April Salama

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Internal Medicine

The University of Chicago

Hematology/Oncology

The University of Chicago

Grants:

Collaborative Success: Expanding Options for Patients with Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Project Lead
Start Date
End Date

A Multicenter, Open label, Phase III Extension Trial to Study the Long-term Safety and Efficacy in Participants with Advanced Tumors Who Are Currently on Treatment or in Follow-up in a Pembrolizumab Trial.

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merck Sharp & Dohme
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

INCB 24360-208 A Phase 1/2, Open-Label, Dose-Escalation, Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy Study of Epacadostat and Nivolumab in Combination With Immune Therapies in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Malignancies (ECHO-208)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Incyte Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Randomized Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with Nivolumab Combined with Ipilimumab versus Nivolumab Monotherapy after Complete Resection of Stage IIIb/c/d or Stage IV Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase II Randomized, Open-label, Multi-center Study of the Safety and Efficacy of IMCgp100 Compared with Investigator's Choice in HLA-A*0201 Positive Patients with Previously Untreated Advanced Uveal Melanoma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Immunocore Limited
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Biomarkers in lung cancer: from early detection to novel therapeutics and decision making.

Lung cancer remains a significant cause of mortality worldwide. While advances in therapy continue to be made, the overall prognosis for patients diagnosed with lung cancer remains poor. Historically, markers such as age, performance status and disease stage have been used to risk-stratify patients and guide therapeutic decisions. These parameters provide some useful information, but more sensitive markers are clearly needed. Molecular and genetic studies have identified several such markers, which appear to play critical roles in carcinogenesis and affect patient outcomes. This article reviews a number of biomarkers that have been identified in lung cancer, and their prognostic and predictive roles.
Authors
Scott, A; Salgia, R
MLA Citation
Scott, April, and Ravi Salgia. “Biomarkers in lung cancer: from early detection to novel therapeutics and decision making.Biomarkers in Medicine, vol. 2, no. 6, Dec. 2008, pp. 577–86. Epmc, doi:10.2217/17520363.2.6.577.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1447608
PMID
19802373
Source
epmc
Published In
Biomarkers in Medicine
Volume
2
Published Date
Start Page
577
End Page
586
DOI
10.2217/17520363.2.6.577

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 4.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are characterized by a progressive accumulation of leukemic cells in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymphoid tissues. Treatment of CLL/SLL has evolved significantly in recent years because of the improved understanding of the disease biology and the development of novel targeted therapies. In patients with indications for initiating treatment, the selection of treatment should be based on the disease stage, patient's age and overall fitness (performance status and comorbid conditions), and cytogenetic abnormalities. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with CLL/SLL.
Authors
Wierda, WG; Byrd, JC; Abramson, JS; Bilgrami, SF; Bociek, G; Brander, D; Brown, J; Chanan-Khan, AA; Chavez, JC; Coutre, SE; Davis, RS; Fletcher, CD; Hill, B; Kahl, BS; Kamdar, M; Kaplan, LD; Khan, N; Kipps, TJ; Lim, MS; Ma, S; Malek, S; Mato, A; Mosse, C; Shadman, M; Siddiqi, T; Stephens, D; Sundaram, S; Wagner, N; Dwyer, M; Sundar, H
MLA Citation
Wierda, William G., et al. “Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 4.2020, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 18, no. 2, Feb. 2020, pp. 185–217. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432416
PMID
32023533
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
185
End Page
217
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0006

Phase 1b/2, open label, multicenter, study of the combination of SD-101 and pembrolizumab in patients with advanced melanoma who are naïve to anti-PD-1 therapy.

Authors
Ribas, A; Milhem, MM; Hoimes, CJ; Amin, A; Mehmi, I; Lao, CD; Conry, RM; Shaheen, MF; Jang, S; Salama, AKS; Deva, S; Medina, TM; Schmidt, EV; Leung, ACF; Xing, B; Janssen, R; Long, GV
MLA Citation
Ribas, Antoni, et al. “Phase 1b/2, open label, multicenter, study of the combination of SD-101 and pembrolizumab in patients with advanced melanoma who are naïve to anti-PD-1 therapy.Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 36, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2018, pp. 9513–9513. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2018.36.15_suppl.9513.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1441061
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
36
Published Date
Start Page
9513
End Page
9513
DOI
10.1200/jco.2018.36.15_suppl.9513

A phase 2 study of glembatumumab vedotin (GV), an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeting gpNMB, in advanced melanoma

Authors
Ott, PA; Pavlick, AC; Johnson, DB; Hart, LL; Infante, JR; Luke, JJ; Lutzky, J; Rothschild, N; Spitler, L; Cowey, CL; Alizadeh, A; Salama, A; He, Y; Bagley, RG; Zhang, J; Hamid, O
MLA Citation
Ott, P. A., et al. “A phase 2 study of glembatumumab vedotin (GV), an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeting gpNMB, in advanced melanoma.” Annals of Oncology, vol. 27, 2016, p. vi393. Scopus, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdw379.42.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1241581
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
vi393
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdw379.42

Final overall survival for KEYNOTE-002: pembrolizumab (pembro) versus investigator-choice chemotherapy (chemo) for ipilimumab (ipi)-refractory melanoma

Authors
Hamid, O; Puzanov, I; Dummer, R; Schachter, J; Daud, A; Schadendorf, D; Blank, C; Cranmer, LD; Robert, C; Pavlick, AC; Gonzalez, R; Hodi, FS; Ascierto, PA; Salama, A; Margolin, KA; Gangadhar, TC; Wei, Z; Ebbinghaus, SW; Ibrahim, N; Ribas, A
MLA Citation
Hamid, O., et al. “Final overall survival for KEYNOTE-002: pembrolizumab (pembro) versus investigator-choice chemotherapy (chemo) for ipilimumab (ipi)-refractory melanoma.” Annals of Oncology, vol. 27, Oct. 2016, p. vi379. Scopus, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdw379.02.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1435856
Source
scopus
Published In
Annals of Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
vi379
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdw379.02