Rebecca Shelby

Overview:

Rebecca Shelby, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and the Director of Education and Training for the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.  Dr. Shelby is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Shelby completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.  Her research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions for cancer patients, management of cancer pain and treatment side effects, and improving adherence to recommended care. Dr. Shelby serves on the Duke clinical psychology internship faculty and supervises clinical psychology fellows, interns, and clinical psychology graduate practicum students completing clinical rotations as part of the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.   

Positions:

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2006

Ohio State University

Grants:

Improving Adherence to Recommended Surveillance in Breast Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A feasible and acceptable multicultural psychosocial intervention targeting symptom management in the context of advanced breast cancer.

OBJECTIVE: Advanced breast cancer patients around the world experience high symptom burden (ie, distress, pain, and fatigue) and are in need of psychosocial interventions that target symptom management. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and engagement of a psychosocial intervention that uses cognitive-behavioral strategies along with mindfulness and values-based activity to enhance patients' ability to manage symptoms of advanced disease in a cross-cultural setting (United States and Singapore). Pre-treatment to post-treatment outcomes for distress, pain, and fatigue were compared between intervention recipients and waitlisted controls. METHODS: A pilot randomized controlled trial included women with advanced breast cancer (N = 85) that were recruited in the United States and Singapore. Participants either received the four session intervention or were put on a waitlist. Descriptive statistics and effect size of symptom change were calculated. RESULTS: The psychosocial intervention was found to be feasible as indicated through successful trial accrual, low study attrition (15% ), and high intervention adherence (77% completed all sessions). Acceptability (ie, program satisfaction and cultural sensitivity) and engagement to the study intervention (ie, practice of skills taught) were also high. Anxiety, depression, and fatigue scores remained stable or improved among intervention participants while the same symptoms worsened in the control group. In general, effect sizes are larger in the US sample compared with the Singapore sample. CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive-behavioral, mindfulness, and values-based intervention is feasible, acceptable, and engaging for advanced breast cancer patients in a cross-cultural setting and has potential for efficacy. Further larger-scaled study of intervention efficacy is warranted.
Authors
Teo, I; Vilardaga, JP; Tan, YP; Winger, J; Cheung, YB; Yang, GM; Finkelstein, EA; Shelby, RA; Kamal, AH; Kimmick, G; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1421436
PMID
31703146
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychooncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/pon.5275

WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION

Authors
Dorfman, CS; Winger, JG; Somers, T; Shelby, RA; Kimmick, G; Craighead, L; Patel, ML; Keefe, FJ
MLA Citation
Dorfman, Caroline S., et al. “WEIGHT-RELATED BEHAVIORS OF CANCER SURVIVORS & PARTNERS: INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT AND RESULTS OF A PILOT DYADIC INTERVENTION.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 53, OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2019, pp. S709–S709.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1398066
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
53
Published Date
Start Page
S709
End Page
S709

Development and pilot testing of an mHealth behavioral cancer pain protocol for medically underserved communities

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The purpose of this study was to refine and test a mobile-health behavioral cancer pain coping skills training protocol for women with breast cancer and pain from medically underserved areas. Three focus groups (Phase 1) were used to refine the initial protocol. A single-arm pilot trial (Phase 2) was conducted to assess feasibility, acceptability, and changes in outcomes. The intervention was delivered at a community-based clinic via videoconferencing technology. Participants were women (N = 19 for Phase 1 and N = 20 for Phase 2) with breast cancer and pain in medically underserved areas. Major themes from focus groups were used to refine the intervention. The refined intervention demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Participants reported significant improvement in pain severity, pain interference, and self-efficacy for pain management. Our intervention is feasible, acceptable, and likely to lead to improvement in pain-related outcomes for breast cancer patients in medically underserved areas. Implications for Psychosocial Oncology Practice Breast cancer patients being treated in medically underserved areas have a dearth of exposure to behavioral interventions that may improve their ability to manage pain. Evidence from this single-arm pilot trial suggests that our mobile-health behavioral cancer pain coping skills training protocol is acceptable and feasible in this vulnerable population. Appropriately adapted mobile-health technologies may provide an avenue to reach underserved patients and implement behavioral interventions to improve pain management.
Authors
Dorfman, CS; Kelleher, SA; Winger, JG; Shelby, RA; Thorn, BE; Sutton, LM; Keefe, FJ; Gandhi, V; Manohar, P; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Dorfman, C. S., et al. “Development and pilot testing of an mHealth behavioral cancer pain protocol for medically underserved communities.” Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, vol. 37, no. 3, 2019, pp. 335–49. Scopus, doi:10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1253178
Source
scopus
Published In
Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
335
End Page
349
DOI
10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327

Positive and negative mood following imaging-guided core needle breast biopsy and receipt of biopsy results.

Positive and negative mood are independent psychological responses to stressful events. Negative mood negatively impacts well-being and co-occurring positive mood leads to improved adjustment. Women undergoing core needle breast biopsies (CNB) experience distress during CNB and awaiting results; however, influences of mood are not well known. This longitudinal study examines psychosocial and biopsy- and spirituality-related factors associated with mood in patients day of CNB and one week after receiving results. Ninety women undergoing CNB completed questionnaires on psychosocial factors (chronic stress, social support), biopsy experiences (pain, radiologist communication), and spirituality (peace, meaning, faith) day of CNB. Measures of positive and negative mood were completed day of CNB and one week after receiving results (benign n = 50; abnormal n = 25). Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Greater positive mood correlated with greater peace (β = .25, p = .02) day of CNB. Lower negative mood correlated with greater peace (β = -.29, p = .004) and there was a trend for a relationship with less pain during CNB (β = .19, p = .07). For patients with benign results, day of CNB positive mood predicted positive mood post-results (β = .31, p = .03) and only chronic stress predicted negative mood (β = .33, p = .03). For women with abnormal results, greater meaning day of CNB predicted lower negative mood post-results (β = -.45, p = .03). Meaning and peace may be important for women undergoing CNB and receiving abnormal results.
Authors
Perlman, KL; Shelby, RA; Wren, AA; Kelleher, SA; Dorfman, CS; O'Connor, E; Kim, C; Johnson, KS; Soo, MS
MLA Citation
Perlman, Katherine L., et al. “Positive and negative mood following imaging-guided core needle breast biopsy and receipt of biopsy results..” Psychol Health Med, vol. 22, no. 10, Dec. 2017, pp. 1149–62. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/13548506.2016.1271438.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1162773
PMID
28007008
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychol Health Med
Volume
22
Published Date
Start Page
1149
End Page
1162
DOI
10.1080/13548506.2016.1271438

A HYBRID IN-PERSON AND MHEALTH PAIN COPING SKILLS INTERVENTION FOR STEM CELL TRANSPLANT PATIENTS

MLA Citation
Kelleher, Sarah A., et al. “A HYBRID IN-PERSON AND MHEALTH PAIN COPING SKILLS INTERVENTION FOR STEM CELL TRANSPLANT PATIENTS.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 49, SPRINGER, Apr. 2015, pp. S216–S216.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1125820
Source
wos
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
49
Published Date
Start Page
S216
End Page
S216