Thomas Polascik

Overview:

Prostate cancer imaging
Focal therapy of prostate cancer
Prostate cancer outcomes
Kidney cancer outcomes
Minimally invasive surgery
Nerve sparing cryotherapy

Positions:

Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Urology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1991

The University of Chicago

Intern in General Surgery, Surgery

Johns Hopkins University

Assistant Resident in General Surgery, Surgery

Johns Hopkins University

Resident, Urology

Johns Hopkins University

Chief Resident, Urology

Johns Hopkins University

Assistant Chief of Service, Urology

Johns Hopkins University

Fellowship, Urologic Oncology

Johns Hopkins University

Grants:

Image guided targeted biopsy of clinically significant prostate cancer with acoustic radiation force

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Prostate Cancer Assessment and Treatment Guidance Via Integrated 3D ARFI Elasticity Imaging and Multi-Parametric MRI

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
Kitware Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Early Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer using Ultrasonic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging

Administered By
Biomedical Engineering
Awarded By
United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Prospective registry to optimize clinical care (DUCIMAS)

Administered By
Surgery, Urology
Awarded By
Myriad Genetics, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3 Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Tc-MIP-1404 SPECT/CT Imaging to Detect Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer in Men with Biopsy Proven Low-Grade Prostate Cancer who are Candidates for Active Surveillance(proSPECT-AS)

Administered By
Surgery, Urology
Awarded By
Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Prostate Cancer Focal Therapy Has Made Great Strides and the Future Remains Bright.

Authors
MLA Citation
Polascik, Thomas. “Prostate Cancer Focal Therapy Has Made Great Strides and the Future Remains Bright.Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.), vol. 35, no. 5, May 2021, p. 269. Epmc, doi:10.46883/onc.2021.3505.0269.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484687
PMID
33988352
Source
epmc
Published In
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
269
DOI
10.46883/onc.2021.3505.0269

Evolution of Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Past, Present, and Future

Authors
Arcot, R; Polascik, TJ
MLA Citation
Arcot, R., and T. J. Polascik. “Evolution of Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Past, Present, and Future.” Urologic Clinics of North America, Jan. 2021. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.ucl.2021.07.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1500880
Source
scopus
Published In
The Urologic Clinics of North America
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.ucl.2021.07.011

Editorial Comment.

Authors
Arcot, R; Polascik, TJ
MLA Citation
Arcot, Rohith, and Thomas J. Polascik. “Editorial Comment.The Journal of Urology, vol. 206, no. 5, Nov. 2021, pp. 1182–83. Epmc, doi:10.1097/ju.0000000000001934.01.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496713
PMID
34379453
Source
epmc
Published In
The Journal of Urology
Volume
206
Published Date
Start Page
1182
End Page
1183
DOI
10.1097/ju.0000000000001934.01

Focal Cryoablation of Image-Localized Prostate Cancer.

Focal cryoablation of localized prostate cancer can offer patients superior genitourinary functional outcomes in terms of preservation of urinary continence and potency compared with radical whole-gland therapy, while maintaining intermediate-term oncologic control. We present a step-by-step guide to focal cryoablation of localized prostate cancer. A patient with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) underwent multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the prostate that revealed a prostate imaging-reporting and data system (PI-RADS) four lesion. The patient subsequently had a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided MRI fusion biopsy of the target lesion as well as a systematic biopsy and was only found to have Gleason 3 + 4 prostate cancer in the 0.5 cc mpMRI target. The lesion plus a treatment margin was ablated with cryotherapy utilizing a traditional transperineal approach. Patient position, ultrasound and mpMRI image fusion, insertion of cryoablation needles, ablation of the prostate cancer lesion, and postoperative care were reviewed. Equipment used during the operation was itemized and described. This guide explores the necessary equipment, procedural steps, and tips for success when performing focal cryoablation of the prostate. The technique described represents the culmination of knowledge gathered with 30 years of experience performing cryoablation of prostate cancer. The accompanying video highlights the utilization of mpMRI and TRUS image fusion, triangulation of lethal ice around the prostate cancer lesion, and the importance of monitoring real-time ice formation with TRUS imaging. Cryoablation of prostate cancer can be applied to several clinical scenarios: partial-gland ablation, quadrant, hemiablation, focal-targeted, or whole gland in the primary or salvage settings. We present the surgical steps that are essential for effective focal ablation of image-localized prostate cancer.
Authors
Arcot, R; Potts, BA; Polascik, TJ
MLA Citation
Arcot, Rohith, et al. “Focal Cryoablation of Image-Localized Prostate Cancer.J Endourol, vol. 35, no. S2, Sept. 2021, pp. S17–23. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/end.2021.0411.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497855
PMID
34499551
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Endourol
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
S17
End Page
S23
DOI
10.1089/end.2021.0411

Oncological and Functional Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Individualized Partial Gland Cryoablation of the Prostate: A Single-Institution Experience.

Objectives: We aim at reporting the functional and oncological outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer who underwent individualized partial gland cryoablation of the prostate by using validated quality-of-life instruments. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our cryosurgery database between July 2003 and September 2019 for men who were treated with individualized partial gland cryoablation of the prostate at our tertiary care center. Baseline and periodic urinary and sexual function surveys were administered throughout the post-treatment period. Results: A total of 82 men were included in the study. Median follow-up was 28 months (interquartile range: 10.5-59.3 months). A total of 71 men underwent primary individualized partial gland cryoablation, whereas 11 men underwent salvage partial gland ablation. Failure-free survival at 1 to 5 years was 98%, 89%, 84%, 75%, and 75% in the primary therapy group, and 100%, 80%, and 40% in the salvage group at 1 to 3 years, respectively. In the primary therapy group, all 71 patients remained free of pads at 3 months and throughout the follow-up period. Men who had undergone primary focal cryoablation had a higher post-treatment International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score, followed by men treated with primary hemi-cryoablation and primary subtotal cryoablation. The American Urological Association (AUA) symptom scores decreased regardless of the type of partial gland ablation performed, with subtotal ablation having the lowest score compared with hemiablation and focal cryoablation. No patient developed a fistula in the primary group, and 1 (9%) patient developed a fistula in the salvage group. Conclusion: Individualized partial gland cryoablation of the prostate is able to achieve excellent oncological and functional outcomes in select men with localized prostate cancer.
Authors
Tan, WP; Chang, A; Sze, C; Polascik, TJ
MLA Citation
Tan, Wei Phin, et al. “Oncological and Functional Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Individualized Partial Gland Cryoablation of the Prostate: A Single-Institution Experience.J Endourol, vol. 35, no. 9, Sept. 2021, pp. 1290–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/end.2020.0740.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497856
PMID
33559527
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Endourol
Volume
35
Published Date
Start Page
1290
End Page
1299
DOI
10.1089/end.2020.0740