Bryce Reeve

Overview:

Areas of expertise: Health Measurement and Health Services Research

Positions:

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1994

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

M.A. 1999

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2000

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

Treatment Switching Behavior among Multiple Myeloma Patients

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
Amgen, Inc.
Role
Collaborating Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Patient-Centered Outcomes: Expanding Engagement of the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Community

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Designing Measures of Expressive Communication Ability in Individuals with Angelman Syndrome

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Creating and Validating Child Adverse Event Reporting in Oncology Trials

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Evaluating the Association between Activity and PROMIS Pediatric Measures in Children with Chronic Conditions

Administered By
Population Health Sciences
Awarded By
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Psychometric Evaluation of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire in Men and Women With Heart Failure.

BACKGROUND: The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) has been psychometrically evaluated in multiple heart failure (HF) populations, but the comparability of its psychometric properties between men and women is unknown. METHODS: Data from 3 clinical trials (1 in stable HF with preserved ejection fraction, 1 each in stable and acute HF with reduced ejection fraction) and 1 prospective cohort study (stable HF with reduced ejection fraction), incorporating 6773 men and 3612 women with HF, were used to compare the construct validity, internal and test-retest reliability, ability to detect change, predict mortality and hospitalizations and minimally important differences between the 2 sexes. Interactions of the KCCQ overall summary and subdomain scores by sex were independently examined. RESULTS: The KCCQ-Overall Summary score correlated well with New York Heart Association functional class in both sexes across patients with stable (correlation coefficient: -0.40 in men versus -0.49 in women) and acute (-0.37 in men versus -0.34 in women) HF. All KCCQ subdomains demonstrated concordant relationships with relevant comparison standards with no significant interactions by sex in 19 of 21 of these construct validity analyses. All KCCQ scores were equally predictive and other psychometric evaluations showed similar results by sex: test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.94 in men versus 0.92 in women), responsive to change (standardized response mean 1.01 in both sexes), as were the minimally important differences and internal reliability. CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric properties of the KCCQ, in terms of validity, prognosis, reliability, and sensitivity to change, are comparable in men and women with HF with preserved ejection fraction and HF with reduced ejection fraction.
Authors
Hejjaji, V; Tang, Y; Coles, T; Jones, PG; Reeve, BB; Mentz, RJ; Spatz, ES; Dunlay, SM; Caldwell, B; Saha, A; Tarver, ME; Tran, A; Patel, KK; Henke, D; Piña, IL; Spertus, JA
MLA Citation
Hejjaji, Vittal, et al. “Psychometric Evaluation of the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire in Men and Women With Heart Failure.Circ Heart Fail, vol. 14, no. 9, Sept. 2021, p. e008284. Pubmed, doi:10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.120.008284.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496095
PMID
34465123
Source
pubmed
Published In
Circ Heart Fail
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
e008284
DOI
10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.120.008284

Comparison of PROMIS® Computerized Adaptive Testing versus Fixed Short Forms in Juvenile Myositis.

OBJECTIVE: Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS® ) measures can be administered via computerized adaptive testing (CAT) or fixed short forms (FSF), but the empirical benefits of CAT versus FSF are unknown in juvenile myositis (JM). This study assesses if PROMIS CAT is feasible, precise, correlated with FSF, and less prone to respondent burden and floor/ceiling effects than FSF in JM. METHODS: Patients 8-17 yo (self-report and parent proxy) and parents of patients 5-7 yo (only parent proxy) completed PROMIS Fatigue, Pain Interference, Upper Extremity Function, Mobility, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms measures. Pearson correlations, paired t-tests, and Cohen's D were calculated between PROMIS CAT and FSF. McNemar test assessed floor/ceiling effects between CAT and FSF. Precision and respondent burden were examined across the T-score range. RESULTS: Data from 67 patient-parent dyads were analyzed. CAT and FSF mean scores did not significantly differ except in parent proxy Anxiety and Fatigue (effect size: 0.23 and 0.19, respectively). CAT had less pronounced floor/ceiling effects at the less symptomatic extreme in all domains except self-report Anxiety. Increased item burden and higher standard errors were seen in less symptomatic scorers for CAT. Modified stopping rules limiting CAT item administration did not decrease precision. CONCLUSION: PROMIS CAT appears to be feasible and correlated with FSF. CAT had less pronounced floor/ceiling effects, allowing detection of individual differences in less symptomatic patients. Modified stopping rules for CAT may decrease respondent burden. CAT can be considered for long-term follow-up of JM patients.
Authors
Patel, RN; Esparza, VG; Lai, J-S; Gray, EL; Reeve, BB; Chang, RW; Cella, D; Ardalan, K
MLA Citation
Patel, Ruchi N., et al. “Comparison of PROMIS® Computerized Adaptive Testing versus Fixed Short Forms in Juvenile Myositis.Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken), July 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/acr.24760.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1493106
PMID
34328696
Source
pubmed
Published In
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken)
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/acr.24760

Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Are Not Associated With Future Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity.

BACKGROUND: Studies of adults with Crohn's disease (CD) suggest that poor mental health precedes worsening disease activity. We evaluated whether depression and/or anxiety forecast worsening pediatric CD disease activity. METHODS: Through the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Partners Kids & Teens internet-based cohort, children with CD age 9 to 17 completed Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric measures and the short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI). Using general linear models, we examined how baseline PROMIS Pediatric anxiety and depressive symptom scores independently associate with subsequent sCDAI scores (average survey interval 6.4 months). Models included baseline PROMIS Pediatric anxiety and depressive symptoms scores, baseline sCDAI, sex, age, parental education, race/ethnicity, and prior IBD-related surgery. We performed a post hoc subanalysis of children in baseline remission (sCDAI <150) with otherwise identical models. RESULTS: We analyzed 159 children with CD (mean age 14 years, 45% female, 84% in baseline remission). We found no association between baseline PROMIS Pediatric anxiety score and subsequent sCDAI (change in sCDAI for 3-point change in PROMIS Pediatric -0.89; 95% CI -4.81 to 3.03). Baseline PROMIS Pediatric depressive symptoms score was not associated with future sCDAI (change in sCDAI for 3-point change in PROMIS Pediatric <0.01; 95% CI -4.54 to 4.53). In a subanalysis of patients in remission at baseline, the lack of association remained. CONCLUSION: We found that neither anxiety nor depressive symptoms associate with subsequent disease activity in pediatric CD. These findings contrast with adult IBD studies, thus underschoring the unique pathophysiology, natural history, and outcomes of pediatric CD.
Authors
Brenner, EJ; Long, MD; Mann, CM; Lin, L; Chen, W; Reyes, C; Bahnson, KM; Reeve, BB; Kappelman, MD
MLA Citation
Brenner, Erica J., et al. “Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms Are Not Associated With Future Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity.Inflamm Bowel Dis, July 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/ibd/izab162.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488709
PMID
34245258
Source
pubmed
Published In
Inflamm Bowel Dis
Published Date
DOI
10.1093/ibd/izab162

Validity and Responsiveness of the Patient-reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Children With Ulcerative Colitis.

OBJECTIVES: Patient-reported outcome measures allow children to directly report on their health and well-being. We assessed the construct validity and responsiveness of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric measures in children and adolescents with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: Through the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Partners Kids & Teens' Internet-based cohort, children with UC reported symptoms related to disease activity (Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index), IMPACT-III health-related quality of life measure, and 5 PROMIS Pediatric measures (anxiety, depressive symptoms, pain interference, fatigue, and peer relationships). We included participants aged 9 to 17 years and conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal, mixed-linear regression analyses to examine the extent to which PROMIS Pediatric scores are associated with and respond to changes in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index and IMPACT-III. RESULTS: We evaluated 91 participants with UC (mean age 13 years, 57% girls). Better PROMIS Pediatric scores were associated with lower disease activity, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. For a change from moderate/severe to remission, observed effect estimates were -5.1 points for anxiety, -5.0 for depressive symptoms, -14.7 for pain interference, -13.7 for fatigue, and 5.3 for peer relationships (P < 0.05 for all domains). Better PROMIS Pediatric scores were associated with improved IMPACT-III scores (P values <0.01), and changes in scores were moderately correlated with changes in IMPACT-III over time (adjusted P values <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence for the construct validity and longitudinal responsiveness of the PROMIS Pediatric measures in pediatric patients with UC, thus supporting their use in clinical research and patient care.
Authors
Brenner, EJ; Long, MD; Mann, CM; Lin, L; Chen, W; Reyes, C; Bahnson, KM; Reeve, BB; Kappelman, MD
MLA Citation
Brenner, Erica J., et al. “Validity and Responsiveness of the Patient-reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Children With Ulcerative Colitis.J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, vol. 73, no. 1, July 2021, pp. 67–72. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/MPG.0000000000003101.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475616
PMID
33633083
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr
Volume
73
Published Date
Start Page
67
End Page
72
DOI
10.1097/MPG.0000000000003101

Enabling patient-reported outcome measures in clinical trials, exemplified by cardiovascular trials.

OBJECTIVES: There has been limited success in achieving integration of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials. We describe how stakeholders envision a solution to this challenge. METHODS: Stakeholders from academia, industry, non-profits, insurers, clinicians, and the Food and Drug Administration convened at a Think Tank meeting funded by the Duke Clinical Research Institute to discuss the challenges of incorporating PROs into clinical trials and how to address those challenges. Using examples from cardiovascular trials, this article describes a potential path forward with a focus on applications in the United States. RESULTS: Think Tank members identified one key challenge: a common understanding of the level of evidence that is necessary to support patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in trials. Think Tank participants discussed the possibility of creating general evidentiary standards depending upon contextual factors, but such guidelines could not be feasibly developed because many contextual factors are at play. The attendees posited that a more informative approach to PROM evidentiary standards would be to develop validity arguments akin to courtroom briefs, which would emphasize a compelling rationale (interpretation/use argument) to support a PROM within a specific context. Participants envisioned a future in which validity arguments would be publicly available via a repository, which would be indexed by contextual factors, clinical populations, and types of claims. CONCLUSIONS: A publicly available repository would help stakeholders better understand what a community believes constitutes compelling support for a specific PROM in a trial. Our proposed strategy is expected to facilitate the incorporation of PROMs into cardiovascular clinical trials and trials in general.
Authors
Coles, TM; Hernandez, AF; Reeve, BB; Cook, K; Edwards, MC; Boutin, M; Bush, E; Degboe, A; Roessig, L; Rudolph, A; McNulty, P; Patel, N; Kay-Mugford, T; Vernon, M; Woloschak, M; Buchele, G; Spertus, JA; Roe, MT; Bury, D; Weinfurt, K
MLA Citation
Coles, Theresa M., et al. “Enabling patient-reported outcome measures in clinical trials, exemplified by cardiovascular trials.Health Qual Life Outcomes, vol. 19, no. 1, June 2021, p. 164. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s12955-021-01800-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1485220
PMID
34120618
Source
pubmed
Published In
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
164
DOI
10.1186/s12955-021-01800-1