Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences

Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
School of Medicine

Assistant Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.D.S. 2008

University of Benin (Nigeria)

M.P.H. 2012

Washington University in St. Louis

Ph.D. 2018

Saint Louis University

Grants:

Depression, suicide and suicide mitigation implementation in head and neck cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Depression, suicide and suicide mitigation implementation in head and neck cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The Affordable Care Act and suicide incidence among adults with cancer.

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer are at an increased suicide risk, and socioeconomic deprivation may further exacerbate that risk. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded insurance coverage options for low-income individuals and mandated coverage of mental health care. Our objective was to quantify associations of the ACA with suicide incidence among patients with cancer. METHODS: We identified US patients with cancer aged 18-74 years diagnosed with cancer from 2011 to 2016 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The primary outcome was the 1-year incidence of suicide based on cumulative incidence analyses. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses compared changes in suicide incidence from 2011-2013 (pre-ACA) to 2014-2016 (post-ACA) in Medicaid expansion relative to non-expansion states. We conducted falsification tests with 65-74-year-old patients with cancer, who are Medicare-eligible and not expected to benefit from ACA provisions. RESULTS: We identified 1,263,717 patients with cancer, 812 of whom died by suicide. In DID analyses, there was no change in suicide incidence after 2014 in Medicaid expansion vs. non-expansion states for nonelderly (18-64 years) patients with cancer (p = .41), but there was a decrease in suicide incidence among young adults (18-39 years) (- 64.36 per 100,000, 95% CI =  - 125.96 to - 2.76, p = .041). There were no ACA-associated changes in suicide incidence among 65-74-year-old patients with cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We found an ACA-associated decrease in the incidence of suicide for some nonelderly patients with cancer, particularly young adults in Medicaid expansion vs. non-expansion states. Expanding access to health care may decrease the risk of suicide among cancer survivors.
Authors
Barnes, JM; Graboyes, EM; Adjei Boakye, E; Kent, EE; Scherrer, JF; Park, EM; Rosenstein, DL; Mowery, YM; Chino, JP; Brizel, DM; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Barnes, Justin M., et al. “The Affordable Care Act and suicide incidence among adults with cancer.J Cancer Surviv, Apr. 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11764-022-01205-z.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1515383
PMID
35368225
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Cancer Surviv
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s11764-022-01205-z

Incidence and trends in head and neck cancer among United States' pediatric, adolescent, and young adult population

Authors
Osazuwa-Peters, N; Christopher, KM; Simpson, MC; Desai, PB; Rohde, RL; Challapalli, SD; Hussaini, AS; Panth, N; Boakye, EA
MLA Citation
Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba, et al. “Incidence and trends in head and neck cancer among United States' pediatric, adolescent, and young adult population.” Cancer Research, vol. 80, no. 14, 2020, pp. 43–44.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453892
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cancer Research
Volume
80
Published Date
Start Page
43
End Page
44

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Trends in Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the US.

Authors
Tabibi, T; Barnes, JM; Shah, A; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Johnson, KJ; Brown, DS
MLA Citation
Tabibi, Tara, et al. “Human Papillomavirus Vaccination and Trends in Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the US.Jama Pediatr, vol. 176, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 313–16. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.4807.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1502713
PMID
34842903
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Pediatr
Volume
176
Published Date
Start Page
313
End Page
316
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.4807

Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on cost-related medication underuse in nonelderly adult cancer survivors.

BACKGROUND: Cost-related medication underuse (CRMU), a measure of access to care and financial burden, is prevalent among cancer survivors. The authors quantified the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on CRMU in nonelderly cancer survivors. METHODS: Using National Health Interview Survey data (2011-2017) for cancer survivors aged 18 to 74 years, the authors estimated changes in CRMU (defined as taking medication less than prescribed due to costs) before (2011-2013) to after (2015-2017) implementation of the ACA. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses estimated changes in CRMU after implementation of the ACA in low-income versus high-income cancer survivors, and nonelderly versus elderly cancer survivors. RESULTS: A total of 6176 cancer survivors aged 18 to 64 years and 4100 cancer survivors aged 65 to 74 years were identified. In DID analyses, there was an 8.33-percentage point (PP) (95% confidence interval, 3.06-13.6 PP; P = .002) decrease in CRMU for cancer survivors aged 18 to 64 years with income <250% of the federal poverty level (FPL) compared with those with income >400% of the FPL. There was a reduction for cancer survivors aged 55 to 64 years compared with those aged 65 to 74 years with income <400% of the FPL (-9.35 PP; 95% confidence interval, -15.6 to -3.14 PP [P = .003]). CONCLUSIONS: There was an ACA-associated reduction in CRMU noted among low-income, nonelderly cancer survivors. The ACA may improve health care access and affordability in this vulnerable population.
Authors
Barnes, JM; Johnson, KJ; Adjei Boakye, E; Sethi, RKV; Varvares, MA; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Barnes, Justin M., et al. “Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on cost-related medication underuse in nonelderly adult cancer survivors.Cancer, vol. 126, no. 12, June 2020, pp. 2892–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32836.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436194
PMID
32187662
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
126
Published Date
Start Page
2892
End Page
2899
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32836

Depression and Long-Term Prescription Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder: Implications for Pain Management in Cancer.

OPINION STATEMENT: Preventing depression in cancer patients on long-term opioid therapy should begin with depression screening before opioid initiation and repeated screening during treatment. In weighing the high morbidity of depression and opioid use disorder in patients with chronic cancer pain against a dearth of evidence-based therapies studied in this population, patients and clinicians are left to choose among imperfect but necessary treatment options. When possible, we advise engaging psychiatric and pain/palliative specialists through collaborative care models and recommending mindfulness and psychotherapy to all patients with significant depression alongside cancer pain. Medications for depression should be reserved for moderate to severe symptoms. We recommend escitalopram/citalopram or sertraline among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), or the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) duloxetine, venlafaxine, or desvenlafaxine if patients have a significant component of neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (consider nortriptyline or desipramine, which have better anticholinergic profiles) should be considered for patients who do not respond to or tolerate SSRI/SNRIs. Existing evidence is inadequate to definitively recommend methylphenidate or novel agents, such as ketamine or psilocybin, as adjunctive treatments for cancer-related depression and pain. Physicians who treat patients with cancer pain should utilize universal precautions to limit the risk of non-medical opioid use (non-medical opioid use). Patients should be screened for non-medical opioid use behaviors at initial consultation and at regular intervals during treatment using a non-judgmental approach that reduces stigma. Co-management with an addiction specialist may be indicated for patients at high risk of non-medical opioid use and opioid use disorder. Buprenorphine and methadone are indicated for the treatment of opioid use disorder, and while they have not been systematically studied for treatment of opioid use disorder in patients with cancer pain, they do provide analgesia for cancer pain. While an interdisciplinary team approach to manage psychological stress may be beneficial, this may not be possible for patients treated outside of comprehensive cancer centers.
Authors
Bates, N; Bello, JK; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Sullivan, MD; Scherrer, JF
MLA Citation
Bates, Nicole, et al. “Depression and Long-Term Prescription Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder: Implications for Pain Management in Cancer.Curr Treat Options Oncol, vol. 23, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 348–58. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11864-022-00954-4.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1512227
PMID
35254595
Source
pubmed
Published In
Current Treatment Options in Oncology
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
348
End Page
358
DOI
10.1007/s11864-022-00954-4