Sarah Sammons

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2012

Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Internal Medicine Residency

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Hematology-Oncology Fellowship

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Phase II Multicenter Study of Durvalumab (MEDI4736) and Olaparib in PlatinumTreated Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer ¿ DORA

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Duke University
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Determining the clinical efficacy and predictive biomarkers of mirvetuximab soravtansine (IMGN853) in folate receptor alpha (FRA) expressing, chemotherapy refractory triple negative breast cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

TNBC Study

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
AstraZeneca AB
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Phase 3 Study of Nivolumab VersusPlacebo in Combination With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Patients WithHigh-risk, Estrogen Receptor-Positive (ER+), Human Epider

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1a/1b Study of LY3484356 Administered as Monotherapy and in Combination with Abemaciclib to Patients with ER+, HER2-Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Eli Lilly and Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Metastatic breast cancer: Who benefits from surgery?

BACKGROUND: We sought to identify characteristics of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients who may benefit most from primary tumor resection. METHODS: Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to categorize non-surgical patients with de novo MBC in the NCDB (2010-2015) into 3 groups (I/II/III) based on 3-year overall survival (OS). After bootstrapping (BS), group-level profiles were applied, and the association of surgery with OS was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: All patients benefitted from surgery (median OS, surgery vs no surgery): 72.7 vs 42.9 months, 47.3 vs 30.4 months, 23.8 vs 14.4 months (all p < 0.001) in BS-groups I, II, and III, respectively. After adjustment, surgery remained associated with improved OS (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.50-0.55). The effect of surgery on OS differed quantitatively across groups. CONCLUSION: Prognostic groups may inform the degree of benefit from surgery, with the greatest benefit seen in those with the most favorable survival.
MLA Citation
Marks, Caitlin E., et al. “Metastatic breast cancer: Who benefits from surgery?Am J Surg, July 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2021.07.018.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1493295
PMID
34325907
Source
pubmed
Published In
Am J Surg
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2021.07.018

HER2-positive breast cancer

The treatment of HER2-positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (mBC) has drastically evolved with the clinical success and approval of several HER2-directed therapies, including trastuzumab, pertuzumab, trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), and lapatinib. Standard of care first-line therapy for HER2+ mBC is the combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and a taxane. After progression, T-DM1 is the most supported choice for second-line therapy. Once patients have received trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and T-DM1 in the metastatic setting, there is little evidence for the optimal sequence or duration of HER2-directed therapy, and clinical trials should be considered. Continuing HER2-targeted therapies following progression on trastuzumab has shown benefit. Lapatinib combination therapies are clinically efficacious in heavily pretreated populations. Sequential single-agent chemotherapy with trastuzumab is a reasonable approach in later lines of therapy.
Authors
Sammons, S; Blackwell, K
MLA Citation
Sammons, S., and K. Blackwell. “HER2-positive breast cancer.” HER2-Positive Breast Cancer, 2018, pp. 63–74. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-58122-6.00004-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462962
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
63
End Page
74
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-323-58122-6.00004-0

Real-world Evidence of Diagnostic Testing and Treatment Patterns in US Patients With Breast Cancer With Implications for Treatment Biomarkers From RNA Sequencing Data.

<h4>Objective/background</h4>We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal real-world data (RWD) from patients with breast cancer to replicate results from clinical studies and demonstrate the feasibility of generating real-world evidence. We also assessed the value of transcriptome profiling as a complementary tool for determining molecular subtypes.<h4>Methods</h4>De-identified, longitudinal data were analyzed after abstraction from records of patients with breast cancer in the United States (US) structured and stored in the Tempus database. Demographics, clinical characteristics, molecular subtype, treatment history, and survival outcomes were assessed according to strict qualitative criteria. RNA sequencing and clinical data were used to predict molecular subtypes and signaling pathway enrichment.<h4>Results</h4>The clinical abstraction cohort (n = 4000) mirrored the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with breast cancer in the US, indicating feasibility for RWE generation. Among patients who were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2<sup>+</sup>), 74.2% received anti-HER2 therapy, with ∼70% starting within 3 months of a positive test result. Most non-treated patients were early stage. In this RWD set, 31.7% of patients with HER2<sup>+</sup> immunohistochemistry (IHC) had discordant fluorescence in situ hybridization results recorded. Among patients with multiple HER2 IHC results at diagnosis, 18.6% exhibited intra-test discordance. Through development of a whole-transcriptome model to predict IHC receptor status in the molecular sequenced cohort (n = 400), molecular subtypes were resolved for all patients (n = 36) with equivocal HER2 statuses from abstracted test results. Receptor-related signaling pathways were differentially enriched between clinical molecular subtypes.<h4>Conclusions</h4>RWD in the Tempus database mirrors the overall population of patients with breast cancer in the US. These results suggest that real-time, RWD analyses are feasible in a large, highly heterogeneous database. Furthermore, molecular data may aid deficiencies and discrepancies observed from breast cancer RWD.
Authors
Fernandes, LE; Epstein, CG; Bobe, AM; Bell, JSK; Stumpe, MC; Salazar, ME; Salahudeen, AA; Pe Benito, RA; McCarter, C; Leibowitz, BD; Kase, M; Igartua, C; Huether, R; Hafez, A; Beaubier, N; Axelson, MD; Pegram, MD; Sammons, SL; O'Shaughnessy, JA; Palmer, GA
MLA Citation
Fernandes, Louis E., et al. “Real-world Evidence of Diagnostic Testing and Treatment Patterns in US Patients With Breast Cancer With Implications for Treatment Biomarkers From RNA Sequencing Data.Clinical Breast Cancer, vol. 21, no. 4, Aug. 2021, pp. e340–61. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.clbc.2020.11.012.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1472859
PMID
33446413
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Breast Cancer
Volume
21
Published Date
Start Page
e340
End Page
e361
DOI
10.1016/j.clbc.2020.11.012

Receptor discordance in breast cancer brain metastases: when knowledge is power.

MLA Citation
Sammons, Sarah, et al. “Receptor discordance in breast cancer brain metastases: when knowledge is power.Neuro Oncol, vol. 22, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. 1060–61. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/neuonc/noaa131.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1457339
PMID
32479604
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neuro Oncol
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
1060
End Page
1061
DOI
10.1093/neuonc/noaa131

Survival Outcomes Among Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: Review of 47,000 Patients.

<h4>Background</h4>Although metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains incurable, advances in therapies have improved survival. Using a contemporary dataset of de novo MBC patients, we explore how overall (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) changed over time.<h4>Methods</h4>All patients with de novo MBC from 1988 to 2016 were selected from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18. Unadjusted OS and CSS were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and stratified by disease characteristics. Cox proportional hazards models determined factors associated with survival.<h4>Results</h4>47,034 patients were included, with median OS of 25 months and CSS of 27 months. Survival steadily improved over time (1988: 1-year OS 62%, CSS 65%; 2015: 1-year OS 72%, CSS 74%). Patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) had the worst prognosis and were most likely to die from MBC [versus human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ and hormone receptor (HR)+/HER2-]. Those with ≥ 4 sites of metastatic disease were also more likely to die from MBC with nearly identical OS and CSS (5-year OS 9%, CSS 9%), when compared with those with 1 site (5-year OS 31%, CSS 35%). After adjustment, improved CSS was associated with bone-only disease [hazard ratio (HR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.94], while TNBC (versus HER2+: HR 3.12, 95% CI 2.89-3.36) and > 3 sites of metastatic disease (versus 1 site: HR 3.24, 95% CI 2.68-3.91) were associated with worse CSS (all p < 0.001).<h4>Conclusions</h4>Accurate prognostic estimates are essential for patient care. As treatments for patients with MBC have expanded, OS and CSS have improved, and more patients, particularly with limited distant disease or favorable tumor subtypes, are also dying from non-MBC causes.
Authors
Taskindoust, M; Thomas, SM; Sammons, SL; Fayanju, OM; DiLalla, G; Hwang, ES; Plichta, JK
MLA Citation
Taskindoust, Mahsa, et al. “Survival Outcomes Among Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: Review of 47,000 Patients.Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 28, no. 12, 2021, pp. 7441–49. Epmc, doi:10.1245/s10434-021-10227-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476929
PMID
34050430
Source
epmc
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
7441
End Page
7449
DOI
10.1245/s10434-021-10227-3