Susan Dent

Overview:

Medical Oncologist with a focus on breast cancer
Associate Director of Breast Cancer Clinical Research
Co-Director Duke Cardio-Oncology Program

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1990

McMaster University (Canada)

Internal Medicine

Royal College of Physicians (United Kingdom)

Medical Oncology

Royal College of Physicians (United Kingdom)

Grants:

CardiovAscular Risk profile and Treatment patterns in ER+HER2 - Advanced Breast Cancer: A retrospective cohort study (CAREB)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASEIB/III STUDY OF IPATASERTIB PLUS PALBOCICLIB AND FULVESTRANT VERSUS PLACEBO PLUS PALBOCICLIB AND FULVESTRANT IN HORMONE RECEPTOR POSITIVE AND HER2 NEGATIVE LOCALLY ADVANCED UNRESECTABLE OR METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Cardiovascular Toxicity of Novel HER2-Targeted Therapies in the Treatment of Breast Cancer.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: HER2-targeted therapies have led to improved clinical outcomes in early and advanced breast cancer (BC). We review the long-term cardiotoxicity of HER2-targeted therapy in early and advanced BC, our current knowledge of cardiotoxicity of novel HER2-targeted therapies, and propose a cardiac monitoring (CM) strategy for this population. RECENT FINDINGS: Long-term data from studies with HER2-targeted therapy in the adjuvant setting have failed to demonstrate an increase in cardiotoxicity over time, and rates of cardiotoxicity seen with novel HER2 agents remain low. Despite over a decade of experience with HER2-targeted therapy, CM in clinical practice is inconsistent in patients with early BC and almost non-existent in advanced BC. Long-term follow-up of clinical trials with HER2-targeted agents in early and advanced BC has failed to demonstrate increased rates of cardiotoxicity over time, attesting to the long-term safety of this class of drugs for the majority of patients, although the long-term cardiac safety of newer HER2 agents in the non-clinical trial setting is largely unknown. We propose CM incorporating clinical history, cardiac imaging, and biomarkers.
Authors
Dent, SF; Morse, A; Burnette, S; Guha, A; Moore, H
MLA Citation
Dent, Susan F., et al. “Cardiovascular Toxicity of Novel HER2-Targeted Therapies in the Treatment of Breast Cancer.Curr Oncol Rep, vol. 23, no. 11, Aug. 2021, p. 128. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11912-021-01114-x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1495121
PMID
34453232
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Oncology Reports
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
128
DOI
10.1007/s11912-021-01114-x

Recognition, Prevention, and Management of Arrhythmias and Autonomic Disorders in Cardio-Oncology: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

With the advent of novel cancer therapeutics and improved screening, more patients are surviving a cancer diagnosis or living longer with advanced disease. Many of these treatments have associated cardiovascular toxicities that can manifest in both an acute and a delayed fashion. Arrhythmias are an increasingly identified complication with unique management challenges in the cancer population. The purpose of this scientific statement is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding arrhythmia identification and treatment in patients with cancer. Atrial tachyarrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, are most common, but ventricular arrhythmias, including those related to treatment-induced QT prolongation, and bradyarrhythmias can also occur. Despite increased recognition, dedicated prospective studies evaluating true incidence are lacking. Moreover, few studies have addressed appropriate prevention and treatment strategies. As such, this scientific statement serves to mobilize the cardio-oncology, electrophysiology, and oncology communities to develop clinical and scientific collaborations that will improve the care of patients with cancer who have arrhythmias.
Authors
Fradley, MG; Beckie, TM; Brown, SA; Cheng, RK; Dent, SF; Nohria, A; Patton, KK; Singh, JP; Olshansky, B
MLA Citation
Fradley, Michael G., et al. “Recognition, Prevention, and Management of Arrhythmias and Autonomic Disorders in Cardio-Oncology: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.Circulation, vol. 144, no. 3, July 2021, pp. e41–55. Pubmed, doi:10.1161/CIR.0000000000000986.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1490006
PMID
34134525
Source
pubmed
Published In
Circulation
Volume
144
Published Date
Start Page
e41
End Page
e55
DOI
10.1161/CIR.0000000000000986

Abstract P5-14-11: Cardiac monitoring in advanced breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: Does it improve cardiac safety?

Authors
Rushton-Marovac, MK; Lima, I; Tuna, M; Melloni, C; Pritchard, K; Hawken, S; Dent, SF
MLA Citation
Rushton-Marovac, Moira K., et al. “Abstract P5-14-11: Cardiac monitoring in advanced breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: Does it improve cardiac safety?Poster Session Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-11.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1442702
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Session Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-11

Abstract P5-14-18: Cardioprotective therapy in breast cancer patients with subclinical and clinical cardiotoxicty

Authors
Dent, SF; Steen, H; Montenbruck, M; Esch, S; Wulfing, P; Janson, K; Lenihan, D
MLA Citation
Dent, Susan Faye, et al. “Abstract P5-14-18: Cardioprotective therapy in breast cancer patients with subclinical and clinical cardiotoxicty.” Poster Session Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-18.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1442703
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Session Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs19-p5-14-18

Management of cardiac disease in cancer patients throughout oncological treatment: ESMO consensus recommendations.

Cancer and cardiovascular (CV) disease are the most prevalent diseases in the developed world. Evidence increasingly shows that these conditions are interlinked through common risk factors, coincident in an ageing population, and are connected biologically through some deleterious effects of anticancer treatment on CV health. Anticancer therapies can cause a wide spectrum of short- and long-term cardiotoxic effects. An explosion of novel cancer therapies has revolutionised this field and dramatically altered cancer prognosis. Nevertheless, these new therapies have introduced unexpected CV complications beyond heart failure. Common CV toxicities related to cancer therapy are defined, along with suggested strategies for prevention, detection and treatment. This ESMO consensus article proposes to define CV toxicities related to cancer or its therapies and provide guidance regarding prevention, screening, monitoring and treatment of CV toxicity. The majority of anticancer therapies are associated with some CV toxicity, ranging from asymptomatic and transient to more clinically significant and long-lasting cardiac events. It is critical however, that concerns about potential CV damage resulting from anticancer therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits of cancer therapy, including benefits in overall survival. CV disease in patients with cancer is complex and treatment needs to be individualised. The scope of cardio-oncology is wide and includes prevention, detection, monitoring and treatment of CV toxicity related to cancer therapy, and also ensuring the safe development of future novel cancer treatments that minimise the impact on CV health. It is anticipated that the management strategies discussed herein will be suitable for the majority of patients. Nonetheless, the clinical judgment of physicians remains extremely important; hence, when using these best clinical practices to inform treatment options and decisions, practitioners should also consider the individual circumstances of their patients on a case-by-case basis.
Authors
Curigliano, G; Lenihan, D; Fradley, M; Ganatra, S; Barac, A; Blaes, A; Herrmann, J; Porter, C; Lyon, AR; Lancellotti, P; Patel, A; DeCara, J; Mitchell, J; Harrison, E; Moslehi, J; Witteles, R; Calabro, MG; Orecchia, R; de Azambuja, E; Zamorano, JL; Krone, R; Iakobishvili, Z; Carver, J; Armenian, S; Ky, B; Cardinale, D; Cipolla, CM; Dent, S; Jordan, K; ESMO Guidelines Committee. Electronic address: clinicalguidelines@esmo.org,
MLA Citation
Curigliano, G., et al. “Management of cardiac disease in cancer patients throughout oncological treatment: ESMO consensus recommendations.Ann Oncol, vol. 31, no. 2, Feb. 2020, pp. 171–90. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.annonc.2019.10.023.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427925
PMID
31959335
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
31
Published Date
Start Page
171
End Page
190
DOI
10.1016/j.annonc.2019.10.023