Nosayaba Osazuwa-Peters

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences

Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
School of Medicine

Assistant Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.D.S. 2008

University of Benin (Nigeria)

M.P.H. 2012

Washington University in St. Louis

Ph.D. 2018

Saint Louis University

Grants:

Depression, suicide and suicide mitigation implementation in head and neck cancer

Administered By
Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

When Should Patients Receive Mask Exemptions During the COVID-19 Pandemic? Ethics in Practice: Point-Counterpoint.

Authors
Brenner, MJ; Roy-Faderman, I; Roy, S; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Jackler, RK; Holt, GR
MLA Citation
Brenner, Michael J., et al. “When Should Patients Receive Mask Exemptions During the COVID-19 Pandemic? Ethics in Practice: Point-Counterpoint.Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, July 2021, p. 1945998211031447. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/01945998211031447.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487930
PMID
34228581
Source
pubmed
Published In
Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Published Date
Start Page
1945998211031447
DOI
10.1177/01945998211031447

Risk of suicide among individuals with a history of childhood cancer.

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have described suicidal ideation among survivors of childhood cancer, but small numbers of events limit the understanding of suicide risk. The objectives of this study were to assess whether childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk of suicide in comparison with the general population and to determine risk factors associated with risk in a population-based cohort. METHODS: First primary malignancies among individuals aged 0 to 19 years from 1975 to 2016 were identified from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) databases. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of suicide were obtained via SEER*Stat software from SEER 9. Fine and Gray proportional hazards models were used to identify suicide-associated factors among childhood cancer patients included in SEER 18. RESULTS: In all, 96,948 childhood cancer cases and 89 suicides were identified. Across all attained ages, the suicide risk for individuals with a childhood cancer history (11.64 per 100,000 person-years) was similar to the risk for those without a cancer history (SMR, 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.43). However, for survivors alive beyond the age of 28 years (the median age of death by suicide), the suicide risk was significantly elevated (suicides per 100,000 person-years, 22.43; SMR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02-1.87). Females (hazard ratio, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.18-0.59; P < .01) had lower risks than males. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that long-term childhood cancer survivors may be at increased suicide risk. Male sex is an independent risk factor for suicide. However, the absolute risk of suicide in older survivors is still low at ~1 per 5000 person-years. Future efforts should identify survivorship strategies to mitigate suicide risk.
Authors
Barnes, JM; Johnson, KJ; Grove, JL; Srivastava, AJ; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Perkins, SM
MLA Citation
Barnes, Justin M., et al. “Risk of suicide among individuals with a history of childhood cancer.Cancer, Oct. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33957.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499232
PMID
34693522
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33957

Differences in Sociodemographic Correlates of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancer Survival in the United States.

OBJECTIVES: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers account for about 9% of the cancer mortality burden in the United States; however, survival differs among sociodemographic factors. We determine sociodemographic and clinical variables associated with HPV-associated cancer survival. METHODS: Data derived from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 18 cancer registry were analyzed for a cohort of adult patients diagnosed with a first primary HPV-associated cancer (anal, cervical, oropharyngeal, penile, vaginal, and vulvar cancers), between 2007 and 2015. Multivariable Fine and Gray proportional hazards regression models stratified by anatomic site estimated the association of sociodemographic and clinical variables and cancer-specific survival. RESULTS: A total of 77 774 adults were included (11 216 anal, 27 098 cervical, 30 451 oropharyngeal, 2221 penile, 1176 vaginal, 5612 vulvar; average age = 57.2 years). The most common HPV-associated cancer was cervical carcinoma (58%) for females and oropharyngeal (81%) for male. Among patients diagnosed with anal/rectal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), males had a higher risk of death than females. NonHispanic (NH) blacks had a higher risk of death from anal/rectal SCC, oropharyngeal SCC, and cervical carcinoma; and Hispanics had a higher risk of death from oropharyngeal SCC than NH whites. Marital status was associated with risk of death for all anatomic sites except vulvar. Compared to nonMedicaid insurance, patients with Medicaid and uninsured had higher risk of death from anal/rectal SCC, oropharyngeal SCC, and cervical carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: There exists gender (anal) and racial and insurance (anal, cervical, and oropharyngeal) disparities in relative survival. Concerted efforts are needed to increase and sustain progress made in HPV vaccine uptake among these specific patient subgroups, to reduce cancer incidence.
Authors
Osazuwa-Peters, N; Simpson, MC; Rohde, RL; Challapalli, SD; Massa, ST; Adjei Boakye, E
MLA Citation
Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba, et al. “Differences in Sociodemographic Correlates of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancer Survival in the United States.Cancer Control, vol. 28, Jan. 2021, p. 10732748211041894. Pubmed, doi:10.1177/10732748211041894.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499861
PMID
34696619
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Control
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
10732748211041894
DOI
10.1177/10732748211041894

Lethal Suicidal Acts Among Head and Neck Cancer Survivors: The Tip of a Distress Iceberg.

Authors
MLA Citation
Massa, Sean T., et al. “Lethal Suicidal Acts Among Head and Neck Cancer Survivors: The Tip of a Distress Iceberg.Jama Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg, Oct. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2021.2840.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498835
PMID
34617973
Source
pubmed
Published In
Jama Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
Published Date
DOI
10.1001/jamaoto.2021.2840

Human Papillomavirus-Associated Sexual Risks Among High School Students in the U.S.: Does Sexual Orientation Play a Role?

We examined the association between sexual orientation and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related risky sexual behaviors among high school students in the U.S. We used the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a three-stage cluster sample, nationally representative, cross-sectional study. Participants were sexually active students (Grades 9-12) in public, private, and Catholic schools in 50 states and the District of Columbia (n = 5,958). Sexual orientation dimensions were: sexual self-identity (heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and not sure) and sex of sexual contacts. HPV-associated risky sexual risk behaviors selected a priori were early sexual debut (≤ 12 or  ≥ 13 years old) and number of lifetime partners (≥ 2 or  ≥ 4). Separate multiple logistic regression analyses estimated association between sexual orientation and sex of sexual contacts, and HPV-associated risky sexual behaviors. Among the 5,958 high school students, a quarter had ≥ 4, and two-thirds had ≥ 2 sexual partners. Students who self-identified as bisexual (aOR = 2.43, 99% CI 1.19-4.98) or "not sure" (aOR = 4.56, 99% CI 2.54-8.17) were more likely to have sexual debut before 13 years. Similarly, students whose sexual contacts were adolescent females who had sex with females and males were more likely to have sexual debut before they turned 13 years of age (aOR = 3.46, 99% CI 1.83-6.48), or had ≥ 4 sexual partners (aOR = 2.66, 99% CI 1.74-4.08), or had ≥ 2 sexual partners (aOR = 3.09, 99% CI 1.91-5.00). In conclusion, HPV-associated risky sexual behavior is prevalent among high school students, especially sexual minorities. Interventions tailored to this population could increase HPV vaccine uptake and prevent future HPV-associated cancers and other negative outcomes.
Authors
Pham, VT; Adjei Boakye, E; Simpson, MC; Van Phu Bui, Q; Olomukoro, SI; Zand, DH; Halloran, DR; Osazuwa-Peters, N
MLA Citation
Pham, Vy T., et al. “Human Papillomavirus-Associated Sexual Risks Among High School Students in the U.S.: Does Sexual Orientation Play a Role?Arch Sex Behav, vol. 50, no. 7, Oct. 2021, pp. 3093–101. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10508-021-02083-9.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498340
PMID
34590221
Source
pubmed
Published In
Archives of Sexual Behavior
Volume
50
Published Date
Start Page
3093
End Page
3101
DOI
10.1007/s10508-021-02083-9