Jenny Hoang

Overview:

Dr. Jenny K. Hoang MBBS is a neuroradiologist and Associate Professor in Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Duke University, NC USA where she is the Director of Head and Neck Radiology and Chair of the Grand Rounds Committee. Her career is accentuated by her strong involvement in research and education. She led the American College of Radiology (ACR) efforts in producing a White Paper on Incidental Thyroid Findings and was a core member of the ACR TI-RADS committee for thyroid ultrasound. She also serves on the National Cancer Institute PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board.

She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles with a focus on thyroid and parathyroid imaging. Dr. Hoang was the recipient of GE-Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF) Program (2010-2012) and ACR Innovations Grant (2017). She is a popular a faculty lecturer at national and international meetings. She is also actively educating and advocating on Twitter. Connect with her at @JennyKHoang.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Neuroradiology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.B.B.S. 1999

University of Melbourne (Australia)

Grants:

From ACR White Papers to National Guidelines: Formalizing the Consensus Process for Algorithm-Based Recommendations

Administered By
Radiology, Neuroradiology
Awarded By
American College of Radiology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Incidental Thyroid Nodules Detected in the National Lung Screening Trial:

Administered By
Radiology
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The Impact of Gadolinium Deposition on Radiology Practice: An International Survey of Radiologists.

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Brain deposition of gadolinium following the administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) was initially reported in 2014. Gadolinium deposition is now recognized as a dose-dependent consequence of exposure. The potential clinical implications are not yet understood. The purpose of this study was to determine radiologists' reporting practices in response to gadolinium deposition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic survey querying radiologists' practices regarding gadolinium deposition was distributed by Radiopaedia.org from November-December 2015. RESULTS: Our study sample included 94 total respondents (50% academic; 27% private practice; 23% hybrid) from 30 different countries (USA 18%). Fifty-seven (62%) radiologists had observed brain gadolinium deposition on MRI brain studies howerver more than half of these (30 of 57) reported detecting dentate T1 shortening only rarely (<1/month). Among respondents, 58% (52 of 89) do not or would not include the finding in the radiology report; only 12 (13%) report the finding in the impression of their reports. The most common reason for not reporting gadolinium deposition was the risk of provoking unnecessary patient anxiety (29%, 20 of 70). Recent data on gadolinium deposition has led to a reported practice change in 24 of 87 (28%) of respondents. CONCLUSION: Recognition of, and attitudes toward, brain gadolinium deposition were inconsistent in this worldwide sample. Most surveyed radiologists do not routinely report dentate T1shortening as a marker of gadolinium deposition. Fear of provoking patient/clinician anxiety and an incomplete understanding of the implications of gadolinium deposition contribute to inconsistencies in reporting.
Authors
Fitzgerald, RT; Agarwal, V; Hoang, JK; Gaillard, F; Dixon, A; Kanal, E
MLA Citation
Fitzgerald, Ryan T., et al. “The Impact of Gadolinium Deposition on Radiology Practice: An International Survey of Radiologists..” Curr Probl Diagn Radiol, vol. 48, no. 3, May 2019, pp. 220–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1067/j.cpradiol.2018.02.003.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1306519
PMID
29530452
Source
pubmed
Published In
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol
Volume
48
Published Date
Start Page
220
End Page
223
DOI
10.1067/j.cpradiol.2018.02.003

Authors' Reply.

Authors
Tessler, FN; Middleton, WD; Grant, EG; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Tessler, Franklin N., et al. “Authors' Reply..” J Am Coll Radiol, vol. 14, no. 12, Dec. 2017, pp. 1522–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.034.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1288168
PMID
29202934
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
1522
End Page
1523
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.034

Prospective Validation of Two 4D-CT-Based Scoring Systems for Prediction of Multigland Disease in Primary Hyperparathyroidism.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with multigland primary hyperparathyroidism are at higher risk for missed lesions on imaging and failed parathyroidectomy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively validate the ability of previously derived predictive score systems, the composite multigland disease score, and the multiphase multidetector contrast-enhanced CT (4D-CT) composite multigland disease score, to identify patients with a high likelihood of multigland disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of 71 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent 4D-CT and successful parathyroidectomy. The size and number of lesions identified on 4D-CT, serum calcium levels, and parathyroid hormone levels were collected. A composite multigland disease score was calculated from 4D-CT imaging findings and the Wisconsin Index (the product of the serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels). A 4D-CT multigland disease score was obtained by using the CT data alone. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients with multigland disease were compared with 43 patients with single-gland disease. Patients with multigland disease had a significantly smaller lesion size (P < .01) and a higher likelihood of having either ≥2 or 0 lesions identified on 4D-CT (P < .01). Composite multigland disease scores of ≥4, ≥5, and 6 had specificities of 72%, 86%, and 100% for multigland disease, respectively. 4D-CT multigland disease scores of ≥3 and 4 had specificities of 74% and 88%. CONCLUSIONS: Predictive scoring systems based on 4D-CT data, with or without laboratory data, were able to identify a subgroup of patients with a high likelihood of multigland disease in a prospectively accrued population of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. These scoring systems can aid in surgical planning.
Authors
Sho, S; Yilma, M; Yeh, MW; Livhits, M; Wu, JX; Hoang, JK; Sepahdari, AR
MLA Citation
Sho, S., et al. “Prospective Validation of Two 4D-CT-Based Scoring Systems for Prediction of Multigland Disease in Primary Hyperparathyroidism..” Ajnr Am J Neuroradiol, vol. 37, no. 12, Dec. 2016, pp. 2323–27. Pubmed, doi:10.3174/ajnr.A4948.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1146562
PMID
27659191
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ajnr Am J Neuroradiol
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
2323
End Page
2327
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A4948

Parathyroid Adenomas and Hyperplasia on Four-dimensional CT Scans: Three Patterns of Enhancement Relative to the Thyroid Gland Justify a Three-Phase Protocol.

PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of three relative enhancement patterns of parathyroid lesions on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic (CT) scans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study and waived the need for informed consent. The authors retrospectively reviewed preoperative 4D CT scans obtained from November 2012 to June 2014 in 94 patients with pathologically proven parathyroid adenomas or hyperplasia. Lesions were classified into one of three relative enhancement patterns. All patterns required lesions to be lower in attenuation than the thyroid on non-contrast material-enhanced images, but patterns differed in the two contrast-enhanced phases. Type A lesions were higher in attenuation than the thyroid in the arterial phase, type B lesions were not higher in attenuation than the thyroid in the arterial phase but were lower in attenuation than the thyroid in the delayed phase, and type C lesions were neither higher in attenuation than the thyroid in the arterial phase nor lower in attenuation than the thyroid in the delayed phase. The prevalence of the relative enhancement patterns was compared. The t test was used to compare mean attenuation differences in Hounsfield units between the relative enhancement patterns. RESULTS: Ninety-four patients had 110 parathyroid lesions, including 11 patients with multigland disease. The sensitivity for single-gland disease was 94% (78 of 83) and that for multigland disease was 59% (16 of 27). Type B enhancement was most common, with a prevalence of 57% (54 of 94), followed by type C (22% [21 of 94]) and type A (20% [19 of 94]). Five lesions were interpreted incorrectly as parathyroid adenoma (false-positive), and all lesions had the type C pattern. Relative to the thyroid, lesions categorized as type A by readers had mean attenuation difference (± standard deviation) of 39 HU ± 13 in the arterial phase, and type B lesions had a difference of -58 HU ± 26 in the delayed phase. These values differed from the mean attenuation difference of lesions not in these categories (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Parathyroid adenomas and hyperplasia can be grouped into three relative enhancement patterns based on a protocol with a non-contrast-enhanced and two contrast-enhanced phases. The type B pattern is most common and could be diagnosed with two contrast-enhanced phases. However, almost one quarter of lesions have the type C pattern and thus could be missed without the non-contrast-enhanced phase.
Authors
Bahl, M; Sepahdari, AR; Sosa, JA; Hoang, JK
MLA Citation
Bahl, Manisha, et al. “Parathyroid Adenomas and Hyperplasia on Four-dimensional CT Scans: Three Patterns of Enhancement Relative to the Thyroid Gland Justify a Three-Phase Protocol..” Radiology, vol. 277, no. 2, Nov. 2015, pp. 454–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1148/radiol.2015142393.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1073935
PMID
26024308
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiology
Volume
277
Published Date
Start Page
454
End Page
462
DOI
10.1148/radiol.2015142393

What to do with incidental thyroid nodules identified on imaging studies? Review of current evidence and recommendations.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the problem of incidental thyroid nodules (ITN) detected on imaging; summarize the literature for workup methods; and provide recommendations based on current evidence. RECENT FINDINGS: ITN are a common problem, seen in 40-50% of ultrasound and 16% of computed tomography (CT) and MRI studies that include the thyroid. The personal and financial costs of workup frequently outweigh the benefits when considering that the majority of ITN are benign; 25-41% of patients undergo surgery after biopsy, of which more than half ultimately result in a benign diagnosis, and small thyroid cancers have an indolent course. Workup should consider reduction in unnecessary workup in addition to cancer diagnosis. The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound recommendations have been proposed for ITN detected on ultrasound and found to reduce workup by 30%. For ITN detected on CT, MRI, or PET/CT, a three-tiered system categorization method reduces workup of ITN by 35-46%. SUMMARY: The ideal approach to selecting ITN detected on imaging for workup would not be to diagnose all cancers, but to diagnose cancers that have reached clinical significance, while avoiding unnecessary tests and surgery in patients with benign nodules, especially those who have limited life expectancy. The three-tiered system and the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound recommendations are supported by existing studies and focus on reducing unnecessary biopsy.
Authors
Hoang, JK; Grady, AT; Nguyen, XV
MLA Citation
Hoang, Jenny K., et al. “What to do with incidental thyroid nodules identified on imaging studies? Review of current evidence and recommendations..” Curr Opin Oncol, vol. 27, no. 1, Jan. 2015, pp. 8–14. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/CCO.0000000000000147.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1047408
PMID
25310642
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Opinion in Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
8
End Page
14
DOI
10.1097/CCO.0000000000000147

Research Areas:

Abscess
Academic Medical Centers
Age Distribution
Anesthetics, Local
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiography
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Aorta, Thoracic
Aortography
Arteries
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Body Burden
Brain Ischemia
Brain Neoplasms
Calcinosis
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating
Carcinoma, Papillary
Carcinoma, Renal Cell
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Carotid Artery, Internal
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae
Chemoradiotherapy
Circle of Willis
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Disease
Documentation
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrocardiography
Eponyms
Fibromuscular Dysplasia
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography
Frontal Bone
Gallstones
Glioma
Glucose
Guideline Adherence
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Care Surveys
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary
Hyperthyroidism
Image Enhancement
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Immunohistochemistry
Incidental Findings
Injections
Injections, Epidural
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Injections, Intralesional
Injections, Intravenous
Jugular Veins
Kidney Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Lymphatic Metastasis
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Mammography
Mastoiditis
Myelography
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms
Neck
Nerve Block
Observer Variation
Oligodendroglioma
Organ Size
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Parotid Gland
Patient Safety
Petrous Bone
Phantoms, Imaging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumonectomy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Pulmonary Artery
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection
Radiculopathy
Radiographic Image Enhancement
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Radiology
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques
Retropharyngeal Abscess
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Spinal Nerve Roots
Staphylococcal Infections
Statistics, Nonparametric
Streptococcal Infections
Stroke
Syndrome
Thrombophlebitis
Thyroid Diseases
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule
Thyroidectomy
Tomography, Spiral Computed
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Triiodobenzoic Acids
Tumor Burden
Ultrasonography
Young Adult