Jeffrey Crawford

Overview:

1. Lung cancer/new treatment approaches.
2. Clinical trials of hematopoietic growth factors, biological agents and targeted drug development.
3. Cancer in the elderly and supportive care

Accomplishments

1. Lead Investigator of the U. S. multicenter, randomized trial of Filgrastim (G-CSF, Neupogen) to reduce the morbidity of chemotherapy-related neutropenia, leading to FDA approval 2/91.
2. Lead Investigator of the U. S. multicenter, randomized trial of Vinorelbine (Navelbine) in treatment of patients with advanced non small cell carcinoma of lung (NSCLC), leading to FDA approval 12/94.
3. Principal Investigator in initial phase I clinical trials of stem cell factor (SCF), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), pegylated granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and other novel hematopoietic growth factors.

Positions:

George Barth Geller Distinguished Professor

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1974

Ohio State University

Grants:

BR.31

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

HELSINN - ANAM-17-21

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A phase II, Open-label, single-arm study to assess the safety and efficacy of AZD9291 in patients with locally advanced/

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase II anetumab ravtansine as 2nd line treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

EMD Serono, Inc. Education Event

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Third CECOG consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

The current third consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) builds upon and updates similar publications on the subject by the Central European Cooperative Oncology Group (CECOG), which has published such consensus statements in the years 2002 and 2005 (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer-update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137). The principle of all CECOG consensus is such that evidence-based recommendations for state-of-the-art treatment are given upon which all participants and authors of the manuscript have to agree (Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). This is of particular importance in diseases in which treatment options depend on very particular clinical and biologic variables (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer-update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137; Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). Since the publication of the last CECOG consensus on the medical treatment of NSCLC, a series of diagnostic tools for the characterization of biomarkers for personalized therapy for NSCLC as well as therapeutic options including adjuvant treatment, targeted therapy, and maintenance treatment have emerged and strongly influenced the field. Thus, the present third consensus was generated that not only readdresses previous disease-related issues but also expands toward recent developments in the management of NSCLC. It is the aim of the present consensus to summarize minimal quality-oriented requirements for individual patients with NSCLC in its various stages based upon levels of evidence in the light of a rapidly expanding array of individual therapeutic options.
Authors
Brodowicz, T; Ciuleanu, T; Crawford, J; Filipits, M; Fischer, JR; Georgoulias, V; Gridelli, C; Hirsch, FR; Jassem, J; Kosmidis, P; Krzakowski, M; Manegold, C; Pujol, JL; Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Vansteenkiste, J; Minichsdorfer, C; Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Zielinski, CC; Central European Cooperative Oncology Group (CECOG),
MLA Citation
Brodowicz, T., et al. “Third CECOG consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.Ann Oncol, vol. 23, no. 5, May 2012, pp. 1223–29. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdr381.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431764
PMID
32018580
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
1223
End Page
1229
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdr381

Therapeutic outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer with BRAF mutations: a single institution, retrospective cohort study.

Background: Data describing therapeutic outcomes in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with BRAF mutations remains limited. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 31 patients with metastatic NSCLC treated at Duke University Hospital who had been identified by next-generation sequencing methods to bear a BRAF mutation in their tumor in order to evaluate clinical response to immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Results: Sixty-five percent of patients identified in this cohort were current or former smokers. Fourteen (45.2%) of patients had a BRAF V600E mutation and 17 (54.8%) had a non-V600E mutation. Median progression-free survival (PFS) in the 23 patients who received first-line chemotherapy was 6.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3 to 13.0]. Overall survival (OS) in patients who received first-line chemotherapy showed a median survival of 18 months (95% CI, 7.4 to 28.6). OS comparing patients who had never received immunotherapy at any point was 18.4 months (95% CI, 4.1 to NE) compared to 19.0 months (95% CI, 9.9 to 28.6) in those who had received immunotherapy. We did not find a statistically significant difference in OS in patients with BRAF V600E, BRAF amplification, or non-V600E mutations. There was also no difference in OS in patients treated with targeted BRAF inhibitors compared to those who were not treated with targeted BRAF inhibitors. Conclusions: We describe therapeutic outcomes for patients with metastatic NSCLC with BRAF mutations treated with either cytotoxic chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Although the sample size is small, the survival curves do not suggest improved clinical activity in this population when treated with immunotherapy.
Authors
Tan, I; Stinchcombe, TE; Ready, NE; Crawford, J; Datto, MB; Nagy, RJ; Lanman, RB; Gu, L; Clarke, JM
MLA Citation
Tan, Irena, et al. “Therapeutic outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer with BRAF mutations: a single institution, retrospective cohort study.Transl Lung Cancer Res, vol. 8, no. 3, June 2019, pp. 258–67. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/tlcr.2019.04.03.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1397860
PMID
31367539
Source
pubmed
Published In
Translational Lung Cancer Research
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
258
End Page
267
DOI
10.21037/tlcr.2019.04.03

A systematic literature review of the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of filgrastim.

PURPOSE: Filgrastim (NEUPOGEN®) is the originator recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor widely used for preventing neutropenia-related infections and mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells. This report presents findings of a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of efficacy and safety of originator filgrastim to update previous reports. METHODS: A literature search of electronic databases, congress abstracts, and bibliographies of recent reviews was conducted to identify English-language reports of clinical trials and observational studies evaluating filgrastim in its US-approved indications up to February 2015. Two independent reviewers assessed titles/abstracts and full texts of publications, and extracted data from studies that compared originator filgrastim vs placebo or no treatment. For outcomes with sufficient homogeneous data reported across studies, meta-analysis was performed and relative risk (RR) determined. Data were summarized descriptively for all other evaluated outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 1194 unique articles evaluating originator filgrastim were identified, with 25 meeting eligibility criteria for data extraction: 18 randomized controlled trials, 2 nonrandomized clinical trials, and 5 observational studies. In chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), filgrastim vs placebo or no treatment significantly reduced febrile neutropenia incidence (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.53-0.75) and grade 3 or 4 neutropenia incidence (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.37-0.68). The most commonly reported adverse event (AE) with filgrastim was bone pain (RR 2.61, 95% CI 1.29-5.27 in CIN). Additional efficacy and safety outcomes are described within indications. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic literature review and meta-analysis confirms and updates previous reports on the efficacy and safety of originator filgrastim. Bone pain was the commonly reported AE associated with filgrastim use.
Authors
Dale, DC; Crawford, J; Klippel, Z; Reiner, M; Osslund, T; Fan, E; Morrow, PK; Allcott, K; Lyman, GH
MLA Citation
Dale, David C., et al. “A systematic literature review of the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of filgrastim.Support Care Cancer, vol. 26, no. 1, Jan. 2018, pp. 7–20. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-017-3854-x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1277738
PMID
28939926
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
7
End Page
20
DOI
10.1007/s00520-017-3854-x

Registry for the EVolution Of LUng Cancer Therapy Implementation and Outcomes Now (REVOLUTION): Registry Study in Progress

Authors
Kim, E; Dinan, M; Islam, KMM; Fernandes, A; Schwartzberg, L; Croft, E; Brahmer, J; Mansfield, A; Hyslop, T; Burke, L; Crawford, J
MLA Citation
Kim, Edward, et al. “Registry for the EVolution Of LUng Cancer Therapy Implementation and Outcomes Now (REVOLUTION): Registry Study in Progress.” Journal of Thoracic Oncology, vol. 11, no. 11, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016, pp. S308–09.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1311394
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
S308
End Page
S309

PCI Survival Improvement for Extensive Stage SCLC Limited to Patients on Maintenance Systemic Therapy: A Secondary Analysis of CALGB 30504

Authors
Salama, JK; Gu, L; Wang, X; Bogart, J; Crawford, J; Schild, S; Ready, N; Vokes, E
MLA Citation
Salama, Joseph K., et al. “PCI Survival Improvement for Extensive Stage SCLC Limited to Patients on Maintenance Systemic Therapy: A Secondary Analysis of CALGB 30504.” Journal of Thoracic Oncology, vol. 10, no. 9, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, Sept. 2015, pp. S401–S401.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1127520
Source
wos
Published In
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
S401
End Page
S401