Rebecca Shelby

Overview:

Rebecca Shelby, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor with Tenure in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and the Director of Education and Training for the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.  Dr. Shelby is a member of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program and the Duke Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program. Dr. Shelby completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at the Ohio State University and her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.  Her research focuses on developing and evaluating behavioral interventions for cancer patients, management of cancer pain and treatment side effects, and improving adherence to recommended care. Dr. Shelby serves on the Duke clinical psychology internship faculty and supervises clinical psychology fellows, interns, and clinical psychology graduate practicum students completing clinical rotations as part of the Duke Cancer Patient Support Program.   

Positions:

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2006

Ohio State University

Grants:

Improving Adherence to Recommended Surveillance in Breast Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Mammography Pain in Breast Cancer Survivors

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine & Neurosciences
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
PI-Fellow
Start Date
End Date

Best Quality of Care from a Distance (BQal-D): Maintaining High Quality Care for Hormone Receptor Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer during the COVID Pandemic

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

The importance of the person/patient/survivor's lived experience across the cancer control continuum.

Authors
Bovbjerg, DH; Manculich, J; Shelby, RA
MLA Citation
Bovbjerg, Dana H., et al. “The importance of the person/patient/survivor's lived experience across the cancer control continuum.Cancer, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33878.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496219
PMID
34499357
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33878

Managing female sexual dysfunction.

OBJECTIVE: Provide an overview of sexual dysfunction in female urologic cancer patients, approaches for assessing sexual problems, and interventions to treat sexual dysfunction in this patient population. METHODS: A review of the literature in urologic oncology was conducted. Research on other female pelvic cancers with similar treatments was also reviewed. RESULTS: Sexual health is an important element of women's quality of life that is often not discussed and problems remain unaddressed. Urologic cancer treatments commonly result in sexual dysfunction (e.g., dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, problems with orgasm) in female patients, although more research is necessary to understand the impact of non-surgical treatments (e.g., radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy). As such, provider teams should complete necessary screening for sexual dysfunction during and after treatment. The 5 A's model (i.e., Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, Arrange Follow-Up) provides a helpful guide for communicating about and addressing sexual health concerns with patients during the screening process. If it is determined that referral for further assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction is needed, a number of non-pharmacologic (e.g., pelvic floor physical therapy; psychosexual counseling) and pharmacologic treatment approaches are available. CONCLUSION: Sexual dysfunction is common in female urologic cancer survivors. Routine assessment and appropriate referral are essential for high quality patient care.
Authors
Arthur, SS; Dorfman, CS; Massa, LA; Shelby, RA
MLA Citation
Arthur, Sarah S., et al. “Managing female sexual dysfunction.Urol Oncol, July 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.urolonc.2021.06.006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487466
PMID
34247907
Source
pubmed
Published In
Urol Oncol
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.urolonc.2021.06.006

Replicating dissemination and identifying mechanisms of implementation of an empirically supported treatment.

OBJECTIVE: Implementation research is needed in cancer control. Replication of the dissemination of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is important as is the identification of mechanisms by which dissemination leads to implementation. Addressing these gaps, Study 1 (Cohorts 3-6, N = 104) tests for replication of a successful dissemination to community providers (Brothers et al., 2015; Cohorts 1-2; N = 62) and Study 2 (Cohorts 1-6) tests providers' changes on dissemination outcomes as mechanisms of EST usage. METHOD: The Biobehavioral Intervention (BBI), a psychological EST in cancer control, was disseminated to oncology mental health providers using manual provision, didactics, roleplays, and other strategies. Study 1 tested for pre/post changes in dissemination outcomes (BBI knowledge/skills and attitudes toward and self-efficacy to deliver ESTs/BBI) between cohorts (1-2 vs. 3-6) with repeated measures ANOVAs. In Study 2, the implementation outcome was providers' (N = 166) BBI usage with patients (percent treated). Structural equation models tested dissemination outcome changes as predictors of usage at 2- and 4-months. RESULTS: Study 1 replicated high dissemination outcomes and significant gains in BBI knowledge (p < .001) in Cohorts 3-6. Unlike Cohorts 1-2, significant gains were observed in self-efficacy (ps < .001) but not attitudes toward ESTs (p = .523) in Cohorts 3-6. In Study 2, gains in providers' self-efficacy (ps < .05) and EST attitudes (p = .008) predicted greater 2-month (58.4% ± 35.5%) and 4-month (66.2% ± 35.0%) usage of the BBI with patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the only replication of a dissemination for a psychological EST in cancer control. Results reliably show disseminations enhancing providers' self-efficacy to use and positive attitudes toward ESTs as mechanisms for EST implementation. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).
Authors
Lo, SB; Conley, CC; Brothers, BM; Ryba, MM; Frierson, GF; Shelby, RA; Thornton, LM; Carpenter, KM; Andersen, BL
MLA Citation
Lo, Stephen B., et al. “Replicating dissemination and identifying mechanisms of implementation of an empirically supported treatment.Health Psychol, vol. 40, no. 7, July 2021, pp. 450–58. Pubmed, doi:10.1037/hea0001094.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1495054
PMID
34435796
Source
pubmed
Published In
Health Psychology
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
450
End Page
458
DOI
10.1037/hea0001094

DEVELOPMENT OF A BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION FOR SURVIVORS OF YOUNG ADULT CANCER

MLA Citation
Dorfman, Caroline S., et al. “DEVELOPMENT OF A BEHAVIORAL SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION FOR SURVIVORS OF YOUNG ADULT CANCER.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 55, 2021, pp. S144–S144.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484784
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
55
Published Date
Start Page
S144
End Page
S144

IMPACT OF CONTROLLED BREATHING AND MUSIC ON PAIN IN WOMEN UNDERGOING MRI-GUIDED BREAST BIOPSY: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Authors
MLA Citation
Van Denburg, Alyssa N., et al. “IMPACT OF CONTROLLED BREATHING AND MUSIC ON PAIN IN WOMEN UNDERGOING MRI-GUIDED BREAST BIOPSY: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 55, 2021, pp. S269–S269.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484786
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume
55
Published Date
Start Page
S269
End Page
S269