Michael Lidsky

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 2004

University of California - San Diego

M.D. 2009

Georgetown University School of Medicine

General Surgery Resident, Surgery

Duke University School of Medicine

Complex General Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery Fellow, Surgery

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Grants:

Improving Outcome in Patients with Advanced Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: A Randomized Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Regional Floxuridine (FUDR)

Administered By
Surgical Oncology
Awarded By
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Outcome in Patients with Advanced Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: A Randomized Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Regional Floxuridine (FUDR)

Awarded By
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Combined Primary Resection with Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump Implantation Is Safe for Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases.

BACKGROUND: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) are the most common cause of disease-specific mortality in patients with colorectal cancer. Hepatic artery infusion (HAI) combined with systemic chemotherapy improves survival for these patients. The safety of colorectal resection at the time of HAI pump placement has not been well established. METHODS: Patients with CRLM who underwent combined HAI pump placement and colorectal (primary) resection or HAI pump placement alone were evaluated for perioperative outcomes, pump-specific complications, infectious complications, and time to treatment initiation. These outcomes were compared using comparative statistics. RESULTS: Patients who underwent combined HAI pump placement and primary resection (n = 19) vs HAI pump placement alone (n = 13) had similar demographics and rates of combined hepatectomy. Combined HAI pump placement and primary resection group had similar operative time and blood loss (both p = NS), but longer length of stay (6 vs 4 days, p = 0.02) compared to pump placement alone. Overall postoperative complications (21% vs 8%) and pump-specific complications (16% vs 31%) were similar (both p = NS). Infection rates were not different between groups, nor was time to initiation of HAI therapy (19 vs 16 days p = NS), or systemic therapy (34 vs 35 days p = NS). CONCLUSION: Combining colorectal resection with HAI pump implantation is a safe surgical approach for management of unresectable CRLM. Postoperative complications, specifically infectious complications, were not increased, nor was there a delay to initiation of HAI or systemic chemotherapy. Investigation of long-term oncologic outcomes for HAI pump placement and primary tumor resection in patients with unresectable CRLM is ongoing.
Authors
Turley, MC; Moore, C; Creasy, JM; Sharib, J; Lan, B; Thacker, JKM; Migaly, J; Zani, S; Allen, PJ; Mantyh, CR; Lidsky, ME
MLA Citation
Turley, Megan C., et al. “Combined Primary Resection with Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump Implantation Is Safe for Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases.J Gastrointest Surg, vol. 26, no. 4, Apr. 2022, pp. 764–71. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11605-021-05195-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502476
PMID
34820727
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Gastrointest Surg
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
764
End Page
771
DOI
10.1007/s11605-021-05195-8

Surgical resection is associated with improved long-term survival of patients with resectable pancreatic head cancer compared to multiagent chemotherapy.

BACKGROUND: Standard of care for resectable pancreatic cancer is a combination of surgical resection (SR) and multiagent chemotherapy (MCT). We aim to determine whether SR or MCT is associated with superior survival for patients receiving only single-modality therapy. METHODS: Patients with stage I-IIb pancreatic head adenocarcinoma who received either MCT or SR were identified in the NCDB (2013-2015). Following a piecewise approach to estimating hazards over the course of follow-up, conditional overall survival (OS) at 30, 60, and 90 days after treatment initiation was estimated using landmark analyses. RESULTS: 3103 patients received MCT alone (60.3%) and 2043 underwent SR alone (39.7%). SR had an OS disadvantage at 30 (HR 3.99, 95% CI 3.12-5.11) and 60 days (HR 1.85, 95% CI 1.4-2.45), but an OS advantage after 90 days (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.55-0.64). In a landmark analysis conditioned on 90 days survival post treatment initiation, median OS was improved for SR (17.0 vs. 12.2 months, p < 0.0001); SR improved 3-year OS by 21.3% (p < 0.05), despite patients being older (median 72 vs. 67 years, p < 0.0001) with higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity scores (≥2: 11.2 vs. 8.6%, p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: For patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, SR is associated with superior long-term survival compared to MCT.
Authors
Landa, K; Schmitz, R; Farrow, NE; Rushing, C; Niedzwiecki, D; Cerullo, M; Herbert, GS; Shah, KN; Zani, S; Blazer, DG; Allen, PJ; Lidsky, ME
MLA Citation
Landa, Karenia, et al. “Surgical resection is associated with improved long-term survival of patients with resectable pancreatic head cancer compared to multiagent chemotherapy.Hpb (Oxford), vol. 24, no. 7, July 2022, pp. 1153–61. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.hpb.2021.12.007.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1505859
PMID
34987008
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hpb (Oxford)
Volume
24
Published Date
Start Page
1153
End Page
1161
DOI
10.1016/j.hpb.2021.12.007

Empiric nasogastric decompression after pancreaticoduodenectomy is not necessary.

BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of routine NGT decompression after PD on postoperative outcomes in the era of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients undergoing PD between January 2015 and October 2017 at our institution was performed comparing routine post-operative NGT decompression versus omission. The incidence of delayed gastric emptying, post-operative pancreatic fistula, hospital length of stay, operative time, 30-day readmission rate as well the time to first oral intake were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of 149 patients who underwent PD, 65 maintained post-operative NGT decompression while post-operative NGT decompression was omitted in 84 patients. No differences were noted in delayed gastric emptying rates (both p>0.05). The median length of stay (9 days for NGT group versus 8.5 days for no NGT group) and 30-day readmission rates (13.8% versus 15.5%, respectively) were similar (p=0.781). Compared with patients who had routine post-operative NGT placed, those who had omission of a post-operative NGT had a lower need for reinsertion, shorter time to PO intake, and a lower likelihood of extended length of stay. CONCLUSIONS: In the era of ERAS protocols, we observed no association between routine post-operative NGT decompression after PD and improved postoperative outcomes.
Authors
Moris, D; Lim, JJ; Cerullo, M; Schmitz, R; Shah, KN; Blazer, DG; Lidsky, ME; Allen, PJ; Zani, S
MLA Citation
Moris, Dimitrios, et al. “Empiric nasogastric decompression after pancreaticoduodenectomy is not necessary.Hpb (Oxford), vol. 23, no. 12, Dec. 2021, pp. 1906–13. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.hpb.2021.05.004.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1485958
PMID
34154924
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hpb (Oxford)
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
1906
End Page
1913
DOI
10.1016/j.hpb.2021.05.004

Hepatic Arterial Infusion Pumps: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) entails the surgical implantation of a subcutaneous pump to deliver chemotherapeutic agents directly to the liver in the setting of primary or secondary liver cancer. The purpose of HAI chemotherapy is to maximize hepatic drug concentrations while minimizing systemic toxicity, facilitating more effective treatment. HAI is used in combination with systemic chemotherapy and can be considered in several clinical scenarios, including adjuvant therapy, conversion of unresectable disease to resectable disease, and unresectable disease. Radiologists are key members of the multidisciplinary team involved in the selection and management of these patients with complex liver disease. As these devices begin to be used at more sites across the country, radiologists should become familiar with the guiding principles behind pump placement, expected imaging appearances of these devices, and potential associated complications. The authors provide an overview of HAI therapy, with a focus on the key imaging findings associated with this treatment that radiologists may encounter. ©RSNA, 2021.
Authors
Napier, KJ; Lidsky, ME; James, OG; Wildman-Tobriner, B
MLA Citation
Napier, Kyle J., et al. “Hepatic Arterial Infusion Pumps: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.Radiographics, vol. 41, no. 3, May 2021, pp. 895–908. Pubmed, doi:10.1148/rg.2021200130.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1477613
PMID
33769890
Source
pubmed
Published In
Radiographics
Volume
41
Published Date
Start Page
895
End Page
908
DOI
10.1148/rg.2021200130

Short-Term Risk of Performing Concurrent Procedures with Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump Placement.

BACKGROUND: Hepatic artery infusion pump (HAIP) chemotherapy is an advanced cancer therapy for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. The risk of concurrent hepatic and/or colorectal operations with HAIP placement is unknown. Our objective was to characterize the short-term outcomes of concurrent surgery with HAIP placement. METHODS: The 2005-2017 ACS NSQIP dataset was queried for patients undergoing hepatic and colorectal operations with or without HAIP placement. Outcomes were compared for HAIP placement with different combined procedures. Patients who underwent procedures without HAIP placement were propensity score matched with those with HAIP placement. The primary outcome was 30-day death or serious morbidity (DSM). Secondary outcomes included infectious complications, wound complications, length of stay (LOS), and operative time. RESULTS: Of 467 patients who underwent HAIP placement, 83.9% had concurrent surgery. The rate of DSM was 10.7% for HAIP placement alone, 19.2% with concurrent minor hepatic procedures, 22.1% with concurrent colorectal resection, 23.2% with concurrent minor hepatic plus colorectal procedures, 28.4% with concurrent major hepatic resection, and 41.7% with concurrent major hepatic plus colorectal resection. On matched analyses, there was no difference in DSM, infectious, or wound complications for procedures with HAIP placement compared with the additional procedure alone, but operative time (294.7 vs 239.8 min, difference 54.9, 95% CI 42.8-67.0) and LOS (6 vs 5, IRR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08-1.33) were increased. CONCLUSIONS: HAIP placement is not associated with additional morbidity when performed with hepatic and/or colorectal surgery. Decisions regarding HAIP placement should consider the risks of concurrent operations, and patient- and disease-specific factors.
Authors
Brajcich, BC; Bentrem, DJ; Yang, AD; Cohen, ME; Ellis, RJ; Mahalingam, D; Mulcahy, MF; Lidsky, ME; Allen, PJ; Merkow, RP
MLA Citation
Brajcich, Brian C., et al. “Short-Term Risk of Performing Concurrent Procedures with Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump Placement.Ann Surg Oncol, vol. 27, no. 13, Dec. 2020, pp. 5098–106. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-020-08938-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1457345
PMID
32740732
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
5098
End Page
5106
DOI
10.1245/s10434-020-08938-0

Research Areas:

Muser Mentor