Katherine Peters

Overview:

Dr. Katy Peters, MD PhD FAAN is an associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center (PRTBTC) at Duke.   Her academic medical career started at Stanford University School of Medicine where she received an MD and PhD in Cancer Biology.  After completing a neurology residency at Johns Hopkins University and a fellowship in cognitive neurosciences, Katy joined the PRTBTC as a neuro-oncology fellow.  In 2009, she became a faculty member at PRTBTC.  With an amazing team of nursing and advanced practice providers, she actively sees and cares for patients with primary brain tumors.  Her research interests include supportive care for brain cancer patients, cognitive dysfunction in cancer patients, and physical function and activity of brain cancer patients.   While she runs clinical trials for the treatment of primary brain tumors, her key interest is on clinical trials that focus on the improvement of quality of life and cognition for brain tumor patients.   In 2019, the PRTBTC designated her as the Director of Supportive Care, thus furthering the PRTBTC and her committee to bettering the quality of life for brain tumor patients.   She is very active in teaching medical school students, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers and is the Program Director of the PRTBRC neuro-oncology fellowship.     She is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties for neuro-oncology.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Neurology

Neurology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2003

Stanford University

Ph.D. 2003

Stanford University

Intern, Medicine

Johns Hopkins University

Resident and Fellow in Neurology, Neurology

Johns Hopkins University

Fellow in Neuro-Oncology, Surgery

Duke University

Grants:

Ph 1/2 Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma Treated with Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and BMX-001

Administered By
Neurosurgery, Neuro-Oncology
Awarded By
BioMimetix JV LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled, Open-label, Perioperative Study of AG-120 and AG-881 in Subjects with Recurrent, Non-enhancing, IDH1 Mutant, Low-grade Glioma. (AG120-881-C-001)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Functional Capacity and Physical Function in Glioblastoma Patients Treated with or without Tumor-Treating Fields

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Novocure
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Study for Management of Ocular Side Effects in Subjects with EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma receiving Depatuxizumab Mafodotin

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AbbVie Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized phase 2 single blind study of temozolomide plus radiation therapy combined with nivolumab or placebo in newly diagnosed adult subjects with MGMT-methylated glioblastoma (BMS CA209-548)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Palliative Care Use for Critically Ill Patients With Brain Metastases.

CONTEXT: Critically ill patients with brain metastases (BM) face significant uncertainty regarding prognosis and survival and can benefit from Palliative care (PC). However, research regarding the role of PC in this population is lacking. OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare BM patients admitted to an intensive care unit who received an inpatient PC consult (PC cohort) to those who did not (Usual Care, UC cohort). METHODS: We performed a single-institution retrospective cohort analysis. Our outcome variables were mortality, time from intensive care unit admission to death, disposition, and change in code status. We also evaluated PC's role in complex medical decision making, symptom management and hospice education. RESULTS: PC consult was placed in 31 of 118 (28%) of patients. The overall mortality rates were not statistically different (78.8% vs. 90.3%, P= 0.15, UC vs. PC cohort). Patients in the PC cohort had a shorter time to death, higher rate of death within 30 days of admission, increased rate of discharge to hospice, and increase percentage of code status change to "do not attempt resuscitation" during the admission. The primary services provided by PC were symptom management (n = 21, 67.7%) and assistance in complex medical decision making (n = 20, 64.5%). CONCLUSION: In our patient cohort, PC is an underutilized service that can assist in complex medical decision making and symptom management of critically ill BM patients. Further prospective studies surveying patient, family and provider experiences could better inform the qualitative impact of PC in this unique patient population.
Authors
Kang, JH; Price, M; Dalton, T; Ramirez, L; Fecci, PE; Kamal, AH; Johnson, MO; Peters, KB; Goodwin, CR
MLA Citation
Kang, Jennifer H., et al. “Palliative Care Use for Critically Ill Patients With Brain Metastases.J Pain Symptom Manage, vol. 62, no. 5, Nov. 2021, pp. 927–35. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.05.003.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1483303
PMID
33992757
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Pain Symptom Manage
Volume
62
Published Date
Start Page
927
End Page
935
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2021.05.003

Caregiver burden by treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with glioblastoma.

BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. For caregivers of people with glioblastoma, the burden of care can be high. Patients often present with different clinical characteristics, which may impact caregiver burden in different ways. This study aimed to evaluate associations between patient clinical characteristics and caregiver burden/quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Caregiver-patient dyads were enrolled at 7 academic cancer centers in the United States. Eligible caregiver participants were self-reported as the primary caregiver of an adult living with glioblastoma and completed a caregiver burden survey. Eligible patients were age ≥ 18 years at glioblastoma diagnosis and alive when their respective caregiver entered the study, with the presence of cognitive dysfunction confirmed by the caregiver. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: The final cohort included 167 dyads. Poor patient performance status resulted in patient difficulty with mental tasks, more caregiving tasks, and increased caregiving time. Language problems were reported in patients with left-sided lesions. Patient confusion was negatively associated with all caregiver domains: emotional health, social health, general health, ability to work, confidence in finances, and overall QoL. Better caregiver QoL was observed in patients with frontal lobe lesions versus non-frontal lobe lesions. CONCLUSION: This study reinforced that patient performance status is a critical clinical factor that significantly affects caregiver burden, caregiving tasks, and caregiver time. Additionally, patient confusion affects multiple facets of caregiver burden/QoL. These results could be used to support guided intervention for caregiver support, customized to the patient experience.
Authors
Au, TH; Willis, C; Reblin, M; Peters, KB; Nghiemphu, PL; Taylor, JW; Colman, H; Cohen, AL; Ormond, DR; Chakravarti, A; Willmarth, N; Menon, J; Ma, J; Bauer, H; Watanabe, AH; Ulrich, CM; Singh, P; Marshall, A; Korytowsky, B; Stenehjem, D; Brixner, D
MLA Citation
Au, Trang H., et al. “Caregiver burden by treatment and clinical characteristics of patients with glioblastoma.Support Care Cancer, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00520-021-06514-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497138
PMID
34510238
Source
pubmed
Published In
Support Care Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s00520-021-06514-0

Primary brain tumor patients admitted to a US intensive care unit: a descriptive analysis.

Purpose: To describe our population of primary brain tumor (PBT) patients, a subgroup of cancer patients whose intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes are understudied. Methods: Retrospective analysis of PBT patients admitted to an ICU between 2013 to 2018 for an unplanned need. Using descriptive analyses, we characterized our population and their outcomes. Results: Fifty-nine PBT patients were analyzed. ICU mortality was 19% (11/59). The most common indication for admission was seizures (n = 16, 27%). Conclusion: Our ICU mortality of PBT patients was comparable to other solid tumor patients and the general ICU population and better than patients with hematological malignancies. Further study of a larger population would inform guidelines for triaging PBT patients who would most benefit from ICU-level care.
Authors
Kang, JH; Swisher, CB; Buckley, ED; Herndon, JE; Lipp, ES; Kirkpatrick, JP; Desjardins, A; Friedman, HS; Johnson, MO; Randazzo, DM; Ashley, DM; Peters, KB
MLA Citation
Kang, Jennifer H., et al. “Primary brain tumor patients admitted to a US intensive care unit: a descriptive analysis.Cns Oncol, vol. 10, no. 3, Sept. 2021, p. CNS77. Pubmed, doi:10.2217/cns-2021-0009.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497219
PMID
34545753
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cns Oncology
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
CNS77
DOI
10.2217/cns-2021-0009

Vorasidenib, a Dual Inhibitor of Mutant IDH1/2, in Recurrent or Progressive Glioma; Results of a First-in-Human Phase I Trial.

PURPOSE: Lower grade gliomas (LGGs) are malignant brain tumors. Current therapy is associated with short- and long-term toxicity. Progression to higher tumor grade is associated with contrast enhancement on MRI. The majority of LGGs harbor mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2). Vorasidenib (AG-881) is a first-in-class, brain-penetrant, dual inhibitor of the mutant IDH1 and mutant IDH2 enzymes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, open-label, phase I, dose-escalation study of vorasidenib in 93 patients with mutant IDH1/2 (mIDH1/2) solid tumors, including 52 patients with glioma that had recurred or progressed following standard therapy. Vorasidenib was administered orally, once daily, in 28-day cycles until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Enrollment is complete; this trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02481154. RESULTS: Vorasidenib showed a favorable safety profile in the glioma cohort. Dose-limiting toxicities of elevated transaminases occurred at doses ≥100 mg and were reversible. The protocol-defined objective response rate per Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria for LGG in patients with nonenhancing glioma was 18% (one partial response, three minor responses). The median progression-free survival was 36.8 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 11.2-40.8] for patients with nonenhancing glioma and 3.6 months (95% CI, 1.8-6.5) for patients with enhancing glioma. Exploratory evaluation of tumor volumes in patients with nonenhancing glioma showed sustained tumor shrinkage in multiple patients. CONCLUSIONS: Vorasidenib was well tolerated and showed preliminary antitumor activity in patients with recurrent or progressive nonenhancing mIDH LGG.
Authors
Mellinghoff, IK; Penas-Prado, M; Peters, KB; Burris, HA; Maher, EA; Janku, F; Cote, GM; de la Fuente, MI; Clarke, JL; Ellingson, BM; Chun, S; Young, RJ; Liu, H; Choe, S; Lu, M; Le, K; Hassan, I; Steelman, L; Pandya, SS; Cloughesy, TF; Wen, PY
MLA Citation
Mellinghoff, Ingo K., et al. “Vorasidenib, a Dual Inhibitor of Mutant IDH1/2, in Recurrent or Progressive Glioma; Results of a First-in-Human Phase I Trial.Clin Cancer Res, vol. 27, no. 16, Aug. 2021, pp. 4491–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-21-0611.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484773
PMID
34078652
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Cancer Research
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
4491
End Page
4499
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-21-0611

Diffuse midline glioma with H3 K27M-mutation in an 83-year-old woman.

Diffuse midline gliomas harboring histone H3 K27M mutations are most commonly found in the brainstem of children. This mutation confers a WHO grade IV designation and is associated with a particularly poor prognosis. Although traditionally considered to be a disease of children and young adults, a number of recent reports have described H3 K27M mutations in older adults with diffuse midline gliomas. Here, we present the unusual case of a diffuse midline glioma in the pons and cerebellum of an 83-year-old woman and review the evolving clinical literature on this entity in adults. This case underscores that it may occur even in older adults, in whom prognostic and treatment paradigms used in pediatrics may not be directly applicable.
Authors
Low, JT; Wang, S-H; B Peters, K
MLA Citation
Low, Justin Thomas, et al. “Diffuse midline glioma with H3 K27M-mutation in an 83-year-old woman.Cns Oncol, vol. 10, no. 2, June 2021, p. CNS71. Pubmed, doi:10.2217/cns-2020-0030.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1480822
PMID
33908265
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cns Oncology
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
CNS71
DOI
10.2217/cns-2020-0030

Research Areas:

Brain--Tumors
Cancer
Cognition
Quality of Life
Supratentorial brain tumors