Xiaoyin Jiang

Overview:

I am a pathologist specializing in cytopathology and surgical pathology. I diagnose diseases through integrating clinical history and studying patient samples under the microscope. As a cytopathologist, I perform fine needle aspiration biopsies in our clinic. I serve as Associate Director of the Duke Biorepository and Precision Pathology Center (BRPC). The Duke BRPC is the largest broad consent biobanking protocol and human tissue repository on campus.  It also provides specialty tissue processing services including histology, immunohistochemistry, and tissue microarray.
My research interests focus on the pathology of the head and neck and endocrine systems, working with a multidisciplinary team to improve our understanding of disease. I also focus on novel applications of social media for physicians and medical education.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Duke University School of Medicine

Resident, Pathology

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellow, Cytopathology

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Publications:

Social media in academics and research: 21st century tools to turbocharge education, collaboration, and dissemination of research findings.

The near-ubiquitous use of smartphones and the rapid emergence of free, widely used, social media platforms have combined to turbocharge dissemination of information at a scale and speed that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Increasingly, internet-savvy pathologists of all ages from every corner of the world are flipping the paradigm of traditional academia by posting educational content online free of charge, unencumbered by the limitations of traditional print media and educational conferences. These platforms are being used in innovative ways to not just disseminate research findings, but to create new knowledge through using them to empower research collaborations. In this review, we outline ways in which social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube are being used by pathologists to enhance academic work and facilitate dissemination of research. We outline key differences between the various platforms with respect to pathology academics and research, and describe key areas in which these platforms have already made an impact. These include rapid dissemination of research findings to a worldwide audience, live trans-national discussion of journal articles and conference proceedings, intercontinental networking between pathologists for academic purposes, free education on a global scale at minimal or no cost, and research collaborations initiated on and facilitated by social media platforms. Finally, we provide practical tips for pathologists who wish to adopt these novel 21st century technologies to enhance their academic endeavors.
Authors
Deeken, AH; Mukhopadhyay, S; Jiang, XS
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1448867
PMID
32592211
Source
pubmed
Published In
Histopathology
Published Date
DOI
10.1111/his.14196

#EBUSTwitter: Novel Use of Social Media for Conception, Coordination, and Completion of an International, Multicenter Pathology Study.

CONTEXT.—: Social media sites are increasingly used for education, networking, and rapid dissemination of medical information, but their utility for facilitating research has remained largely untapped. OBJECTIVE.—: To describe in detail our experience using a social media platform (Twitter) for the successful initiation, coordination, and completion of an international, multi-institution pathology research study. DESIGN.—: Following a tweet describing a hitherto-unreported biopsy-related histologic finding in a mediastinal lymph node following endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, a tweet was posted to invite pathologists to participate in a validation study. Twitter's direct messaging feature was used to create a group to facilitate communication among participating pathologists. Contributing pathologists reviewed consecutive cases of mediastinal lymph node resection following endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and examined them specifically for biopsy site changes. Data spreadsheets containing deidentified data and digital photomicrographs of suspected biopsy site changes were submitted via an online file hosting service for central review by 5 pathologists from different institutions. RESULTS.—: The study recruited 24 pathologists from 14 institutions in 5 countries within 143 days of study conception, and a total of 297 cases were collected and analyzed. The time interval between study conception and acceptance of the manuscript for publication was 346 days. CONCLUSIONS.—: To our knowledge, this is the first time that a social media platform has been used to generate a research idea based on a tweet, recruit coinvestigators publicly, communicate with collaborating pathologists, and successfully complete a pathology study.
Authors
Lepe, M; Oltulu, P; Canepa, M; Wu, RI; Deeken, A; Alex, D; Dinares, C; Doxtader, EE; Fitzhugh, VA; Gibier, J-B; Jain, D; Janaki, N; Jelinek, A; Labiano, T; L'Imperio, V; Michael, C; Mukhopadhyay, S; Pagni, F; Panizo, A; Pijuan, L; Quintana, LM; Roy-Chowdhuri, S; Sanchez-Font, A; Sansano, I; Sauter, J; Skipper, D; Spruill, LS; Torous, V; Gardner, JM; Jiang, XS
MLA Citation
Lepe, Marcos, et al. “#EBUSTwitter: Novel Use of Social Media for Conception, Coordination, and Completion of an International, Multicenter Pathology Study.Arch Pathol Lab Med, Dec. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.5858/arpa.2019-0297-OA.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424885
PMID
31846366
Source
pubmed
Published In
Arch Pathol Lab Med
Published Date
DOI
10.5858/arpa.2019-0297-OA

High-risk and intermediate-high-risk results from the ThyroSeq v2 and v3 thyroid genomic classifier are associated with neoplasia: Independent performance assessment at an academic institution.

BACKGROUND:The ThyroSeq panel tests for genetic alterations to risk-stratify cytologically indeterminate nodules. The authors assessed the test performance of the tests, including the latest version (v3), at an academic center. METHODS:Results from ThyroSeq testing (v2 and v3) were reviewed over 2 years, and patient demographics, cytology diagnoses, results of ThyroSeq testing, and histopathologic diagnoses on resection (if available) were collected. RESULTS:One hundred eighty-five nodules were tested from 178 patients, including 94 nodules tested with v2 and 91 nodules tested with v3. Overall, 28 of 185 nodules (15%) yielded a high-risk or intermediate-high-risk mutation (HRM). Of the patients with these nodules, 19 of 25 (76%) had neoplastic nodules, and 11 of 25 (44%) had a malignancy or a noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). Only 16 of 147 nodules (11%) that were negative or had low-risk genetic alterations underwent resection, with 1 false-negative result (a papillary thyroid carcinoma tested with v2). No false-negative results were identified with v3. Two nodules had TP53 mutations identified, both of which were benign on resection. Nodules with HRM that were tested with v2 and v3 had a positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy of 57% and 39%, respectively, and a PPV for neoplasm of 86% and 72%, respectively. The negative predictive values for v2 and v3 were 92% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS:The PPV of an HRM result on ThyroSeq v3 was low for malignancy or NIFTP, and the PPV for neoplasm was higher. RAS-type mutations were the most commonly identified in both benign and malignant nodules. Thyroseq v3 had a lower PPV for both malignancy/NIFTP and neoplasm than v2 but did not produce any false-negative results.
Authors
Jug, R; Foo, W-C; Jones, C; Ahmadi, S; Jiang, XS
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438536
PMID
32339438
Source
epmc
Published In
Cancer Cytopathology
Volume
128
Published Date
Start Page
563
End Page
569
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22283

Hurthle cell predominance impacts results of Afirma gene expression classifier and ThyroSeq molecular panel performance in indeterminate thyroid nodules.

BACKGROUND: Molecular tests such as the Afirma gene expression classifier (GEC) and mutational panels (such as ThyroSeq) have been introduced to help risk stratify cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules with the aim to reduce the number of unnecessary thyroidectomies. Some reports have suggested that samples with Hurthle cell predominance have higher false-positive rates on GEC testing, but data are limited. METHODS: We reviewed thyroid nodules with indeterminate (Bethesda III/IV) cytology at our institution. Patient demographics, cytologic and histologic diagnoses (where available), and molecular test results were collected. RESULTS: GEC was performed on 202 nodules, and ThyroSeq was performed on 81 nodules. In the GEC cohort, 66% of nodules with Hurthle cell predominance yielded "suspicious" result vs 46% of nodules without Hurthle cell predominance, with risk of malignancy (ROM) for surgically resected nodules of 16% and 33%, respectively. In ThyroSeq cohort, 8% of nodules with Hurthle cell predominance yielded a high-risk mutation vs 19% of nodules without Hurthle cell predominance, with ROM of 50% and 33%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: For ThyroSeq molecular panel, while it did not appear that there was an increase in rate of high-risk mutations detected in the samples with Hurthle cell predominance, small numbers limit the generalizability of these results. For the GEC cohort, indeterminate thyroid nodules with predominance of Hurthle cells showed an increased rate of "suspicious" results compared to samples without Hurthle cell predominance. The ROM for GEC "suspicious" nodules with Hurthle cell predominance on surgical resection was lower in our study. Repeat FNA may be of use in patients with these types of nodules. In the context of a Hurthle cell predominant lesion, positive results on molecular testing may not carry a high rate of malignancy.
Authors
Parajuli, S; Jug, R; Ahmadi, S; Jiang, XS
MLA Citation
Parajuli, Shobha, et al. “Hurthle cell predominance impacts results of Afirma gene expression classifier and ThyroSeq molecular panel performance in indeterminate thyroid nodules.Diagn Cytopathol, vol. 47, no. 11, Nov. 2019, pp. 1177–83. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/dc.24290.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402723
PMID
31348619
Source
pubmed
Published In
Diagn Cytopathol
Volume
47
Published Date
Start Page
1177
End Page
1183
DOI
10.1002/dc.24290

Innovations: Brave new worlds.

Authors
Jiang, XS; Madrigal, E
MLA Citation
Jiang, Xiaoyin Sara, and Emilio Madrigal. “Innovations: Brave new worlds.Cancer Cytopathol, vol. 127, no. 8, Aug. 2019, pp. 491–92. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncy.22141.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1396149
PMID
31150154
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Cytopathol
Volume
127
Published Date
Start Page
491
End Page
492
DOI
10.1002/cncy.22141

Research Areas:

Cytopathology
Needle biopsy
Pathology
Pathology, Molecular
Pathology, Oral
Pathology, Surgical
Social Media
Thyroid Neoplasms
Thyroid Nodule