Quinn Ostrom

Overview:

I am a cancer epidemiologist with specialized training in genetic epidemiology. The overall goal of my research program is to identify genetic factors that increase the risk of developing a brain tumor as well as those that affect prognosis after diagnosis. My research focuses on: 1) using population-level cancer registry data for surveillance and risk factor discovery; 2) discovering sources of germline genetic risk for brain tumors and 3) understanding the relationship between immune traits and brain tumor risk and survival. I approach these questions through a research program of interrelated projects and application of novel analytic techniques.

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.A. 2010

Case Western Reserve University

M.P.H. 2012

Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

Ph.D. 2018

Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

Post Doctoral Associate

Baylor College of Medicine

Grants:

Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) Statistical Analysis

Administered By
Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
Awarded By
Central Brain Tumor Registry
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The state of neuro-oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic: a worldwide assessment.

Background: It remains unknown how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed neuro-oncology clinical practice, training, and research efforts. Methods: We performed an international survey of practitioners, scientists, and trainees from 21 neuro-oncology organizations across 6 continents, April 24-May 17, 2020. We assessed clinical practice and research environments, institutional preparedness and support, and perceived impact on patients. Results: Of 582 respondents, 258 (45%) were US-based and 314 (55%) international. Ninety-four percent of participants reported changes in their clinical practice. Ninety-five percent of respondents converted at least some practice to telemedicine. Ten percent of practitioners felt the need to see patients in person, specifically because of billing concerns and pressure from their institutions. Sixty-seven percent of practitioners suspended enrollment for at least one clinical trial, including 62% suspending phase III trial enrollments. More than 50% believed neuro-oncology patients were at increased risk for COVID-19. Seventy-one percent of clinicians feared for their own personal safety or that of their families, specifically because of their clinical duties; 20% had inadequate personal protective equipment. While 69% reported increased stress, 44% received no psychosocial support from their institutions. Thirty-seven percent had salary reductions and 63% of researchers temporarily closed their laboratories. However, the pandemic created positive changes in perceived patient satisfaction, communication quality, and technology use to deliver care and mediate interactions with other practitioners. Conclusions: The pandemic has changed treatment schedules and limited investigational treatment options. Institutional lack of support created clinician and researcher anxiety. Communication with patients was satisfactory. We make recommendations to guide clinical and scientific infrastructure moving forward and address the personal challenges of providers and researchers.
Authors
Mrugala, MM; Ostrom, QT; Pressley, SM; Taylor, JW; Thomas, AA; Wefel, JS; Coven, SL; Acquaye, AA; Haynes, C; Agnihotri, S; Lim, M; Peters, KB; Sulman, EP; Salcido, JT; Butowski, NA; Hervey-Jumper, S; Mansouri, A; Oliver, KR; Porter, AB; Nassiri, F; Schiff, D; Dunbar, EM; Hegi, ME; Armstrong, TS; van den Bent, MJ; Chang, SM; Zadeh, G; Chheda, MG
MLA Citation
Mrugala, Maciej M., et al. “The state of neuro-oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic: a worldwide assessment.Neurooncol Adv, vol. 3, no. 1, Jan. 2021, p. vdab035. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/noajnl/vdab035.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483189
PMID
34007966
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Advances
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
vdab035
DOI
10.1093/noajnl/vdab035

Glioblastoma as an age-related neurological disorder in adults.

Background: Advanced age is a major risk factor for the development of many diseases including those affecting the central nervous system. Wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase glioblastoma (IDHwt GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain cancer and accounts for ≥90% of all adult GBM diagnoses. Patients with IDHwt GBM have a median age of diagnosis at 68-70 years of age, and increasing age is associated with an increasingly worse prognosis for patients with this type of GBM. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results, The Cancer Genome Atlas, and the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas databases were analyzed for mortality indices. Meta-analysis of 80 clinical trials was evaluated for log hazard ratio for aging to tumor survivorship. Results: Despite significant advances in the understanding of intratumoral genetic alterations, molecular characteristics of tumor microenvironments, and relationships between tumor molecular characteristics and the use of targeted therapeutics, life expectancy for older adults with GBM has yet to improve. Conclusions: Based upon the results of our analysis, we propose that age-dependent factors that are yet to be fully elucidated, contribute to IDHwt GBM patient outcomes.
Authors
Kim, M; Ladomersky, E; Mozny, A; Kocherginsky, M; O'Shea, K; Reinstein, ZZ; Zhai, L; Bell, A; Lauing, KL; Bollu, L; Rabin, E; Dixit, K; Kumthekar, P; Platanias, LC; Hou, L; Zheng, Y; Wu, J; Zhang, B; Hrachova, M; Merrill, SA; Mrugala, MM; Prabhu, VC; Horbinski, C; James, CD; Yamini, B; Ostrom, QT; Johnson, MO; Reardon, DA; Lukas, RV; Wainwright, DA
MLA Citation
Kim, Miri, et al. “Glioblastoma as an age-related neurological disorder in adults.Neurooncol Adv, vol. 3, no. 1, Jan. 2021, p. vdab125. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/noajnl/vdab125.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1499584
PMID
34647022
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncology Advances
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
vdab125
DOI
10.1093/noajnl/vdab125

Sex-Specific Genetic Associations for Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) and its premalignant lesion, Barrett's esophagus (BE), are characterized by a strong and yet unexplained male predominance (with a male-to-female ratio in EA incidence of up to 6:1). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 20 susceptibility loci for these conditions. However, potential sex differences in genetic associations with BE/EA remain largely unexplored. METHODS: Given strong genetic overlap, BE and EA cases were combined into a single case group for analysis. These were compared with population-based controls. We performed sex-specific GWAS of BE/EA in 3 separate studies and then used fixed-effects meta-analysis to provide summary estimates for >9 million variants for male and female individuals. A series of downstream analyses were conducted separately in male and female individuals to identify genes associated with BE/EA and the genetic correlations between BE/EA and other traits. RESULTS: We included 6758 male BE/EA cases, 7489 male controls, 1670 female BE/EA cases, and 6174 female controls. After Bonferroni correction, our meta-analysis of sex-specific GWAS identified 1 variant at chromosome 6q11.1 (rs112894788, KHDRBS2-MTRNR2L9, PBONF = .039) that was statistically significantly associated with BE/EA risk in male individuals only, and 1 variant at chromosome 8p23.1 (rs13259457, PRSS55-RP1L1, PBONF = 0.057) associated, at borderline significance, with BE/EA risk in female individuals only. We also observed strong genetic correlations of BE/EA with gastroesophageal reflux disease in male individuals and obesity in female individuals. CONCLUSIONS: The identified novel sex-specific variants associated with BE/EA could improve the understanding of the genetic architecture of the disease and the reasons for the male predominance.
Authors
Dong, J; Maj, C; Tsavachidis, S; Ostrom, QT; Gharahkhani, P; Anderson, LA; Wu, AH; Ye, W; Bernstein, L; Borisov, O; Schröder, J; Chow, W-H; Gammon, MD; Liu, G; Caldas, C; Pharoah, PD; Risch, HA; May, A; Gerges, C; Anders, M; Venerito, M; Schmidt, T; Izbicki, JR; Hölscher, AH; Schumacher, B; Vashist, Y; Neuhaus, H; Rösch, T; Knapp, M; Krawitz, P; Böhmer, A; Iyer, PG; Reid, BJ; Lagergren, J; Shaheen, NJ; Corley, DA; Gockel, I; Fitzgerald, RC; Stomach and Oesophageal Cancer Study (SOCS) consortium,; Cook, MB; Whiteman, DC; Vaughan, TL; Schumacher, J; Thrift, AP
MLA Citation
Dong, Jing, et al. “Sex-Specific Genetic Associations for Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.Gastroenterology, vol. 159, no. 6, Dec. 2020, pp. 2065-2076.e1. Pubmed, doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2020.08.052.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1485882
PMID
32918910
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gastroenterology
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
2065
End Page
2076.e1
DOI
10.1053/j.gastro.2020.08.052

Abstract 129: Integrated genomic analysis of survival outliers in glioblastoma

Authors
Peng, S; Dhurv, H; Armstrong, B; Kiefer, J; Salhia, B; Ross, J; Legendre, C; Virk, S; Sloan, AE; Ostrom, QT; Barnholtz-Sloan, J; Tran, NL; Berens, ME
MLA Citation
Peng, Sen, et al. “Abstract 129: Integrated genomic analysis of survival outliers in glioblastoma.” Molecular and Cellular Biology, Genetics, American Association for Cancer Research, 2016. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.am2016-129.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498897
Source
crossref
Published In
Molecular and Cellular Biology, Genetics
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.am2016-129

Biospecimen Repositories in the Precision Medicine Era: Perspectives from a Biobanker in the "Trenches.”

Authors
Ostrom, Q; Barnholtz-Sloan, J
MLA Citation
Ostrom, Quinn, and Jill Barnholtz-Sloan. “Biospecimen Repositories in the Precision Medicine Era: Perspectives from a Biobanker in the "Trenches.”.” Specimen Science Ethics and Policy Implications, MIT Press, 2017.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501507
Source
manual
Published Date

Research Areas:

Brain--Tumors
Cancer Disparities
Cancer--Epidemiology
Genetic epidemiology
Genome-Wide Association Study
Glioma
Health Disparities
Molecular Epidemiology
Registries
SEER Program