 655 (30.48%) were non-Hispanic White, and 666 (30.99%) were non-Hispanic Black. The median age was 51 years (IQR 38-65). Most respondents reported using the internet (1921/2149, 89.39%) and owning a smartphone (1800/2149, 83.76%). Compared with the respondents with smartphone or internet access, those without smartphone or internet access were more likely to report that a doctor was their most recent source of health information (344/1800, 19.11% vs 116/349, 33.2% for smartphone and 380/1921, 19.78% vs 80/228, 35.1% for internet, respectively; both P<.001). Internet use was associated with having looked for information on health topics from any source (odds ratio [OR] 3.81, 95% CI 2.53-5.75) and confidence in obtaining health information when needed (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.00-3.34) compared with noninternet users. Smartphone owners had lower odds of being unable to obtain needed medical care (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.95) than nonsmartphone owners. Among participants with a prior history of cancer, smartphone ownership was significantly associated with higher odds of confidence in ability to obtain needed health information (OR 5.63, 95% CI 1.05-30.23) and lower odds of inability to obtain needed medical care (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.47), although these associations were not significant among participants without a prior history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We describe widespread use of digital technologies in a community-based cohort, although disparities persist. In this cohort, smartphone ownership was significantly associated with ability to obtain needed medical care, suggesting that the use of smartphone technology may play a role in increasing health care access. Similarly, major illnesses such as cancer have the potential to amplify health engagement. Finally, special emphasis must be placed on reaching patient populations with limited digital access, so these patients are not further disadvantaged in the new age of telehealth.
Authors
Oshima, SM; Tait, SD; Thomas, SM; Fayanju, OM; Ingraham, K; Barrett, NJ; Hwang, ES
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484559
PMID
34106076
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
e24947
DOI
10.2196/24947

An innovative educational program for addressing health disparities in translational cancer research.

North Carolina Central University (NCCU) and Duke Cancer Institute implemented an NCI-funded Translational Cancer Disparities Research Partnership to enhance translational cancer research, increase the pool of underrepresented racial and ethnic group (UREG) researchers in the translational and clinical research workforce, and equip UREG trainees with skills to increase diversity in clinical trials. The Cancer Research Education Program (C-REP) provided training for UREG graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at Duke and NCCU. An innovative component of C-REP is the Translational Immersion Experience (TIE), which enabled Scholars to gain knowledge across eight domains of clinical and translational research (clinical trials operations, data monitoring, regulatory affairs, UREG accrual, biobanking, community engagement, community outreach, and high-throughput drug screening). Program-specific evaluative metrics were created for three broad domains (clinical operations, basic science/lab research, and population-based science) and eight TIE domains. Two cohorts (n = 13) completed pre- and post-surveys to determine program impact and identify recommendations for program improvement. Scholars reported statistically significant gains in knowledge across three broad domains of biomedical research and seven distinct areas within TIE. Training in translational research incorporating immersions in clinical trials operation, biobanking, drug development, and community engagement adds value to career development of UREG researchers.
Authors
Oldham, CE; Gathings, MJ; Devi, GR; Patierno, SR; Williams, KP; Hough, HJ; Barrett, NJ
MLA Citation
Oldham, Carla E., et al. “An innovative educational program for addressing health disparities in translational cancer research.J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 5, no. 1, Nov. 2020, p. e65. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2020.555.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1481813
PMID
33948284
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
5
Published Date
Start Page
e65
DOI
10.1017/cts.2020.555

AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT 2020

Cancer health disparities are an enormous public health challenge in the United States. ` Racial and ethnic minority populations are among the U.S. population groups that have long experienced cancer health disparities. ` Many of the U.S. population groups that experience cancer health disparities are also experiencing disparities related to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. ` There has been progress in reducing cancer incidence and health disparities, as illustrated by the fact that disparities in the overall cancer death rates among racial and ethnic groups are less pronounced now than they have been in the past two decades. ` Striking disparities in exposure to preventable cancer risk factors, rates of cancer screening for early detection, receipt of standard of care cancer treatment, and the burden of adverse effects of cancer and cancer treatment persist for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved populations in the United States. ` Researchers have identified many factors that contribute to cancer health disparities and learned that these factors are complex and interrelated. ` Many studies and initiatives are beginning to provide deep insight into the biological and genetic factors that contribute to cancer health disparities. ` Enhancing diversity in the pool of trainees, researchers, and health care workers, and developing science-based public policies that advance cancer prevention and early detection for individuals, families, and communities will allow us to overcome cancer health disparities.
Authors
Carpten, J; Springfield, S; Foti, M
MLA Citation
Carpten, John, et al. “AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT 2020.” AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501185
Source
manual

Abstract A080: Rates of Invitation, participation, and willingness to engage in medical and clinical research: Findings from attendees at two gender-specific community-based screening programs

Authors
Ingraham, KL; Packenham, J; Harvey, D; Patierno, S; Barrett, NJ
MLA Citation
Ingraham, Kearston L., et al. “Abstract A080: Rates of Invitation, participation, and willingness to engage in medical and clinical research: Findings from attendees at two gender-specific community-based screening programs.” Poster Presentations  Proffered Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-a080.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467300
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Presentations Proffered Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-a080

Abstract IA18: North Carolina Central University and Duke Cancer Institute's collaborative cancer research and education program: Connecting cancer disparities translational research, clinical trials operations, and community engagement

Authors
Williams, KP; Barrett, NJ; Oldham, CE; Hough, H; Woodard, A; Freedman, J; Devi, GR; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Williams, Kevin P., et al. “Abstract IA18: North Carolina Central University and Duke Cancer Institute's collaborative cancer research and education program: Connecting cancer disparities translational research, clinical trials operations, and community engagement.” Oral Presentations  Invited Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-ia18.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467305
Source
crossref
Published In
Oral Presentations Invited Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-ia18