Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences

Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
School of Medicine

Assistant Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.D.S. 2008

University of Benin (Nigeria)

M.P.H. 2012

Washington University in St. Louis

Ph.D. 2018

Saint Louis University

Grants:

Depression, suicide and suicide mitigation implementation in head and neck cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Depression, suicide and suicide mitigation implementation in head and neck cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Long-term Opioid Therapy, Depression and Suicide Mortality Risk in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among teens before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.

It is unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake and which sociodemographic groups may have been most impacted. We aimed to assess differences in HPV vaccine uptake (initiation and completion) before and during the pandemic in the United States. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from the 2019 to 2020 National Immunization Surveys - Teen (NIS-Teen), comparing vaccine initiation and completion rates in 2019 vs. 2020, based on confirmed reports by a healthcare provider. Weighted logistic regression analysis estimated odds of vaccine initiation and completion for both adolescent and parental characteristics. There were 18,788 adolescents in 2019 and 20,162 in 2020. There was 3.6% increase in HPV vaccine initiation (71.5% vs. 75.1%) and a 4.4% in completion (54.2% vs. 58.6%) rates from 2019 to 2020. In 2020, Non-Hispanic White teens were significantly less likely to initiate (aOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.79) and complete (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.86) vaccine uptake compared with non-Hispanic Black teens. Additionally, teens who lived above the poverty line were also less likely to initiate HPV vaccination (aOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.80) or complete them (aOR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.90), compared to those who lived below the poverty line. During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, some historically advantaged socioeconomic groups such as those living above the poverty line were less likely to receive HPV vaccine. The impact of the pandemic on HPV vaccine uptake may transcend traditional access to care factors.
Authors
Abouelella, DK; Canick, JE; Barnes, JM; Rohde, RL; Watts, TL; Adjei Boakye, E; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Abouelella, Dina K., et al. “Human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among teens before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.Hum Vaccin Immunother, vol. 18, no. 7, Dec. 2022, p. 2148825. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/21645515.2022.2148825.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1558839
PMID
36484115
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hum Vaccin Immunother
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
2148825
DOI
10.1080/21645515.2022.2148825

Sociodemographic Differences in Patient-Reported Pain and Pain Management of Patients With Head and Neck Cancer in a Community Oncology Setting.

PURPOSE: While pain is prevalent among survivors of head and neck cancer (HNC), there is a lack of data on pain management in the community oncology setting. We described sociodemographic correlates and disparities associated with patient-reported pain among patients with HNC. METHODS: We used the 2017-2021 nationwide community oncology data set from Navigating Cancer, which included electronic patient-reported outcomes. We identified a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with HNC (N = 25,572), with ≥ 1 patient-reported pain event. We adjusted for demographic (sex, age, smoking history, marital status) and clinical (cancer site) factors associated with pain reporting and pain resolution by new pain prescription on the basis of race (White v non-White patients), using multivariate logistic regression models. RESULTS: Our analytic cohort included 2,331 patients, 90.58% White, 58.62% married, with an average age of 66.47 years. Of these, 857 patients (36.76%) reported ≥ 1 pain event during study period. Mean resolution time (in minutes) for pain incidents was significantly longer for White patients than non-White patients (99.6 ± 3.2 v 74.9 ± 7.2, P < .05). After adjusting for covariates, smoking was associated with a 25% increased odds of reporting pain incidents (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.52). There was no statistically significant difference in odds of pain reporting between White versus non-White patients (aOR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.30). However, White patients were significantly more likely to receive new prescription for pain than non-White patients (aOR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.09 to 5.86). CONCLUSION: We found racial differences in patient-reported pain management, with White patients significantly more likely to receive new pain prescriptions. As pain management is a mainstay in cancer care, equity in pain management is critical to optimize quality of life for patients with HNC.
Authors
Canick, JE; Bhardwaj, A; Patel, A; Kuziez, D; Larsen, R; Misra, S; Pearson, B; Smith, BD; Rohde, RL; Adjei Boakye, E; Kahmke, RR; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Canick, Julia E., et al. “Sociodemographic Differences in Patient-Reported Pain and Pain Management of Patients With Head and Neck Cancer in a Community Oncology Setting.Jco Oncol Pract, Dec. 2022, p. OP2200132. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/OP.22.00132.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1558882
PMID
36480772
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jco Oncol Pract
Published Date
Start Page
OP2200132
DOI
10.1200/OP.22.00132

Medical students' knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and HPV-associated head and neck cancer.

On the basis of their training, medical students are considered "the best case scenario" among university students in knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV). We evaluated differences in knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and head and neck cancer (HNC) among medical students. A previously validated questionnaire was completed by 247 medical students at a Midwestern university. Outcomes of interest were knowledge score for HPV and HPV vaccine, and HNC, derived from combining questionnaire items to form HPV knowledge and HNC scores, and analyzed using multivariate linear regression. Mean scores for HPV knowledge were 19.4 out of 26, and 7.2 out of 12 for HNC knowledge. In the final multivariate linear regression model, sex, race, and year of study were independently associated with HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge. Males had significantly lower HPV vaccine knowledge than females (β = -1.53; 95% CI: -2.53, -0.52), as did nonwhite students (β = -1.05; 95% CI: -2.07, -0.03). There was a gradient in HPV vaccine knowledge based on the year of study, highest among fourth year students (β = 6.75; 95% CI: 5.17, 8.33). Results were similar for factors associated with HNC knowledge, except for sex. HNC knowledge similarly increased based on year of study, highest for fourth year students (β = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.72, 3.29). Among medical students, gaps remain in knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and HPV-linked HNC. Male medical students have significantly lower knowledge of HPV. This highlights the need to increase medical student knowledge of HPV and HPV-linked HNC.
Authors
Du, EY; Adjei Boakye, E; Taylor, DB; Kuziez, D; Rohde, RL; Pannu, JS; Simpson, MC; Patterson, RH; Varvares, MA; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Du, Eric Y., et al. “Medical students' knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and HPV-associated head and neck cancer.Hum Vaccin Immunother, vol. 18, no. 6, Nov. 2022, p. 2109892. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/21645515.2022.2109892.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1534999
PMID
36070503
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hum Vaccin Immunother
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
2109892
DOI
10.1080/21645515.2022.2109892

Temporal trends in oropharyngeal cancer incidence, survival, and cancer-directed surgery among elderly Americans.

<h4>Objective</h4>This study assesses longitudinal epidemiologic trends in the oldest head and neck cancer (HNC) patients, comparing the oropharynx to other mucosal HNC sites.<h4>Materials and methods</h4>Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, trends in incidence, two-year cancer specific mortality, and percent of cases recommended for and which received surgery from 2000 to 2018 in patients ages ≥85 years were assessed using Joinpoint analysis by HNC site. Trends were quantified as annual percentage change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).<h4>Results</h4>Among older adults, oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) incidence increased (APC = 1.80% [95% CI: 0.94-2.67]), while mortality decreased (APC = -2.01% [95% CI: -3.26--0.74]) from 2000 to 2018. At other mucosal HNC sites, incidence and mortality remained stable. Percentage of patients who received surgery significantly changed for oropharyngeal (APC = -15.34% from 2000 to 2005 [95% CI: -24.37 to -4.79]) and laryngeal (APC = -4.61% from 2000 to 2008 [95% CI -8.28 to -0.80]) cancers. Trends in recommendation for surgery varied by site with significant decreases at the larynx, oral cavity, and oropharynx.<h4>Conclusion</h4>OPC incidence is increasing among the oldest HNC patients. An increasing proportion of HPV-associated tumors could account for associated mortality improvement. There has been a shift towards non-surgical therapy possibly due to known favorable response of HPV-associated OPC to radiation therapy and/or poor surgical candidacy in this age group. The evolving treatment approach has not been detrimental to population-level survival outcomes, but optimal treatment has yet to be established. Future studies with pathologically confirmed HPV status are needed to better understand older adult OPC burden.
Authors
Chidambaram, S; Hong, SA; Simpson, MC; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Ward, GM; Massa, ST
MLA Citation
Chidambaram, Smrithi, et al. “Temporal trends in oropharyngeal cancer incidence, survival, and cancer-directed surgery among elderly Americans.Oral Oncology, vol. 134, 2022, p. 106132. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.oraloncology.2022.106132.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1516126
PMID
36191478
Source
epmc
Published In
Oral Oncology
Volume
134
Published Date
Start Page
106132
DOI
10.1016/j.oraloncology.2022.106132

Deconstructing olfactory epithelium developmental pathways in esthesioneuroblastoma

Authors
Finlay, JB; Hachem, RA; Jang, D; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Goldstein, BJ
MLA Citation
Finlay, John B., et al. “Deconstructing olfactory epithelium developmental pathways in esthesioneuroblastoma.” Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 21 Oct. 2022. Crossref, doi:10.1101/2022.10.18.512713.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1555344
Source
crossref
Published Date
DOI
10.1101/2022.10.18.512713