Kristin Schroeder

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics, Hematology-Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Research Professor of Global Health

Duke Global Health Institute
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.P.H. 2002

West Virginia University

M.D. 2007

Georgetown University School of Medicine

Pediatric Internship and Residency

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Medicine

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Fellowship, Pediatrics Hem/Onc

Duke University School of Medicine

Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Fellowship, Tisch Brain Tumor Center

Duke University School of Medicine

Global Health Fellowship, Hubert Yeargen Center For Global Health

Duke University

Grants:

Stimulate Research in HIV/AIDS Cancer Research Projects at NCI-designated Cancer Centers

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

AIDS MALIGNANCY CONSORTIUM

Administered By
Pediatrics, Hematology-Oncology
Awarded By
University of California - Los Angeles
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Pediatric cancer outcomes after the implementation of a residential hostel in Tanzania.

BACKGROUND: A large survival disparity exists for pediatric cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries compared with high-income countries. A variety of factors contribute to this gap, including late-stage disease at presentation, high rates of abandonment of care, and lack of supportive care infrastructure. A residential hostel was established in Mwanza, Tanzania, to reduce barriers to accessing and maintaining care among patients being treated for childhood cancer at a regional referral hospital. This study examines the effect of the hostel on one-year survival and treatment abandonment for children diagnosed with cancer. METHODS: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for all patients presenting from May 2017 to April 2018, following the establishment of a pediatric cancer hostel at the referral hospital. Active follow-up was used to confirm survival data. RESULTS: There were 149 patients who presented to the referral hospital during the study period with 130 eligible for evaluation. A total of 34% (n = 44) used the hostel services and 66% did not use the hostel (n = 86). Patients who used the hostel did not significantly differ by age, sex, or diagnosis compared with patients who did not use the hostel. Patients who used the hostel had lower treatment abandonment (27% vs 37%) and higher one-year overall survival (47% vs 37%) compared with patients who did not use the hostel. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest key supportive programs such as a family hostel may be beneficial for patients with childhood cancer and can improve pediatric cancer treatment outcomes in LMICs.
Authors
Morgan, A; Watt, M; Zullig, L; Sued, H; Schroeder, K
MLA Citation
Morgan, Austin, et al. “Pediatric cancer outcomes after the implementation of a residential hostel in Tanzania.Pediatr Blood Cancer, May 2022, p. e29758. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/pbc.29758.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1521574
PMID
35593643
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatr Blood Cancer
Published Date
Start Page
e29758
DOI
10.1002/pbc.29758

Factors contributing to delayed childhood cancer care in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review protocol.

BACKGROUND: Significant disparities exist for timely access to cancer care for children, with the highest disparities in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study aims to conduct a systematic review that identifies the factors contributing to delayed care of childhood cancers in LMICs. METHODS: We will conduct a systematic review with search strings compliant with the PICO framework: (1) the Population-children (aged 0-18 years) from LMICs; (2) the Exposure-factors contributing to timely childhood cancer care; (3) the Outcome-delays in childhood cancer care. DISCUSSION: Our study is an essential step to guide strategic interventions to assess the myriad of factors that prevent children from accessing timely cancer care in LMICs. The results will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal and shared with institutions related to the field.
Authors
Cotache-Condor, C; Grimm, A; Williamson, J; Kantety, V; Landrum, K; Schroeder, K; Staton, CA; Majaliwa, E; Rice, HE; Smith, ER
MLA Citation
Cotache-Condor, Cesia, et al. “Factors contributing to delayed childhood cancer care in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review protocol.Pediatr Blood Cancer, vol. 69, no. 5, May 2022, p. e29646. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/pbc.29646.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1512263
PMID
35253351
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pediatr Blood Cancer
Volume
69
Published Date
Start Page
e29646
DOI
10.1002/pbc.29646

Use of Mhealth Application to Improve Pediatric Cancer Treatment Protocol Compliance in Low Resource Settings

Authors
Joo, E; Gisiri, M; Raveendran, Y; Masalu, N; Afyusisye, F; Goel, K; Penny, C; Horwitz, E; Vasudevan, L; Makarushka, C; Schroeder, K
MLA Citation
Joo, E., et al. “Use of Mhealth Application to Improve Pediatric Cancer Treatment Protocol Compliance in Low Resource Settings.” Pediatric Blood & Cancer, vol. 68, 2021, pp. S445–S445.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503187
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
68
Published Date
Start Page
S445
End Page
S445

Burkitt Lymphoma Outcomes Following Implementation of Tanzania National Treatment Guidelines

Authors
Gisiri, M; Joo, E; Penny, C; Horwitz, E; Makarushka, C; Vasudevan, L; Schroeder, K
MLA Citation
Gisiri, M., et al. “Burkitt Lymphoma Outcomes Following Implementation of Tanzania National Treatment Guidelines.” Pediatric Blood & Cancer, vol. 68, 2021, pp. S79–80.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503188
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
68
Published Date
Start Page
S79
End Page
S80

Beliefs, Brokers, and Networks: Health System Determinants of Childhood Cancer Drug Access in Five East African Countries

Authors
Petricca, K; Macharia, W; Githanga, J; McLigeyo, A; Njuguna, F; Kambugu, J; Schroeder, K; Laiti, R; Kanyamuhunga, A; Hailu, D; Katabalo, D; Nepomuscene, J; Rogo, K; Gupta, S; Denburg, A
MLA Citation
Petricca, K., et al. “Beliefs, Brokers, and Networks: Health System Determinants of Childhood Cancer Drug Access in Five East African Countries.” Pediatric Blood & Cancer, vol. 68, 2021, pp. S387–88.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1503201
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Volume
68
Published Date
Start Page
S387
End Page
S388

Research Areas:

Global Oncology
Pediatric Neuro-oncology
Pediatrics