Brant Inman

Overview:

Clinical research interests:
Clinical trials of novel diagnostic tests and therapies for genitourinary malignancies, with a strong focus on bladder cancer.

Basic science research interests:
Immune therapies for cancer, hyperthermia and heat-based treatment of cancer, molecular biology of genitourinary cancers, novel diagnostics and therapies for genitourinary cancers

Positions:

Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Urology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1999

University of Alberta (Canada)

M.D. 2000

University of Alberta (Canada)

M.S. 2011

Mayo Clinic, Alix School of Medicine

Residency, Urology

Universite Laval (Canada)

Fellowship, Urologic Oncology

Mayo Clinic

Grants:

Phase II Trial of Aerobic Training in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PHASE III, OPEN-LABEL, MULTICENTER, RANDOMIZED STUDY BLADDER CANCER

Awarded By
Genentech, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase 2 Study of BC-819 in Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Whose Disease is Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

Administered By
Surgery, Urology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE Ib/II, OPEN-LABEL STUDY OF THE SAFETY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF ATEZOLIZUMAB ADMINISTERED WITH OR WITHOUT BACILLE CALMETTE-GUÉRIN IN PATIENTS WITH HIGH-RISK NON¿MUSCLEINVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

Awarded By
Genentech, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

TAR-200 Study

Administered By
Surgery, Urology
Awarded By
TARIS Biomedical, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Levels During Androgen Deprivation Therapy Are Not Associated With Survival or Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Background Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) dysregulation plays a potential role in prostate cancer progression. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether higher FSH levels during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for recurrent prostate cancer could predict the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), prostate cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Methods Serum FSH levels were measured in cryopreserved samples of the continuous ADT arm of the PR.7 trial, supplemented with analogous samples from a large contemporaneous biobank. Univariate and multivariate analyses assessed the relationship between FSH tertiles and time to CRPC, as well as CSS, and OS. Results A total of 172 patients were included in our analysis. Of these, 54 patients (31%) developed CRPC during the 9-year follow-up. Median FSH for the tertiles was 4.35, 6.13, and 11.32 mIU/mL. FSH tertiles were not significantly associated with the time to CRPC, or with CSS or OS. FSH levels were not a significant prognostic factor for these oncologic outcomes. Conclusion As previously reported, the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists for ADT has significantly more suppression of FSH levels than GnRH agonists. Our results do not suggest that differences in circulating FSH 1 year following ADT initiation influence long-term oncologic outcomes or development of CRPC.
Authors
Atchia, K; Joncas, F-H; Trasiewicz, LS; Tan, WP; Ding, K; Inman, BA; Toren, P
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1511695
Source
manual
Published In
Soc Int Urol J
Volume
3
Start Page
56
End Page
61
DOI
10.48083/LWHQ7760

Personalized Medicine in Genitourinary Oncology Is Happening Now.

Authors
MLA Citation
Inman, Brant A. “Personalized Medicine in Genitourinary Oncology Is Happening Now.Eur Urol Focus, June 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.euf.2022.06.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1525053
PMID
35725969
Source
pubmed
Published In
European Urology Focus
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.euf.2022.06.005

Automated versus manual analysis of body composition measures on computed tomography in patients with bladder cancer.

PURPOSE: Manual measurement of body composition on computed tomography (CT) is time-consuming, limiting its clinical use. We validate a software program, Automatic Body composition Analyzer using Computed tomography image Segmentation (ABACS), for the automated measurement of body composition by comparing its performance to manual segmentation in a cohort of patients with bladder cancer. METHOD: We performed a retrospective analysis of 285 patients treated for bladder cancer at the Duke University Health System from 1996 to 2017. Abdominal CT images were manually segmented at L3 using Slice-O-Matic. Automated segmentation was performed with ABACS on the same L3-level images. Measures of interest were skeletal muscle (SM) area, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) area. SM index, SAT index, and VAT index were calculated by dividing component areas by patient height2 (m2). Patients were dichotomized as sarcopenic, having excessive subcutaneous fat, or having excessive visceral fat using published cut-off values. Agreement between manual and automated segmentation was assessed using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (PPMCC), the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC3), and the kappa statistic (κ). RESULTS: There was strong agreement between manual and automatic segmentation, with PPMCCs > 0.90 and ICC3s > 0.90 for SM, SAT, and VAT areas. Categorization of patients as sarcopenic (κ = 0.73), having excessive subcutaneous fat (κ = 0.88), or having excessive visceral fat (κ = 0.90) displayed high agreement between methods. CONCLUSIONS: Automated segmentation of body composition measures on CT using ABACS performs similarly to manual analysis and may expedite data collection in body composition research.
Authors
Rigiroli, F; Zhang, D; Molinger, J; Wang, Y; Chang, A; Wischmeyer, PE; Inman, BA; Gupta, RT
MLA Citation
Rigiroli, Francesca, et al. “Automated versus manual analysis of body composition measures on computed tomography in patients with bladder cancer.Eur J Radiol, vol. 154, June 2022, p. 110413. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ejrad.2022.110413.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1525000
PMID
35732083
Source
pubmed
Published In
Eur J Radiol
Volume
154
Published Date
Start Page
110413
DOI
10.1016/j.ejrad.2022.110413

Genomic Sequencing Should Not be Part of the Standard of Care for Most Urologic Cancers.

There are currently few situations in which genomic testing is actionable for genitourinary tumors. Without clear indications or treatment paradigms, genomic sequencing cannot be recommended as a standard of care for genitourinary tumors.
Authors
Abern, MR; Dudinec, JV; Inman, BA
MLA Citation
Abern, Michael R., et al. “Genomic Sequencing Should Not be Part of the Standard of Care for Most Urologic Cancers.Eur Urol Focus, May 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.euf.2022.04.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1520607
PMID
35537938
Source
pubmed
Published In
European Urology Focus
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.euf.2022.04.011

Pre-existing Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer-like Cells in Primary Prostate Cancer Promote Resistance to Hormonal Therapy.

BACKGROUND: Hormonal therapy targeting the androgen receptor inhibits prostate cancer (PCa), but the tumor eventually recurs as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). OBJECTIVE: To understand the mechanisms by which subclones within early PCa develop into CRPC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We isolated epithelial cells from fresh human PCa cases, including primary adenocarcinoma, locally recurrent CRPC, and metastatic CRPC, and utilized single-cell RNA sequencing to identify subpopulations destined to become either CRPC-adeno or small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC). OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We revealed dynamic transcriptional reprogramming that promotes disease progression among 23226 epithelial cells using single-cell RNA sequencing, and validated subset-specific progression using immunohistochemistry and large cohorts of publically available genomic data. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We identified a small fraction of highly plastic CRPC-like cells in hormone-naïve early PCa and demonstrated its correlation with biochemical recurrence and distant metastasis, independent of clinical characteristics. We show that progression toward castration resistance was initiated from subtype-specific lineage plasticity and clonal expansion of pre-existing neuroendocrine and CRPC-like cells in early PCa. CONCLUSIONS: CRPC-like cells are present early in the development of PCa and are not exclusively the result of acquired evolutionary selection during androgen deprivation therapy. The lethal CRPC and SCNC phenotypes should be targeted earlier in the disease course of patients with PCa. PATIENT SUMMARY: Here, we report the presence of pre-existing castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)-like cells in primary prostate cancer, which represents a novel castration-resistant mechanism different from the adaptation mechanism after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients whose tumors harbor increased pre-existing neuroendocrine and CRPC-like cells may become rapidly resistant to ADT and may require aggressive early intervention.
Authors
Cheng, Q; Butler, W; Zhou, Y; Zhang, H; Tang, L; Perkinson, K; Chen, X; Jiang, XS; McCall, SJ; Inman, BA; Huang, J
MLA Citation
Cheng, Qing, et al. “Pre-existing Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer-like Cells in Primary Prostate Cancer Promote Resistance to Hormonal Therapy.Eur Urol, vol. 81, no. 5, May 2022, pp. 446–55. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.eururo.2021.12.039.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506334
PMID
35058087
Source
pubmed
Published In
Eur Urol
Volume
81
Published Date
Start Page
446
End Page
455
DOI
10.1016/j.eururo.2021.12.039

Research Areas:

BCG Vaccine
Cancer Vaccines
Carcinoma, Renal Cell
Clinical Trial
Cystectomy
Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Kidney Neoplasms
Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia
Metastasectomy
Nephrectomy
Penile Neoplasms
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms
Testicular Diseases
Testicular Neoplasms
Thermotherapy
Urethral Neoplasms
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Urinary Diversion
Urologic Neoplasms
Urology