Laura Fish

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Prevention Research
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 1992

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2006

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

IPA - Laura Jane Fish

Administered By
Family Medicine and Community Health
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

IPA-Laura Fish

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Veterans Administration Medical Center
Role
Clinical Research Manager
Start Date
End Date

Implement SmokeFreeTXT eReferral Program into the Duke Smoking Cessation Program

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
ICF International, Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Evaluating fitness-for-use of Electronic Health Records in Clinical Research

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Food and Drug Administration
Role
Interviewer
Start Date
End Date

Large-scale Implementation of Community Co-led Maternal Sepsis Care Practices to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality from Maternal Infection

Administered By
Anesthesiology, Women's
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Ovarian Cancer Epidemiology, Healthcare Access and Disparities (ORCHiD): methodology for a population-based study of black, Hispanic and white patients with ovarian cancer.

INTRODUCTION: Less than 40% of patients with ovarian cancer (OC) in the USA receive stage-appropriate guideline-adherent surgery and chemotherapy. Black patients with cancer report greater depression, pain and fatigue than white patients. Lack of access to healthcare likely contributes to low treatment rates and racial differences in outcomes. The Ovarian Cancer Epidemiology, Healthcare Access and Disparities study aims to characterise healthcare access (HCA) across five specific dimensions-Availability, Affordability, Accessibility, Accommodation and Acceptability-among black, Hispanic and white patients with OC, evaluate the impact of HCA on quality of treatment, supportive care and survival, and explore biological mechanisms that may contribute to OC disparities. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use the Surveillance Epidemiology and Ends Results dataset linked with Medicare claims data from 9744 patients with OC ages 65 years and older. We will recruit 1641 patients with OC (413 black, 299 Hispanic and 929 white) from cancer registries in nine US states. We will examine HCA dimensions in relation to three main outcomes: (1) receipt of quality, guideline adherent initial treatment and supportive care, (2) quality of life based on patient-reported outcomes and (3) survival. We will obtain saliva and vaginal microbiome samples to examine prognostic biomarkers. We will use hierarchical regression models to estimate the impact of HCA dimensions across patient, neighbourhood, provider and hospital levels, with random effects to account for clustering. Multilevel structural equation models will estimate the total, direct and indirect effects of race on treatment mediated through HCA dimensions. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Result dissemination will occur through presentations at national meetings and in collaboration with collaborators, community partners and colleagues across othercancer centres. We will disclose findings to key stakeholders, including scientists, providers and community members. This study has been approved by the Duke Institutional Review Board (Pro00101872). Safety considerations include protection of patient privacy. All disseminated data will be deidentified and summarised.
Authors
Akinyemiju, T; Deveaux, A; Wilson, L; Gupta, A; Joshi, A; Bevel, M; Omeogu, C; Ohamadike, O; Huang, B; Pisu, M; Liang, M; McFatrich, M; Daniell, E; Fish, LJ; Ward, K; Schymura, M; Berchuck, A; Potosky, AL
MLA Citation
Akinyemiju, Tomi, et al. “Ovarian Cancer Epidemiology, Healthcare Access and Disparities (ORCHiD): methodology for a population-based study of black, Hispanic and white patients with ovarian cancer.Bmj Open, vol. 11, no. 10, Oct. 2021, p. e052808. Pubmed, doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2021-052808.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498278
PMID
34607872
Source
pubmed
Published In
Bmj Open
Volume
11
Published Date
Start Page
e052808
DOI
10.1136/bmjopen-2021-052808

Examining Associations between Knowledge and Vaccine Uptake Using the Human Papillomavirus Knowledge Questionnaire (HPV-KQ).

Objectives: Understanding the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and vaccination behavior is important to inform public health interventions, yet few validated HPV knowledge scales exist. This study describes development of the Human Papillomavirus Knowledge Questionnaire (HPV-KQ) and its validation with parents residing in the southern United States (US). Methods: Drawing on previously published measures, we developed the 13-item HPV-KQ and administered the scale via Web-based survey to parents (N=1105) of adolescents ages 9 to 17 years. Dimensionality, internal consistency, model fit, and predictive validity were assessed. Results: The scale was bidimensional. One factor captured general HPV knowledge, and the second factor captured perceptions of gender differences in HPV infection and vaccine recommendations. The 13-item scale and 2-factor solution displayed strong internal consistency and good model fit. Parents of vaccinated adolescents scored higher on the 13-item HPV-KQ (Mean = 8.56) than parents of unvaccinated adolescents (Mean = 6.43) (p < .001). In regression models, controlling for key covariates, parents' performance on the HPV-KQ predicted adolescent HPV vaccination (p < .001). Conclusions: Evaluation indicates the HPV-KQ is a reliable and valid tool for measuring knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccine among parents residing in the southern US. We recommend further efforts to validate the scale with other populations.
Authors
Harrison, SE; Yelverton, V; Wang, Y; Ostermann, J; Fish, LJ; Williams, CL; Vasudevan, L; Walter, EB
MLA Citation
Harrison, Sayward E., et al. “Examining Associations between Knowledge and Vaccine Uptake Using the Human Papillomavirus Knowledge Questionnaire (HPV-KQ).Am J Health Behav, vol. 45, no. 5, Sept. 2021, pp. 810–27. Pubmed, doi:10.5993/AJHB.45.5.2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1500206
PMID
34702429
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Health Behav
Volume
45
Published Date
Start Page
810
End Page
827
DOI
10.5993/AJHB.45.5.2

Radiology Stereotypes, Application Barriers, and Hospital Integration: A Mixed-methods Study of Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology.

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Limited exposure to radiology by medical students can perpetuate negative stereotypes and hamper recruitment efforts. The purpose of this study is to understand medical students' perceptions of radiology and how they change based on medical education and exposure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single-institution mixed-methods study included four groups of medical students with different levels of radiology exposure. All participants completed a 16-item survey regarding demographics, opinions of radiology, and perception of radiology stereotypes. Ten focus groups were administered to probe perceptions of radiology. Focus groups were coded to identify specific themes in conjunction with the survey results. RESULTS: Forty-nine participants were included. Forty-two percent of participants had positive opinions of radiology. Multiple radiology stereotypes were identified, and false stereotypes were diminished with increased radiology exposure. Opinions of the impact of artificial intelligence on radiology closely aligned with positive or negative views of the field overall. Multiple barriers to applying for a radiology residency position were identified including board scores and lack of mentorship. COVID-19 did not affect perceptions of radiology. There was broad agreement that students do not enter medical school with many preconceived notions of radiology, but that subsequent exposure was generally positive. Exposure both solidified and eliminated various stereotypes. Finally, there was general agreement that radiology is integral to the health system with broad exposure on all services. CONCLUSION: Medical student perceptions of radiology are notably influenced by exposure and radiology programs should take active steps to engage in medical student education.
Authors
Grimm, LJ; Fish, LJ; Carrico, CW; Martin, JG; Nwankwo, VC; Farley, S; Meltzer, CC; Maxfield, CM
MLA Citation
Grimm, Lars J., et al. “Radiology Stereotypes, Application Barriers, and Hospital Integration: A Mixed-methods Study of Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology.Acad Radiol, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.acra.2021.08.020.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497665
PMID
34563441
Source
pubmed
Published In
Acad Radiol
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.acra.2021.08.020

ASO Visual Abstract: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.

Authors
Shammas, RL; Fish, LJ; Sergesketter, AR; Offodile, AC; Phillips, BT; Oshima, S; Lee, CN; Hollenbeck, ST; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Shammas, Ronnie L., et al. “ASO Visual Abstract: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.Ann Surg Oncol, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10779-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497298
PMID
34523001
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10779-4

Correction to: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.

Authors
Shammas, RL; Fish, LJ; Sergesketter, AR; Offodile, AC; Phillips, BT; Oshima, S; Lee, CN; Hollenbeck, ST; Greenup, RA
MLA Citation
Shammas, Ronnie L., et al. “Correction to: Dissatisfaction After Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: A Mixed-Methods Study.Annals of Surgical Oncology, Sept. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10796-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496634
PMID
34514524
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10796-3