James Davis

Overview:

Dr. James Davis is a practicing physician of Internal Medicine, and serves as the Medical Director for Duke Center for Smoking Cessation, Director of the Duke Smoking Cessation Program and Co-Director of the Duke-UNC Tobacco Treatment Specialist Credentialing Program.  His research focuses on development of new pharmaceutical treatments for smoking cessation.  He is principal investigator on several trials including a study on “adaptive” smoking cessation and several trials on new medications for smoking cessation. The new medications leverage more novel neurobiological mechanisms - NMDA receptor antagonism, nicotinic receptor antagonism, which impact addiction-based learning and cue response. Additionally, Dr. Davis serves as co-investigator on trials on lung cancer screening, e-cigarettes, minor nicotine alkaloids, imaging trials, lung function trials and others. Dr. Davis leads the Duke Smoke-Free Policy Initiative, is co-author on a national  tobacco dependence treatment guideline, and provides training in tobacco dependence treatment for the Duke School of Medicine, Duke Internal Medicine, Family Practice and Psychiatry residency programs. 

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1997

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency

Mayo Clinic

Grants:

Pfizer Preceptorship

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate the Impact of AXS-05 on Smoking Behavior.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Davis Tobacco-Free Generation Campus initiative Grant

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Innovations to Increase Utilization of a Smoking Cessation Program ¿ A Retrospective Review

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Correction to: The Effect of Brief Mindfulness Training on Brain Reactivity to Food Cues During Nicotine Withdrawal: A Pilot Functional Imaging Study (Mindfulness, (2019), 10, 11, (2272-2276), 10.1007/s12671-019-01201-y)

© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. The original publication is missing the following funding statement. “The study was funded by NIDA grant number P50DA027840”.
Authors
Kragel, EA; Sweitzer, MM; Davis, JM
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1416910
Source
scopus
Published In
Mindfulness
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
2480
DOI
10.1007/s12671-019-01245-0

Combination Lorcaserin and Nicotine Patch for Smoking Cessation Without Weight Gain.

INTRODUCTION: This study explored the efficacy of combination lorcaserin and nicotine patch for smoking cessation treatment and prevention of postsmoking cessation weight gain. METHODS: We conducted a trial in which 61 adult daily smokers were asked to quit smoking using a combination of lorcaserin and nicotine patch. During the first 2 weeks of treatment prior to the quit day, participants were randomized to receive either lorcaserin (10 mg twice daily) plus nicotine patch (21 mg) or placebo plus nicotine patch (21 mg). Following this 2-week period, participants received both medications for 12 weeks. Outcomes included 4-week continuous smoking abstinence at the end of treatment (weeks 7-10 postquit attempt), weight change, ad libitum smoking, withdrawal symptoms, and ratings of cigarette reward. RESULTS: Biochemically confirmed continuous smoking abstinence from 7 to 10 weeks postquit attempt was 31.1% (90% confidence interval, 21.4%-40.8%). Participants who quit smoking showed no weight gain; in fact, mean weight change was minus 0.16 kg (SD = 3.27) over the study period. There was an unexpected but strong association (p = .006) between a decrease in sensory enjoyment of smoking and successful quit outcome on this regimen. During the prequit randomization period, lorcaserin versus placebo reduced the impact of smoking to relieve craving for cigarettes as well as the sensory enjoyment of smoking (p = .005). Adherence and tolerability to lorcaserin and nicotine patch was good. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of lorcaserin and nicotine patch was well tolerated, associated with a relatively high smoking abstinence rate, and effectively prevented weight gain associated with quitting smoking. IMPLICATIONS: This report provides an important contribution to the literature because it details evidence of a medication combination-lorcaserin and nicotine-that is effective for smoking cessation and for ameliorating weight gain associated with smoking cessation. For many smokers, postcessation weight gain is a major obstacle to quitting, and this medication combination provides a suitable treatment option for these smokers. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02906644.
Authors
Rose, JE; Davis, JM
MLA Citation
Rose, Jed E., and James M. Davis. “Combination Lorcaserin and Nicotine Patch for Smoking Cessation Without Weight Gain..” Nicotine Tob Res, Oct. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ntr/ntz149.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415243
PMID
31589323
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nicotine Tob Res
Published Date
DOI
10.1093/ntr/ntz149

Combination of varenicline and nicotine patch for smoking cessation: A case report

© 2019 The Authors. Clinical Case Reports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Standard pharmacotherapy approaches to treat tobacco use may be ineffective in people with high nicotine dependence. Individuals with high nicotine dependence may be good candidates for a new treatment approach—combination of varenicline and nicotine patch.
Authors
Young, KM; Davis, JM
MLA Citation
Young, K. M., and J. M. Davis. “Combination of varenicline and nicotine patch for smoking cessation: A case report.” Clinical Case Reports, vol. 7, no. 9, Sept. 2019, pp. 1670–72. Scopus, doi:10.1002/ccr3.2332.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1403971
Source
scopus
Published In
Clinical Case Reports
Volume
7
Published Date
Start Page
1670
End Page
1672
DOI
10.1002/ccr3.2332

The Effect of Brief Mindfulness Training on Brain Reactivity to Food Cues During Nicotine Withdrawal: A Pilot Functional Imaging Study

© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Objectives: Many individuals who smoke relapse due to weight gain. Mindfulness training has been shown to help smokers quit smoking and, in other populations, has been used to help people lose weight. This study was designed to assess the effect of 1 week of mindfulness practice on food cravings in smokers during 12-hour smoking abstinence. Methods: We assessed daily smokers with a history of smoking lapse after weight gain. Participants were provided with brief training in mindfulness meditation and mindful eating and were asked to practice each skill daily for 1 week. Before and after this week of mindfulness practice, participants completed surveys to rate their nicotine dependence and food cravings and underwent testing via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Study results included pre–post intervention reduction in brain activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, visual areas, and premotor areas, regions potentially associated with response to food images. Conclusions: The study was small; however, it suggests the possibility that mindfulness training might be used to decrease food cravings after smoking cessation.
Authors
Kragel, EA; Sweitzer, MM; Davis, JM
MLA Citation
Kragel, E. A., et al. “The Effect of Brief Mindfulness Training on Brain Reactivity to Food Cues During Nicotine Withdrawal: A Pilot Functional Imaging Study.” Mindfulness, vol. 10, no. 11, Nov. 2019, pp. 2272–76. Scopus, doi:10.1007/s12671-019-01201-y.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398254
Source
scopus
Published In
Mindfulness
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
2272
End Page
2276
DOI
10.1007/s12671-019-01201-y

Optimizing Clinical Trial Enrollment Methods Through "Goal Programming"

Authors
Davis, JM
MLA Citation
Davis, J. M. “Optimizing Clinical Trial Enrollment Methods Through "Goal Programming".” Applied Clinical Trials: Your Peer Reviewed Guide to Global Clinical Trials Management, HHS author manuscripts, pp. 46–50.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1122463
Source
manual
Published In
Applied Clinical Trials: Your Peer Reviewed Guide to Global Clinical Trials Management
Start Page
46
End Page
50

Research Areas:

Education
Mindfulness (Psychology)
Nicotine addiction
Oral medication
Research
Smoking Cessation