Georgia Beasley

Positions:

Associate Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 2001

Duke University

M.D. 2008

Duke University School of Medicine

M.H.S. 2012

Duke University

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Duke University

Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

Ohio State University

Grants:

A Phase I trial of PVSRIPO for Patients with Unresectable Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Istari Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Controlled, Phase 3 Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Melphalan/HDS Treatment in Patients with Hepatic-Dominant Ocular Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Delcath Systems, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Comprehensive immunologic profiling of the sentinel node to optimize care for patients with melanoma

Awarded By
Society of Surgical Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

OMS-I103 / PICSES

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
OncoSec Medical
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Replimune RPL-001-16

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Replimune Group, INC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

An Internally Validated Prognostic Risk-Score Model for Disease-Specific Survival in Clinical Stage I and II Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Background: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare cutaneous malignancy for which factors predictive of disease-specific survival (DSS) are poorly defined. Methods: Patients from six centers (2005–2020) with clinical stage I–II MCC who underwent sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy were included. Factors associated with DSS were identified using competing-risks regression analysis. Risk-score modeling was established using competing-risks regression on a training dataset and internally validated by point assignment to variables. Results: Of 604 patients, 474 (78.5%) and 128 (21.2%) patients had clinical stage I and II disease, respectively, and 189 (31.3%) had SLN metastases. The 5-year DSS rate was 81.8% with a median follow-up of 31 months. Prognostic factors associated with worse DSS included increasing age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, p = 0.046), male sex (HR 3.21, p = 0.021), immune compromise (HR 2.46, p = 0.013), presence of microsatellites (HR 2.65, p = 0.041), and regional nodal involvement (1 node: HR 2.48, p = 0.039; ≥2 nodes: HR 2.95, p = 0.026). An internally validated, risk-score model incorporating all of these factors was developed with good performance (AUC 0.738). Patients with ≤ 4.00 and > 4.00 points had 5-year DSS rates of 89.4% and 67.2%, respectively. Five-year DSS for pathologic stage I/II patients with > 4.00 points (n = 49) was 79.8% and for pathologic stage III patients with ≤ 4.00 points (n = 62) was 90.3%. Conclusions: A risk-score model, including patient and tumor factors, based on DSS improves prognostic assessment of patients with clinically localized MCC. This may inform surveillance strategies and patient selection for adjuvant therapy trials.
Authors
Shannon, AB; Straker, RJ; Carr, MJ; Sun, J; Landa, K; Baecher, K; Lynch, K; Bartels, HG; Panchaud, R; Keele, LJ; Lowe, MC; Slingluff, CL; Jameson, MJ; Tsai, KY; Faries, MB; Beasley, GM; Sondak, VK; Karakousis, GC; Zager, JS; Miura, JT
MLA Citation
Shannon, A. B., et al. “An Internally Validated Prognostic Risk-Score Model for Disease-Specific Survival in Clinical Stage I and II Merkel Cell Carcinoma.” Annals of Surgical Oncology, Jan. 2022. Scopus, doi:10.1245/s10434-022-12201-z.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1530181
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-022-12201-z

Melanoma trials that defined surgical management: Overview of trials that established NCCN margin guidelines.

Since the observation that clearance of all visible and microscopic tumors from cutaneous melanoma is critical to prevent a recurrence, wide surgical margins have been central to surgical dogma. In the last several decades, more conservative margin widths have been vigorously studied by surgical investigators to lessen wound complications, the need for reconstruction, and healthcare costs. This review summarizes surgeon-led clinical trials that define current guidelines and highlights the challenges to initiate and perform trials today.
Authors
Sharib, J; Slingluff, CL; Beasley, GM
MLA Citation
Sharib, Jeremy, et al. “Melanoma trials that defined surgical management: Overview of trials that established NCCN margin guidelines.J Surg Oncol, vol. 125, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 28–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/jso.26717.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503740
PMID
34897715
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Surg Oncol
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
28
End Page
33
DOI
10.1002/jso.26717

Diverse Racial and Ethnicd But Not Genderd Representation among Faculty Is Associated with Greater Student Diversity

Authors
Yu, AY; Iwai, Y; Thomas, SM; Beasley, GM; Sudan, R; Fayanju, OM
MLA Citation
Yu, Alice Y., et al. “Diverse Racial and Ethnicd But Not Genderd Representation among Faculty Is Associated with Greater Student Diversity.” Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 233, no. 5, 2021, pp. S215–S215.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502514
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
233
Published Date
Start Page
S215
End Page
S215

Complete Pathologic Response Predicts Disease-Free Survival for Melanoma Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy

Authors
Rhodin, KE; Gaughan, EM; Raman, V; Salama, AK; Hanks, BA; Shah, R; Tyler, DS; Jr, SCL; Beasley, GM
MLA Citation
Rhodin, Kristen E., et al. “Complete Pathologic Response Predicts Disease-Free Survival for Melanoma Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy.” Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 233, no. 5, 2021, pp. S246–S246.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503193
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume
233
Published Date
Start Page
S246
End Page
S246

Acral Lentiginous Melanoma: A United States Multi-Center Substage Survival Analysis.

BACKGROUND: Acral lentiginous melanoma is associated with worse survival than other subtypes of melanoma. Understanding prognostic factors for survival and recurrence can help better inform follow-up care. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinicopathologic features, melanoma-specific survival, and recurrence-free survival by substage in a large, multi-institutional cohort of primary acral lentiginous melanoma patients. METHODS: Retrospective review of the United States Melanoma Consortium database, a multi-center prospectively collected database of acral lentiginous melanoma patients treated between January 2000 and December 2017. RESULTS: Of the 433 primary acral lentiginous melanoma patients identified (median [range] age: 66 [8-97] years; 53% female, 83% white), 66% presented with stage 0-2 disease and the median time of follow-up for the 392 patients included in the survival analysis was 32.5 months (range: 0-259). The 5-year melanoma-specific survivals by stage were 0 = 100%, I = 93.8%, II = 76.2%, III = 63.4%, IIIA = 80.8%, and IV = 0%. Thicker Breslow depth ((HR) = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.05-1.21; P < .001)) and positive nodal status ((HR) = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.00-3.22; P = .050)) were independent prognostic factors for melanoma-specific survival. Breslow depth ((HR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.07-1.20; P < .001), and positive nodal status (HR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.38-3.80; P = .001) were also prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of patients, acral lentiginous melanoma was associated with poor outcomes even in early stage disease, consistent with prior reports. Stage IIB and IIC disease were associated with particularly low melanoma-specific and recurrence-free survival. This suggests that studies investigating adjuvant therapies in stage II patients may be especially valuable in acral lentiginous melanoma patients.
Authors
Kolla, AM; Vitiello, GA; Friedman, EB; Sun, J; Potdar, A; Daou, H; Farrow, NE; Farley, CR; Vetto, JT; Han, D; Tariq, M; Beasley, GM; Contreras, CM; Lowe, M; Zager, JS; Osman, I; Berman, RS; Liebman, TN; Stein, JA; Lee, AY
MLA Citation
Kolla, Avani M., et al. “Acral Lentiginous Melanoma: A United States Multi-Center Substage Survival Analysis.Cancer Control, vol. 28, Jan. 2021, p. 10732748211053568. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/10732748211053567.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502005
PMID
34752172
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Control
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
10732748211053567
DOI
10.1177/10732748211053567