Devon Noonan

Overview:

Dr. Noonan is a nurse scientist, certified addictions nurse and an Associate Professor in the Duke School of Nursing. She received her BSN at Boston College, her MS in Nursing at Georgetown University, her MPH and PhD at the University of Virginia and completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan. Dr. Noonan’s research is focused on using community-engaged approaches to develop innovative health behavior change interventions, including digital interventions, with the goal of reducing risk for chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Dr. Noonan’s work has a strong focus on rural and medically underserved populations. Much of her work also focuses on tobacco cessation. She has been continuously funded by NCI for the past 5 years to examine text-based intervention approaches for tobacco cessation in rural and medically underserved populations. Dr. Noonan teaches and mentors students across all programs at DUSON and is the Co-Director of the Duke National Clinician Scholars Program.

Positions:

Dorothy L. Powell Term Chair of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 2008

University of Virginia

Ph.D. 2010

University of Virginia

Grants:

The Cutting E.D.G.E. (Empowering Dads to Guide and Educate): A nurse driven mobile application to promote father-son sexual health communication and healthy sexual behaviors among Black male adolescents in the United States South

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Goals for Reaching Optimal Wellness: GROWell

Administered By
School of Nursing
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Stress Cardiovascular Disease and the Superwoman Schema

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
Sigma Theta Tau International
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Developing Community Healthworker Innovation Toolkit

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

Goals for Reaching Optimal Wellness: GROWell

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
University of California - Davis
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Goals for Reaching Optimal Wellness (GROWell): A clinical trial protocol of a digital dietary intervention for pregnant and postpartum people with prenatal overweight or obesity.

<h4>Background</h4>Excess gestational weight gain (EGWG) is associated with multiple pregnancy complications and health risks for birthing people and their infants. Likewise, postpartum weight retention (PPWR), or not losing all pregnancy weight, has long-term health consequences. EGWG among people who enter pregnancy with overweight or obesity have worse obstetric outcomes and increased PPWR compared to women who gain within Institute of Medicine guidelines.<h4>Methods</h4>This study protocol describes the details of a blinded, randomized clinical trial of GROWell: Goals for Reaching Optimal Wellness, a mHealth tool designed to improve diet quality among people who enter pregnancy with overweight or obese BMIs to help them achieve appropriate GWG and safe postpartum pregnancy weight loss. Individuals with overweight and obesity will be randomly assigned to an attention control or intervention arm. The intervention group will receive personalized, goal-oriented text messages regarding dietary choices, while the attention control group will receive text messages about healthy pregnancy, labor, delivery, and early infancy. Both groups will complete online surveys at baseline, follow up, 3 and 6 months postpartum.<h4>Results and discussion</h4>Currently, 162 subjects have been enrolled. Outcomes associated with GWG and pregnancy are expected in late 2023, while outcomes on postpartum weight retention GROWell adherence are expected in late 2024. The results of this trial will support the use of an evidence-based mHealth tool to be integrated into clinical practice to reduce EGWG and PPWR among pregnant people with overweight and obese BMIs, a resource that is currently lacking.<h4>Trial registration</h4>ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT04449432. Registered on June 26, 2020.
Authors
Simmons, LA; Phipps, JE; Overstreet, C; Smith, PM; Bechard, E; Liu, S; Walker, C; Noonan, D
MLA Citation
Simmons, Leigh Ann, et al. “Goals for Reaching Optimal Wellness (GROWell): A clinical trial protocol of a digital dietary intervention for pregnant and postpartum people with prenatal overweight or obesity.Contemporary Clinical Trials, vol. 113, Feb. 2022, p. 106627. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.cct.2021.106627.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503025
PMID
34813963
Source
epmc
Published In
Contemporary Clinical Trials
Volume
113
Published Date
Start Page
106627
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2021.106627

Implementing the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale on an Inpatient Oncology Unit.

<h4>Background</h4>Symptom distress places a burden on patients and their families, but it is often not captured in nursing documentation. Using a symptom management tool, such as the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (CMSAS), can assist in this capture and link patients to resources.<h4>Objectives</h4>The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to implement the CMSAS and capture symptom burden to create a streamlined method of documentation.<h4>Methods</h4>A QI pilot was conducted on an inpatient oncology unit implementing the CMSAS. Then, surveys were provided to the patients to complete at admission and discharge. The most distressing symptoms patients reported were added into the electronic health record nursing care plan that automatically uploaded interventions based on ONS Guidelines™.<h4>Findings</h4>Patient (N = 73) symptom distress was quickly tracked, and there were no statistically significant changes in patient distress from admission to discharge, except for two symptoms.
Authors
MLA Citation
Englehart, Valerie, et al. “Implementing the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale on an Inpatient Oncology Unit.Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, vol. 26, no. 1, Feb. 2022, pp. E1–6. Epmc, doi:10.1188/22.cjon.e1-e6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1507191
PMID
35073294
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
E1
End Page
E6
DOI
10.1188/22.cjon.e1-e6

Trajectories of Situational Temptations in Pregnant Smokers participating in a Scheduled Gradual Reduction Cessation Trial.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper was to examine changes in situational temptations to smoke among women in early to late pregnancy enrolled in a texting trial to help them quit smoking. We compared changes between (1) intervention arms, (2) those who quit, (3) those who reduced by 50% or more, and (4) those who reduced by less than 50%. We also examined cravings overtime in the intervention arm and the relationship between real-time cravings assessed via text message and situational temptations. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of the Baby Steps trial, a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a text-based scheduled gradual reduction (SGR) intervention on cessation. We used t-tests to examine changes across intervention arms and repeated measured proc mixed to explore changes in situational temptations and cravings. RESULTS: Among all women, situational temptations decreased from early to late pregnancy for the positive, negative, and habitual subscales, (ps < 0.001). We found no difference in situational temptations across arms. We found a positive relationship between negative situational temptation and average craving during the Weeks 2 and Weeks 3 of the intervention. Negative ST increased by 0.11 for each unit increase of craving at Week 2. CONCLUSIONS: As women progress through pregnancy their temptation to smoke reduces. A different relationship might exist, however with negative affect situations in which women reported higher craving but not in response to other temptations. Future work might have a particular focus on the intersection of negative affect with cravings and temptations to promote cessation during pregnancy. CLINICAL TRIAL: NCT01995097.
Authors
Noonan, D; Lyna, P; Kennedy, DL; Gao, X; Bejarano Hernandez, S; Fish, LJ; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Noonan, Devon, et al. “Trajectories of Situational Temptations in Pregnant Smokers participating in a Scheduled Gradual Reduction Cessation Trial.Matern Child Health J, vol. 26, no. 1, Jan. 2022, pp. 24–30. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10995-021-03321-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502808
PMID
34860350
Source
pubmed
Published In
Matern Child Health J
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
24
End Page
30
DOI
10.1007/s10995-021-03321-1

Impact of Depression and Nicotine Dependence on Executive Functioning in Rural Older Adult Smokers: A Brief Report (NCT02510716).

<h4>Introduction</h4>Rural older adults are an underserved population with high rates of smoking and related morbidity and mortality. Age-related executive function deficits are common in older smokers; however, the association of depression and nicotine dependence on executive function has not been explored. This study addressed whether depression and nicotine dependence are related to executive dysfunction in rural older adult smokers.<h4>Methods</h4>The sample included 40 rural older adults recruited from two primary care clinics in North Carolina. Executive function was evaluated with the Behavioral Regulation Index (BRI), Metacognition Index, and Global Executive Composite (GEC) T scores from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult. Nicotine dependence and depression symptoms were assessed using the Fagerstrom Test and Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale-10, respectively. Analysis of variance was used to explore whether depression and/or nicotine dependence influences executive function. Nondirectional tests were performed with significance set at .10.<h4>Results</h4>Smokers who screened positive for depression had significantly greater executive dysfunction than those who did not (BRI: p = .0003, Metacognition Index: p < .0001, GEC: p < .0001), and moderate/high dependence was associated with greater executive function deficits compared with those with mild dependence (BRI: p = .0942). Together, depression and nicotine dependence explained 50% of the variability of the GEC overall scores.<h4>Conclusions</h4>Executive dysfunction is common in rural older adult smokers and associated with depression and nicotine dependence severity. Futures studies should test the relationship of executive function and smoking cessation in the older adult population as it may have implications for cessation in this population.
Authors
Noonan, D; Silva, NJ; McClintock, SM; Silva, SG
MLA Citation
Noonan, Devon, et al. “Impact of Depression and Nicotine Dependence on Executive Functioning in Rural Older Adult Smokers: A Brief Report (NCT02510716).Journal of Addictions Nursing, vol. 32, no. 4, Oct. 2021, pp. 249–54. Epmc, doi:10.1097/jan.0000000000000436.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1504133
PMID
34855323
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Volume
32
Published Date
Start Page
249
End Page
254
DOI
10.1097/jan.0000000000000436

Effects of Smoking Reduction and Cessation on Birth Outcomes in a Scheduled Gradual Reduction Cessation Trial.

INTRODUCTION: Smoking during pregnancy can affect infant birthweight. We tested whether an intervention that promoted scheduled gradual reduction improved birth outcomes among pregnant women who smoked. We also examined race differences in birth outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a 2-arm randomized controlled trial where pregnant women who smoked received either SMS text-delivered scheduled gradual smoking reduction (SGR) program plus support texts or support messages only throughout their pregnancy. The outcomes for this paper were birth outcomes including birth weight and gestational age obtained from chart review. Analyses were conducted using chi-square and t-tests in SAS. RESULTS: We approached 2201 pregnant women with smoking history. Of the 314 women recruited into the study, 290 completed a medical release form (92%). We did not find any significant differences in birth outcomes by arm or race. The majority of participants reduced smoking by the 80%. Women who reduced more than 50% of their baseline cigarettes per day had a birth weight increase of 335 g compared to those that did not (p = 0.05). The presence of alcohol/drug use in prenatal visit notes was associated with low infant birth weight (p = 0.05). DISCUSSION: The scheduled gradual reduction intervention did not improve birth outcomes. Additional research is needed to help improve birth outcomes for pregnant women who engage in tobacco and illicit substance use. CLINICAL TRIAL #: NCT01995097.
Authors
Kennedy, DL; Lyna, P; Gao, X; Noonan, D; Bejarano Hernandez, S; Fish, LJ; Swamy, GK; Pollak, KI
MLA Citation
Kennedy, Danielle L., et al. “Effects of Smoking Reduction and Cessation on Birth Outcomes in a Scheduled Gradual Reduction Cessation Trial.Matern Child Health J, vol. 26, no. 5, May 2022, pp. 963–69. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10995-022-03386-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1511978
PMID
35235142
Source
pubmed
Published In
Matern Child Health J
Volume
26
Published Date
Start Page
963
End Page
969
DOI
10.1007/s10995-022-03386-6