Nia Mitchell

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, General Internal Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2005

Washington University School of Medicine

M.P.H. 2010

University of Colorado School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency

University of Colorado School of Medicine

Primary Care Research Fellowship

University of Colorado School of Medicine

Grants:

Changes in Weight and Physical Function for Older African American Women in National, Peer-Led, Community-Based Weight Loss Program

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Evaluation of Low Cost National Weight Loss Program in Underserved

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Changes in Weight and Physical Function for Older African American Women in National, Peer-Led, Community-Based Weight Loss Program

Administered By
Medicine, General Internal Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Ketogenic Diet for Obesity and Diabetes.

Authors
Yancy, WS; Mitchell, NS; Westman, EC
MLA Citation
Yancy, William S., et al. “Ketogenic Diet for Obesity and Diabetes.Jama Intern Med, vol. 179, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 1734–35. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5148.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423329
PMID
31790530
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Internal Medicine
Volume
179
Published Date
Start Page
1734
End Page
1735
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5148

In situ analysis of protein chromatography and column efficiency using magnetic resonance imaging.

Magnetic resonance imaging has been used to visualize size-based protein separations inside operating chromatography columns. The effects of flow nonuniformity have been observed and analyzed quantitatively through concentration profiles of tracers measured inside the column. Analysis of these profiles provides local and averaged intracolumn plate height values for characterization of dispersion and flow nonuniformity. The magnetic resonance measurements compare favorably with conventional chromatographic measurements of column efficiency and provide more detailed insights into nonideal column performance.
Authors
Mitchell, NS; Hagel, L; Fernandez, EJ
MLA Citation
Mitchell, N. S., et al. “In situ analysis of protein chromatography and column efficiency using magnetic resonance imaging.J Chromatogr A, vol. 779, no. 1–2, Aug. 1997, pp. 73–89. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/s0021-9673(97)00457-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1271088
PMID
9335119
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Chromatography. A
Volume
779
Published Date
Start Page
73
End Page
89
DOI
10.1016/s0021-9673(97)00457-3

Are low-carbohydrate diets safe in diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease?

Diabetes mellitus and obesity both contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetic kidney disease (DKD), and they can accelerate the loss of kidney function. Dietary intake can potentially have wide-reaching effects on the risk of CKD/DKD and their progression by reducing weight and blood pressure, improving glycemic control, reducing hyperfiltration, and modulating inflammation. Low-carbohydrate (LC) diets can reduce weight and improve glycemic control, but the relatively higher protein content also raises concern in CKD/DKD. Empiric evidence supporting the kidney-related benefits or risks of LC diets is needed to understand the balance of these potential harms and benefits for patients with DKD and is the subject of our review.
Authors
Mitchell, NS; Scialla, JJ; Yancy, WS
MLA Citation
Mitchell, Nia S., et al. “Are low-carbohydrate diets safe in diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease?Ann N Y Acad Sci, vol. 1461, no. 1, Feb. 2020, pp. 25–36. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/nyas.13997.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1365375
PMID
30644556
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann N Y Acad Sci
Volume
1461
Published Date
Start Page
25
End Page
36
DOI
10.1111/nyas.13997

Factors Associated with Achievement of Clinically Significant Weight Loss by Women in a National Nonprofit Weight Loss Program.

BACKGROUND: Clinically significant weight loss (CSWL) is ≥5% of initial weight. The purpose of the study is to determine factors associated with women achieving CSWL in Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a national, nonprofit weight loss program. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of 48,674 females who joined TOPS from 2005 to 2011 and had a birth date in the database. Predictors of CSWL were evaluated using log-binomial regression and adjusted relative risks [99% CI] for participant age, initial weight, number of members per chapter, and chapter age. RESULTS: Older women were more likely to achieve CSWL, with women ≥70 years 1.23 (1.18, 1.28) times more likely to achieve CSWL compared to women 18 to <45 years. Women who weighed 113 to <136 kg and ≥136 kg were 1.06 (1.02, 1.10) and 1.07 (1.02, 1.14) times more likely to achieve CSWL compared to women <80 kg, respectively. Women in chapters with 25 to <35 members and ≥35 members more were 1.09 (1.05, 1.13) and 1.14 (1.10, 1.18) times more likely to achieve CSWL than those in chapters with less than 15 members. Women in older chapters were less likely to achieve CSWL, with women in chapters 10 to 20 years old 0.95 (0.92, 0.99) times as likely to lose weight as those in chapters less than 10 years old. CONCLUSIONS: Women in TOPS were more likely to achieve CSWL if older, ≥113 kg, and in larger, newer chapters. Future studies should address ways to modify the program to improve achievement of CSWL.
Authors
Mitchell, NS; Furniss, AL; Helmkamp, LJ; Van Pelt, RE
MLA Citation
Mitchell, Nia S., et al. “Factors Associated with Achievement of Clinically Significant Weight Loss by Women in a National Nonprofit Weight Loss Program.J Womens Health (Larchmt), vol. 26, no. 8, Aug. 2017, pp. 911–17. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/jwh.2016.6264.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1272996
PMID
28686527
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Womens Health (Larchmt)
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
911
End Page
917
DOI
10.1089/jwh.2016.6264

Time to RE-AIM: Why Community Weight Loss Programs Should Be Included in Academic Obesity Research.

Despite decades of efficacy-based research on weight loss interventions, the obesity epidemic in the United States persists, especially in underserved populations. We used the RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy/Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) framework to describe the limitations of the current paradigm of efficacy-based research for weight loss interventions. We also used RE-AIM to propose that existing weight loss interventions (community-based programs) such as Jenny Craig, Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), and Weight Watchers be studied to supplement the efficacy-based research approaches to achieve population-level impact on obesity.
Authors
Mitchell, NS; Prochazka, AV; Glasgow, RE
MLA Citation
Mitchell, Nia S., et al. “Time to RE-AIM: Why Community Weight Loss Programs Should Be Included in Academic Obesity Research.Prev Chronic Dis, vol. 13, Mar. 2016, p. E37. Pubmed, doi:10.5888/pcd13.150436.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1268130
PMID
26986540
Source
pubmed
Published In
Preventing Chronic Disease
Volume
13
Published Date
Start Page
E37
DOI
10.5888/pcd13.150436