Arif Kamal

Overview:

health services and outcomes research, information-technology enabled registries, supportive oncology and palliative care, quality assessment and improvement

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Core Faculty in Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2005

University of Missouri Kansas City, School of Medicine

M.H.S. 2015

Duke University

M.B.A. 2016

University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Resident, Internal Medicine

Mayo Clinic, Alix School of Medicine

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Mayo Clinic, Alix School of Medicine

Grants:

Validating TOGETHER CARE, a mobile application ("app") for caregivers to implement home-based follow-up care for cancer survivors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Medable Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Randomized Trial of Stepped Palliative Care versus Early Integrated Palliative Care in Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Massachusetts General Hospital
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Developing and testing a web-based tool to engage advanced cancer patients in palliative care (PCforMe-Upstream)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Mayo Clinic
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Which palliative care quality measures improve patient-centered outcome?

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Cambia Health Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Development of national registry for patients receiving primary care in the home

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
University of California - San Francisco
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Addressing Issues of Cancer Disparities, Equity, and Inclusion Through Systemized Quality Improvement.

Authors
MLA Citation
Kamal, Arif H., et al. “Addressing Issues of Cancer Disparities, Equity, and Inclusion Through Systemized Quality Improvement.Jco Oncol Pract, vol. 17, no. 8, Aug. 2021, pp. 461–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/OP.21.00282.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488180
PMID
34181463
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
461
End Page
462
DOI
10.1200/OP.21.00282

Inpatient palliative care utilization for patients with brain metastases.

Introduction: Given the high symptom burden and complex clinical decision making associated with a diagnosis of brain metastases (BM), specialty palliative care (PC) can meaningfully improve patient quality of life. However, no prior study has formally evaluated patient-specific factors associated with PC consultation among BM patients. Methods: We examined the rates of PC consults in a cohort of 1303 patients with BM admitted to three tertiary medical centers from October 2015 to December 2018. Patient demographics, surgical status, 30-day readmission, and death data were collected via retrospective chart review. PC utilization was assessed by identifying encounters for which an inpatient consult to PC was placed. Statistical analyses were performed to compare characteristics and outcomes between patients who did and did not receive PC consults. Results: We analyzed 1303 patients admitted to the hospital with BM. The average overall rate of inpatient PC consultation was 19.6%. Rates of PC utilization differed significantly by patient race (17.5% in White/Caucasian vs 26.0% in Black/African American patients, P = .0014). Patients who received surgery during their admission had significantly lower rates of PC consultation (3.9% vs 22.4%, P < .0001). Patients who either died during their admission or were discharged to hospice had significantly higher rates of PC than those who were discharged home or to rehabilitation (P < .0001). Conclusions: In our dataset, PC consultation rates varied by patient demographic, surgical status, discharging service, and practice setting. Further work is needed to identify the specific barriers to optimally utilizing specialty PC in this population.
Authors
Price, M; Howell, EP; Dalton, T; Ramirez, L; Howell, C; Williamson, T; Fecci, PE; Anders, CK; Check, DK; Kamal, AH; Goodwin, CR
MLA Citation
Price, Meghan, et al. “Inpatient palliative care utilization for patients with brain metastases.Neurooncol Pract, vol. 8, no. 4, Aug. 2021, pp. 441–50. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/nop/npab016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488917
PMID
34277022
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Practice
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
441
End Page
450
DOI
10.1093/nop/npab016

Differences Between For-profit and Non-profit Hospice Agencies in the US Medicare Population.

Authors
Bhatia, V; Huang, Y; Meier, DE; Kamal, AH; Warraich, HJ
MLA Citation
Bhatia, Vipul, et al. “Differences Between For-profit and Non-profit Hospice Agencies in the US Medicare Population.J Gen Intern Med, July 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11606-021-06982-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487926
PMID
34236604
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Gen Intern Med
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s11606-021-06982-4

Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Oncologist Burnout, Emotional Well-Being, and Moral Distress: Considerations for the Cancer Organization's Response for Readiness, Mitigation, and Resilience.

Authors
Hlubocky, FJ; Symington, BE; McFarland, DC; Gallagher, CM; Dragnev, KH; Burke, JM; Lee, RT; El-Jawahri, A; Popp, B; Rosenberg, AR; Thompson, MA; Dizon, DS; Srivastava, P; Patel, MI; Kamal, AH; Daugherty, CK; Back, AL; Dokucu, ME; Shanafelt, TD
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1474202
PMID
33555934
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
365
End Page
374
DOI
10.1200/OP.20.00937

Importance of quality-of-life priorities and preferences surrounding treatment decision making in patients with cancer and oncology clinicians.

BACKGROUND: Shared decision-making (SDM) occurs when a patient partners with their oncologist to integrate personal preferences and values into treatment decisions. A key component of SDM is the elicitation of patient preferences and values, yet little is known about how and when these are elicited, communicated, prioritized, and documented within clinical encounters. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated nationwide data collected by CancerCare to better understand current patterns of SDM between patients and their oncology clinicians. Patient surveys included questions about the importance of quality-of-life preferences and discussions regarding quality-of-life priorities with their clinicians. Clinician surveys included questions about the discussion of quality-of-life priorities and preferences with patients, the effect of quality-of-life priorities on treatment recommendations, and quality-of-life priority documentation in practice. RESULTS: Patient survey completers (n = 320; 33% response rate) were predominantly women (95%), had a diagnosis of breast cancer (59%), or were receiving active cancer treatment (59%). Clinician survey completers (n = 112; 5% response rate) predominately identified as hematologists or oncologists (66%). Although 67% of clinicians reported knowing their patients' personal quality-of-life priorities and preferences before finalizing treatment plans, only 37% of patients reported that these discussions occurred before treatment initiation. Most patients (95%) considered out-of-pocket expenses important during treatment planning, yet only 59% reported discussing out-of-pocket expenses with their clinician before finalizing treatment plans. A majority of clinicians (52%) considered clinic questionnaires as feasible to document quality-of-life priorities and preferences. CONCLUSIONS: Patients and clinicians reported that preferences related to quality-of-life should be considered in treatment decision making, yet barriers to SDM, preference elicitation, and documentation remain.
Authors
Williams, CP; Miller-Sonet, E; Nipp, RD; Kamal, AH; Love, S; Rocque, GB
MLA Citation
Williams, Courtney P., et al. “Importance of quality-of-life priorities and preferences surrounding treatment decision making in patients with cancer and oncology clinicians.Cancer, vol. 126, no. 15, Aug. 2020, pp. 3534–41. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32961.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441162
PMID
32426870
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
3534
End Page
3541
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32961