Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Detection of Novel Alternative Splicing Biomarkers of Hypoxia in Breast and Lung Tumors

Administered By
Radiation Oncology
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Non-CME Educational Oncological Immersion Experience

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an understudied and aggressive form of breast cancer with a poor prognosis, accounting for 2-6% of new breast cancer diagnoses but 10% of all breast cancer-related deaths in the United States. Currently there are no therapeutic regimens developed specifically for IBC, and it is critical to recognize that all aspects of treating IBC - including staging, diagnosis, and therapy - are vastly different than other breast cancers. In December 2014, under the umbrella of an interdisciplinary initiative supported by the Duke School of Medicine, researchers, clinicians, research administrators, and patient advocates formed the Duke Consortium for IBC to address the needs of patients in North Carolina (an ethnically and economically diverse state with 100 counties) and across the Southeastern United States. The primary goal of this group is to translate research into action and improve both awareness and patient care through collaborations with local, national and international IBC programs. The consortium held its inaugural meeting on Feb 28, 2018, which also marked Rare Disease Day and convened national research experts, clinicians, patients, advocates, government representatives, foundation leaders, staff, and trainees. The meeting focused on new developments and challenges in the clinical management of IBC, research challenges and opportunities, and an interactive session to garner input from patients, advocates, and community partners that would inform a strategic plan toward continuing improvements in IBC patient care, research, and education.
Authors
Devi, GR; Hough, H; Barrett, N; Cristofanilli, M; Overmoyer, B; Spector, N; Ueno, NT; Woodward, W; Kirkpatrick, J; Vincent, B; Williams, KP; Finley, C; Duff, B; Worthy, V; McCall, S; Hollister, BA; Palmer, G; Force, J; Westbrook, K; Fayanju, O; Suneja, G; Dent, SF; Hwang, ES; Patierno, SR; Marcom, PK
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium..” J Cancer, vol. 10, no. 15, 2019, pp. 3344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.7150/jca.31176.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395729
PMID
31293637
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
3344
End Page
3351
DOI
10.7150/jca.31176

Establishment of African American prostate cancer patient-derived primary cell lines and xenografts.

Authors
Patierno, B; Glover, W; Ribar, T; Kittles, R; Foo, W-C; McCall, S; Huang, J; George, D; Freedman, J; Patierno, S; Wood, K; Hsu, D
MLA Citation
Patierno, Brendon, et al. “Establishment of African American prostate cancer patient-derived primary cell lines and xenografts..” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 27, no. 7, AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2018, pp. 96–96.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1333231
Source
wos
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
96
End Page
96

Barriers to health care contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: Data from the Patient Navigation Research Program.

BACKGROUND: There is limited understanding of the association between barriers to care and clinical outcomes within patient navigation programs. METHODS: Secondary analyses of data from the intervention arms of the Patient Navigation Research Program were performed, which included navigated participants with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening tests from 2007 to 2010. Independent variables were: 1) the number of unique barriers to care (0, 1, 2, or ≥3) documented during patient navigation encounters; and 2) the presence of socio-legal barriers originating from social policy (yes/no). The median time to diagnostic resolution of index screening abnormalities was estimated using Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence curves. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression examined the impact of barriers on time to resolution, controlling for sociodemographics and stratifying by study center. RESULTS: Among 2600 breast screening participants, approximately 75% had barriers to care documented (25% had 1 barrier, 16% had 2 barriers, and 34% had ≥3 barriers). Among 1387 cervical screening participants, greater than one-half had barriers documented (31% had 1 barrier, 11% had 2 barriers, and 13% had ≥3 barriers). Among breast screening participants, the presence of barriers was associated with less timely resolution for any number of barriers compared with no barriers. Among cervical screening participants, only the presence of ≥2 barriers was found to be associated with less timely resolution. Both types of barriers, socio-legal and other barriers, were found to be associated with delay among breast and cervical screening participants. CONCLUSIONS: Navigated women with barriers resolved cancer screening abnormalities at a slower rate compared with navigated women with no barriers. Further innovations in navigation care are necessary to maximize the impact of patient navigation programs nationwide.
Authors
Ramachandran, A; Snyder, FR; Katz, ML; Darnell, JS; Dudley, DJ; Patierno, SR; Sanders, MR; Valverde, PA; Simon, MA; Warren-Mears, V; Battaglia, TA; Patient Navigation Research Program Investigators,
MLA Citation
Ramachandran, Ambili, et al. “Barriers to health care contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: Data from the Patient Navigation Research Program..” Cancer, vol. 121, no. 22, Nov. 2015, pp. 4016–24. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.29607.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1104186
PMID
26385420
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
121
Published Date
Start Page
4016
End Page
4024
DOI
10.1002/cncr.29607

Psychometric validation and reliability analysis of a Spanish version of the patient satisfaction with cancer-related care measure: a patient navigation research program study.

BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction (PS), a key measure of quality of cancer care, is a core study outcome of the multi-site National Cancer Institute-funded Patient Navigation Research Program. Despite large numbers of underserved monolingual Spanish speakers (MSS) residing in USA, there is no validated Spanish measure of PS that spans the whole spectrum of cancer-related care. The present study reports on the validation of the Patient Satisfaction with Cancer Care (PSCC) measure for Spanish (PSCC-Sp) speakers receiving diagnostic and therapeutic cancer-related care. METHODS: Original PSCC items were professionally translated and back translated to ensure cultural appropriateness, meaningfulness, and equivalence. Then, the resulting 18-item PSCC-Sp measure was administered to 285 MSS. We evaluated latent structure and internal consistency of the PSCC-Sp using principal components analysis (PCA) and Cronbach coefficient alpha (α). We used correlation analyses to demonstrate divergence and convergence of the PSCC-Sp with a Spanish version of the Patient Satisfaction with Interpersonal Relationship with Navigator (PSN-I-Sp) measure and patients' demographics. RESULTS: The PCA revealed a coherent set of items that explicates 47% of the variance in PS. Reliability assessment demonstrated that the PSCC-Sp had high internal consistency (α = 0.92). The PSCC-Sp demonstrated good face validity and convergent and divergent validities as indicated by moderate correlations with the PSN-I-Sp (p = 0.003) and nonsignificant correlations with marital status and household income (all p(s) > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The PSCC-Sp is a valid and reliable measure of PS and should be tested in other MSS populations.
Authors
Jean-Pierre, P; Fiscella, K; Winters, PC; Paskett, E; Wells, K; Battaglia, T; Patient Navigation Research Program Group,
MLA Citation
Jean-Pierre, Pascal, et al. “Psychometric validation and reliability analysis of a Spanish version of the patient satisfaction with cancer-related care measure: a patient navigation research program study..” Support Care Cancer, vol. 20, no. 9, Sept. 2012, pp. 1949–56. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-011-1297-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1113758
PMID
22038482
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Volume
20
Published Date
Start Page
1949
End Page
1956
DOI
10.1007/s00520-011-1297-3

Prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men screened for prostate cancer.

OBJECTIVES: The Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) is a widely used scale for the screening and diagnosis of erectile dysfunction (ED). Our objective was to incorporate the SHIM into our prostate cancer screening program to estimate the prevalence of ED among men screened for prostate cancer. METHODS: During September 2006, men younger than 75 years of age living in the Washington, DC area were invited to participate in the George Washington University Prostate Cancer Screening Program. The SHIM questionnaire was administered to all participants. Information regarding primary care physician use, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor use, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, and digital rectal examination findings was also obtained. Those who registered SHIM scores of 17 or less or who were taking a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor were considered to have ED. RESULTS: Overall, 333 men attended the program. Of the 328 men, 123 (37.5%) met our definition of ED; 30 (9%) were using a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor and 93 (28%) had an SHIM score of 17 or less. Univariate analysis suggested a significant difference in the prevalence of ED between African-American men and non-African-American men, with 25% and 41%, respectively, found to have a SHIM score of 17 or less (P < .01); however, this difference was not significant once we controlled for age (P > .05). Among our participants, 33% lacked a primary care physician. Of these, 22% had a SHIM score of 17 or less. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study have shown that ED increases in a nonlinear fashion with age, consistent with the findings of previous reports. Of greater concern, however, given the strong association between ED and cardiovascular disease, was the number of those with ED who lacked a primary care physician.
Authors
Bianco, FJ; McHone, BR; Wagner, K; King, A; Burgess, J; Patierno, S; Jarrett, TW
MLA Citation
Bianco, Fernando J., et al. “Prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men screened for prostate cancer..” Urology, vol. 74, no. 1, July 2009, pp. 89–93. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.urology.2008.03.036.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1113762
PMID
19428072
Source
pubmed
Published In
Urology
Volume
74
Published Date
Start Page
89
End Page
93
DOI
10.1016/j.urology.2008.03.036