Courtney Goodwin

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 2002

University of Florida

Ph.D. 2008

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

M.D. 2010

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Internship, Neurosurgery

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Residency, Neurosurgery

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Grants:

Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Spinal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pain Outcomes in Single-High Dose vs. Hypofractionated SBRT for Spinal Metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Extent of Resection and Spinal Stabilization and Reconstruction in Spinal Tumors

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
Medtronic, Inc.
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

SUMOylation of PYK2 in breast cancer spinal metastases

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

The Influence of Spinopelvic parameters on Spinal Tumor Outcomes

Administered By
Neurosurgery
Awarded By
North Carolina Spine Society
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Scoring System to Triage Patients for Spine Surgery in the Setting of Limited Resources: Application to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic and Beyond.

BACKGROUND: As of May 4, 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected >3.5 million people and touched every inhabited continent. Accordingly, it has stressed health systems worldwide, leading to the cancellation of elective surgical cases and discussions regarding health care resource rationing. It is expected that rationing of surgical resources will continue even after the pandemic peak and may recur with future pandemics, creating a need for a means of triaging patients for emergent and elective spine surgery. METHODS: Using a modified Delphi technique, a cohort of 16 fellowship-trained spine surgeons from 10 academic medical centers constructed a scoring system for the triage and prioritization of emergent and elective spine surgeries. Three separate rounds of videoconferencing and written correspondence were used to reach a final scoring system. Sixteen test cases were used to optimize the scoring system so that it could categorize cases as requiring emergent, urgent, high-priority elective, or low-priority elective scheduling. RESULTS: The devised scoring system included 8 independent components: neurologic status, underlying spine stability, presentation of a high-risk postoperative complication, patient medical comorbidities, expected hospital course, expected discharge disposition, facility resource limitations, and local disease burden. The resultant calculator was deployed as a freely available Web-based calculator (https://jhuspine3.shinyapps.io/SpineUrgencyCalculator/). CONCLUSIONS: We present the first quantitative urgency scoring system for the triage and prioritizing of spine surgery cases in resource-limited settings. We believe that our scoring system, although not all encompassing, has potential value as a guide for triaging spine surgical cases during the COVID pandemic and post-COVID period.
Authors
Sciubba, DM; Ehresman, J; Pennington, Z; Lubelski, D; Feghali, J; Bydon, A; Chou, D; Elder, BD; Elsamadicy, AA; Goodwin, CR; Goodwin, ML; Harrop, J; Klineberg, EO; Laufer, I; Lo, S-FL; Neuman, BJ; Passias, PG; Protopsaltis, T; Shin, JH; Theodore, N; Witham, TF; Benzel, EC
MLA Citation
Sciubba, Daniel M., et al. “Scoring System to Triage Patients for Spine Surgery in the Setting of Limited Resources: Application to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic and Beyond.World Neurosurg, vol. 140, Aug. 2020, pp. e373–80. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.wneu.2020.05.233.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1446748
PMID
32479913
Source
pubmed
Published In
World Neurosurg
Volume
140
Published Date
Start Page
e373
End Page
e380
DOI
10.1016/j.wneu.2020.05.233

Abstracts from Hydrocephalus 2016.

Authors
Adam, A; Robison, J; Lu, J; Jose, R; Badran, N; Vivas-Buitrago, T; Rigamonti, D; Sattar, A; Omoush, O; Hammad, M; Dawood, M; Maghaslah, M; Belcher, T; Carson, K; Hoffberger, J; Jusué Torres, I; Foley, S; Yasar, S; Thai, QA; Wemmer, J; Klinge, P; Al-Mutawa, L; Al-Ghamdi, H; Carson, KA; Asgari, M; de Zélicourt, D; Kurtcuoglu, V; Garnotel, S; Salmon, S; Balédent, O; Lokossou, A; Page, G; Balardy, L; Czosnyka, Z; Payoux, P; Schmidt, EA; Zitoun, M; Sevestre, MA; Alperin, N; Baudracco, I; Craven, C; Matloob, S; Thompson, S; Haylock Vize, P; Thorne, L; Watkins, LD; Toma, AK; Bechter, K; Pong, AC; Jugé, L; Bilston, LE; Cheng, S; Bradley, W; Hakim, F; Ramón, JF; Cárdenas, MF; Davidson, JS; García, C; González, D; Bermúdez, S; Useche, N; Mejía, JA; Mayorga, P; Cruz, F; Martinez, C; Matiz, MC; Vallejo, M; Ghotme, K; Soto, HA; Riveros, D; Buitrago, A; Mora, M; Murcia, L; Bermudez, S; Cohen, D; Dasgupta, D; Curtis, C; Domínguez, L; Remolina, AJ; Grijalba, MA; Whitehouse, KJ; Edwards, RJ; Eleftheriou, A; Lundin, F; Fountas, KN; Kapsalaki, EZ; Smisson, HF; Robinson, JS; Fritsch, MJ; Arouk, W; Garzon, M; Kang, M; Sandhu, K; Baghawatti, D; Aquilina, K; James, G; Thompson, D; Gehlen, M; Schmid Daners, M; Eklund, A; Malm, J; Gomez, D; Guerra, M; Jara, M; Flores, M; Vío, K; Moreno, I; Rodríguez, S; Ortega, E; Rodríguez, EM; McAllister, JP; Guerra, MM; Morales, DM; Sival, D; Jimenez, A; Limbrick, DD; Ishikawa, M; Yamada, S; Yamamoto, K; Junkkari, A; Häyrinen, A; Rauramaa, T; Sintonen, H; Nerg, O; Koivisto, AM; Roine, RP; Viinamäki, H; Soininen, H; Luikku, A; Jääskeläinen, JE; Leinonen, V; Kehler, U; Lilja-Lund, O; Kockum, K; Larsson, EM; Riklund, K; Söderström, L; Hellström, P; Laurell, K; Kojoukhova, M; Sutela, A; Vanninen, R; Vanha, KI; Timonen, M; Rummukainen, J; Korhonen, V; Helisalmi, S; Solje, E; Remes, AM; Huovinen, J; Paananen, J; Hiltunen, M; Kurki, M; Martin, B; Loth, F; Luciano, M; Luikku, AJ; Hall, A; Herukka, SK; Mattila, J; Lötjönen, J; Alafuzoff, I; Jurjević, I; Miyajima, M; Nakajima, M; Murai, H; Shin, T; Kawaguchi, D; Akiba, C; Ogino, I; Karagiozov, K; Arai, H; Reis, RC; Teixeira, MJ; Valêncio, CG; da Vigua, D; Almeida-Lopes, L; Mancini, MW; Pinto, FCG; Maykot, RH; Calia, G; Tornai, J; Silvestre, SSS; Mendes, G; Sousa, V; Bezerra, B; Dutra, P; Modesto, P; Oliveira, MF; Petitto, CE; Pulhorn, H; Chandran, A; McMahon, C; Rao, AS; Jumaly, M; Solomon, D; Moghekar, A; Relkin, N; Hamilton, M; Katzen, H; Williams, M; Bach, T; Zuspan, S; Holubkov, R; Rigamonti, A; Clemens, G; Sharkey, P; Sanyal, A; Sankey, E; Rigamonti, K; Naqvi, S; Hung, A; Schmidt, E; Ory-Magne, F; Gantet, P; Guenego, A; Januel, AC; Tall, P; Fabre, N; Mahieu, L; Cognard, C; Gray, L; Buttner-Ennever, JA; Takagi, K; Onouchi, K; Thompson, SD; Thorne, LD; Tully, HM; Wenger, TL; Kukull, WA; Doherty, D; Dobyns, WB; Moran, D; Vakili, S; Patel, MA; Elder, B; Goodwin, CR; Crawford, JA; Pletnikov, MV; Xu, J; Blitz, A; Herzka, DA; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A; Mori, S; Saavedra, P; Treviño, H; Maitani, K; Ziai, WC; Eslami, V; Nekoovaght-Tak, S; Dlugash, R; Yenokyan, G; McBee, N; Hanley, DF
MLA Citation
Adam, A., et al. “Abstracts from Hydrocephalus 2016.Fluids Barriers Cns, vol. 14, no. Suppl 1, June 2017, p. 15. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s12987-017-0054-5.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1434849
PMID
28929972
Source
pubmed
Published In
Fluids and Barriers of the Cns
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
15
DOI
10.1186/s12987-017-0054-5

Enhancing Reality: A Systematic Review of Augmented Reality in Neuronavigation and Education.

OBJECTIVE: Augmented reality (AR) is increasingly being explored as an adjunct to conventional neuronavigation systems. AR affords the ability to superimpose 3-dimensional images onto the real environment. A natural extension of this technology is to help guide neurosurgical planning and a means of stereotactic planning and guidance. Here we review the literature on the use of AR in neurosurgery with a focus on current technologies and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss this technology in the context of neurosurgical training as an educational tool. METHODS: PubMed search was performed for "augmented reality and neurosurgery" and "mixed reality and neurosurgery" from 2010. A total of 113 articles written in the last 5 years were retrieved, and 39 were ultimately included in the systematic review. RESULTS: The most common use of AR in neurosurgery was in cranial surgery (n = 26). Other uses included spine surgery (n = 9) and education (n = 2). Devices used for display of AR images varied as did image-to-patient registration methods and overall system accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: Although various AR systems have been successfully utilized across many neurosurgical disciplines, more research is needed to improve accuracy in registration and to assess whether AR-assisted surgery is safe and effective for widespread adoption.
Authors
Cho, J; Rahimpour, S; Cutler, A; Goodwin, CR; Lad, SP; Codd, P
MLA Citation
Cho, James, et al. “Enhancing Reality: A Systematic Review of Augmented Reality in Neuronavigation and Education.World Neurosurg, vol. 139, July 2020, pp. 186–95. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.wneu.2020.04.043.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1437963
PMID
32311561
Source
pubmed
Published In
World Neurosurg
Volume
139
Published Date
Start Page
186
End Page
195
DOI
10.1016/j.wneu.2020.04.043

The Role of Radiotherapy for Chordoma Patients Managed With Surgery: Analysis of the National Cancer Database.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. OBJECTIVE: To determine if adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) following surgical resection of chordomas. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The role of RT for the treatment of chordomas remains incompletely described. Previous studies have not found adjuvant RT to improve OS, but these studies did not group patients based on surgical margin status or radiation dose or modality. We used the National Cancer Database to investigate the role of RT in chordomas following surgical resection. METHODS: Patients were stratified based on surgical margin status (positive vs. negative). Utilizing the Kaplan-Meier method, OS was compared between treatment modalities (surgical resection alone, therapeutic RT alone, and surgical resection plus therapeutic RT). OS was subsequently compared between patients treated with palliative dose (<40 Gy), low dose (40-65 Gy), and high dose (>65 Gy) RT. Similarly, OS was compared between advanced RT modalities including proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). A multivariable model was used to determine adjusted variables predictive of mortality. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred seventy eight chordoma patients were identified; skull base (n = 567), sacral (n = 551), and mobile spine (n = 360). Surgical resection and therapeutic adjuvant RT improved 5-year survival in patients with positive surgical margins (82% vs. 71%, P = 0.03). No clear survival benefit was observed with the addition of adjuvant RT in patients with negative surgical margins. High dose RT was associated with improved OS compared with palliative and low dose RT (P < 0.001). Advanced RT techniques and SRS were associated with improved OS compared with EBRT. In the multivariate analysis high dose advanced RT (>65 Gy) was superior to EBRT. CONCLUSION: Patients with positive surgical margins benefit from adjuvant RT. Optimal OS is associated with adjuvant RT administered with advanced techniques and cumulative dose more than 65 Gy. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.
Authors
Dial, BL; Kerr, DL; Lazarides, AL; Catanzano, AA; Green, CL; Risoli, T; Blazer, DG; Goodwin, RC; Brigman, BE; Eward, WC; Larrier, NA; Kirsch, DG; Mendoza-Lattes, SA
MLA Citation
Dial, Brian L., et al. “The Role of Radiotherapy for Chordoma Patients Managed With Surgery: Analysis of the National Cancer Database.Spine (Phila Pa 1976), vol. 45, no. 12, June 2020, pp. E742–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/BRS.0000000000003406.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431138
PMID
32032324
Source
pubmed
Published In
Spine (Phila Pa 1976)
Volume
45
Published Date
Start Page
E742
End Page
E751
DOI
10.1097/BRS.0000000000003406

Improved Dysphagia Outcomes in Anchored Spacers Versus Plate-Screw Systems in Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Systematic Review

<jats:sec><jats:title>Study Design:</jats:title><jats:p> Systematic review and meta-analysis. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Objective:</jats:title><jats:p> To perform a systematic review of clinical outcomes between stand-alone anchored spacers and traditional cages with plate fixation for dysphagia and pseudoarthrosis using data from clinical trials. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods:</jats:title><jats:p> Our search protocol was added to PROSPERO register and systematic review using PRISMA method was performed. Then, we systematically searched for studies addressing stand-alone anchored spacers in patients who underwent ACDF. Mean Neck Disability Index (NDI), dysphagia incidence % (Dinc%), and Swallowing–Quality of Life (SQOL) scores during preoperative, immediate postoperative and last follow-up visits were extracted. Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used for statistical comparisons ( P ≤ .05). </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results:</jats:title><jats:p> The initial search generated 506 articles in CENTRAL and 40 articles in MEDLINE. Finally, 14 articles were included. Total number of patients was 1173 (583 anchored stand-alone and 590 plate). Dinc% scores were statistically significantly lower in the stand-alone anchored spacer compared to the plate-screw construct ( P ≤ .05). ANOVA showed no statistically significant difference in the comparisons of SQOL. On the other hand, NDI scores were statistically significantly lower in baseline of stand-alone anchored spacer and the plate-screw construct compared with both immediate postoperative and last follow-up visits ( P ≤ .05). </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions:</jats:title><jats:p> Our study results revealed that the stand-alone anchored spacers were associated with less dysphagia in the immediate and last follow-up. </jats:p></jats:sec>
Authors
Gabr, MA; Touko, E; Yadav, AP; Karikari, I; Goodwin, CR; Groff, MW; Ramirez, L; Abd-El-Barr, MM
MLA Citation
Gabr, Mostafa A., et al. “Improved Dysphagia Outcomes in Anchored Spacers Versus Plate-Screw Systems in Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Systematic Review.” Global Spine Journal, SAGE Publications, pp. 219256821989526–219256821989526. Crossref, doi:10.1177/2192568219895266.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427908
Source
crossref
Published In
Global Spine Journal
Start Page
219256821989526
End Page
219256821989526
DOI
10.1177/2192568219895266

Research Areas:

Bone metastasis
Ependymoma
Tumor Microenvironment
Tumor markers