Steven Patierno

Overview:

Patierno's current translational research interests are focused on the genomics molecular biology of cancer disparities, cancer biology, molecular pharmacology and targeted experimental therapeutics to control prostate, breast and lung tumor aggressiveness. He is an internationally recognized expert in cancer control, cancer causation and molecular carcinogenesis, which includes a broad spectrum of laboratory and population level research.   Patierno is also actively engaged in cancer health disparities and healthcare delivery research focused on patient navigation, survivorship, community-based interventions, mHealth, implementation sciences, cancer care economics, and policy.

Positions:

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1981

University of Connecticut

Ph.D. 1985

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Postdoctoral Training, Norris Comprehensive Cancer

University of Southern California

Grants:

3D Biology Signatures defined by Nanostring Max System

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Major User
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Genetic Determinates for Disparities in African American Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

Targeting RNA splicing in race-related aggressive and lethal prostate cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PC150506: Small molecule targeting of RNA splice variants driving tumor aggressiveness

Administered By
Chemistry
Role
Collaborator
Start Date
End Date

2/2 NCCU-DUKE Cancer Disparities Translational Research Partnership

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training.

Authors
Valverde, PA; Burhansstipanov, L; Patierno, S; Gentry, S; Dwyer, A; Wysocki, KL; Patterson, AK; Krebs, LU; Sellers, J; Johnston, D
MLA Citation
Valverde, Patricia A., et al. “Findings from the National Navigation Roundtable: A call for competency-based patient navigation training..” Cancer, vol. 125, no. 24, Dec. 2019, pp. 4350–59. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.32470.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1409904
PMID
31503340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
125
Published Date
Start Page
4350
End Page
4359
DOI
10.1002/cncr.32470

Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an understudied and aggressive form of breast cancer with a poor prognosis, accounting for 2-6% of new breast cancer diagnoses but 10% of all breast cancer-related deaths in the United States. Currently there are no therapeutic regimens developed specifically for IBC, and it is critical to recognize that all aspects of treating IBC - including staging, diagnosis, and therapy - are vastly different than other breast cancers. In December 2014, under the umbrella of an interdisciplinary initiative supported by the Duke School of Medicine, researchers, clinicians, research administrators, and patient advocates formed the Duke Consortium for IBC to address the needs of patients in North Carolina (an ethnically and economically diverse state with 100 counties) and across the Southeastern United States. The primary goal of this group is to translate research into action and improve both awareness and patient care through collaborations with local, national and international IBC programs. The consortium held its inaugural meeting on Feb 28, 2018, which also marked Rare Disease Day and convened national research experts, clinicians, patients, advocates, government representatives, foundation leaders, staff, and trainees. The meeting focused on new developments and challenges in the clinical management of IBC, research challenges and opportunities, and an interactive session to garner input from patients, advocates, and community partners that would inform a strategic plan toward continuing improvements in IBC patient care, research, and education.
Authors
Devi, GR; Hough, H; Barrett, N; Cristofanilli, M; Overmoyer, B; Spector, N; Ueno, NT; Woodward, W; Kirkpatrick, J; Vincent, B; Williams, KP; Finley, C; Duff, B; Worthy, V; McCall, S; Hollister, BA; Palmer, G; Force, J; Westbrook, K; Fayanju, O; Suneja, G; Dent, SF; Hwang, ES; Patierno, SR; Marcom, PK
MLA Citation
Devi, Gayathri R., et al. “Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) Research, Clinical Management and Community Engagement from the Duke IBC Consortium..” J Cancer, vol. 10, no. 15, 2019, pp. 3344–51. Pubmed, doi:10.7150/jca.31176.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1395729
PMID
31293637
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Cancer
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
3344
End Page
3351
DOI
10.7150/jca.31176

Alternative RNA Splicing as a Potential Major Source of Untapped Molecular Targets in Precision Oncology and Cancer Disparities.

Studies of alternative RNA splicing (ARS) have the potential to provide an abundance of novel targets for development of new biomarkers and therapeutics in oncology, which will be necessary to improve outcomes for patients with cancer and mitigate cancer disparities. ARS, a key step in gene expression enabling individual genes to encode multiple proteins, is emerging as a major driver of abnormal phenotypic heterogeneity. Recent studies have begun to identify RNA splicing-related genetic and genomic variation in tumors, oncogenes dysregulated by ARS, RNA splice variants driving race-related cancer aggressiveness and drug response, spliceosome-dependent transformation, and RNA splicing-related immunogenic epitopes in cancer. In addition, recent studies have begun to identify and test, preclinically and clinically, approaches to modulate and exploit ARS for therapeutic application, including splice-switching oligonucleotides, small molecules targeting RNA splicing or RNA splice variants, and combination regimens with immunotherapies. Although ARS data hold such promise for precision oncology, inclusion of studies of ARS in translational and clinical cancer research remains limited. Technologic developments in sequencing and bioinformatics are being routinely incorporated into clinical oncology that permit investigation of clinically relevant ARS events, yet ARS remains largely overlooked either because of a lack of awareness within the clinical oncology community or perceived barriers to the technical complexity of analyzing ARS. This perspective aims to increase such awareness, propose immediate opportunities to improve identification and analysis of ARS, and call for bioinformaticians and cancer researchers to work together to address the urgent need to incorporate ARS into cancer biology and precision oncology.
Authors
Robinson, TJ; Freedman, JA; Al Abo, M; Deveaux, AE; LaCroix, B; Patierno, BM; George, DJ; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Robinson, Timothy J., et al. “Alternative RNA Splicing as a Potential Major Source of Untapped Molecular Targets in Precision Oncology and Cancer Disparities..” Clin Cancer Res, vol. 25, no. 10, May 2019, pp. 2963–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-2445.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1370310
PMID
30755441
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
2963
End Page
2968
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-2445

Abstract B58: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of race-related alternatively spliced genes associate with prostate cancer risk, aggressiveness and/or survival

Authors
MLA Citation
Freedman, Jennifer, et al. “Abstract B58: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of race-related alternatively spliced genes associate with prostate cancer risk, aggressiveness and/or survival.” Epidemiology, Lifestyle, and Genetics, American Association for Cancer Research, 2017. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp16-b58.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1346458
Source
crossref
Published In
Epidemiology, Lifestyle, and Genetics
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp16-b58

Costs and outcomes evaluation of patient navigation after abnormal cancer screening: evidence from the Patient Navigation Research Program.

BACKGROUND: Navigators can facilitate timely access to cancer services, but to the authors' knowledge there are little data available regarding their economic impact. METHODS: The authors conducted a cost-consequence analysis of navigation versus usual care among 10,521 individuals with abnormal breast, cervical, colorectal, or prostate cancer screening results who enrolled in the Patient Navigation Research Program study from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010. Navigation costs included diagnostic evaluation, patient and staff time, materials, and overhead. Consequences or outcomes were time to diagnostic resolution and probability of resolution. Differences in costs and outcomes were evaluated using multilevel, mixed-effects regression modeling adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, language, marital status, insurance status, cancer, and site clustering. RESULTS: The majority of individuals were members of a minority (70.7%) and uninsured or publically insured (72.7%). Diagnostic resolution was higher for navigation versus usual care at 180 days (56.2% vs 53.8%; P = .008) and 270 days (70.0% vs 68.2%; P < .001). Although there were no differences in the average number of days to resolution between the 2 groups (110 days vs 109 days; P = .63), the probability of ever having diagnostic resolution was higher for the navigation group versus the usual-care group (84.5% vs 79.6%; P < .001). The added cost of navigation versus usual care was $275 per patient (95% confidence interval, $260-$290; P < .001). There was no significant difference in stage distribution among the 12.4% of patients in the navigation group vs 11% of the usual-care patients diagnosed with cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Navigation adds costs and modestly increases the probability of diagnostic resolution among patients with abnormal screening test results. Navigation is only likely to be cost-effective if improved resolution translates into an earlier cancer stage at the time of diagnosis.
Authors
Bensink, ME; Ramsey, SD; Battaglia, T; Fiscella, K; Hurd, TC; McKoy, JM; Patierno, SR; Raich, PC; Seiber, EE; Warren-Mears, V; Whitley, E; Paskett, ED; Mandelblatt, S; Patient Navigation Research Program,
MLA Citation
Bensink, Mark E., et al. “Costs and outcomes evaluation of patient navigation after abnormal cancer screening: evidence from the Patient Navigation Research Program..” Cancer, vol. 120, no. 4, Feb. 2014, pp. 570–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.28438.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1020509
PMID
24166217
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
120
Published Date
Start Page
570
End Page
578
DOI
10.1002/cncr.28438