Chanjuan Shi

Overview:

Dr. Shi is a gastrointestinal (GI)/liver pathologist. Her particular areas of interest are GI and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and pancreatic pathology. Her research interests include 1)  Pathobiology of GI and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and 2) Identification of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers for colorectal and pancreatic cancers


Positions:

Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1989

Zhejiang University (China)

Ph.D. 2002

Dalhousie University (Canada)

Publications:

Lysophosphatidic acid receptor signaling in mammalian retinal pigment epithelial cells.

PURPOSE: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid growth factor that stimulates proliferation, chemotaxis, cation currents, and K(+) currents in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. LPA receptor transduction was analyzed in human and rat RPE cells. METHODS: Cells were cultured with standard methods, and signaling pathways were analyzed with a variety of approaches, including whole-cell recording, calcium imaging, and second-messenger assays. RESULTS: LPA-activated nonselective cation currents in rat RPE were blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein, by the MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059, and by loading cells with antibodies to G(alpha(i)/o/t/z). LPA activated the MAP kinase and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-1, and produced a dose-dependent inhibition of cAMP production. LPA stimulated a dose-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that persisted in Ca(2+)-free medium and was reduced by pretreatment with thapsigargin, suggesting it involves release from intracellular stores. The [Ca(2+)](i) increase was not blocked by ryanodine or the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. LPA did not stimulate inositol phosphate production. Similar to the cation current, LPA-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases were blocked by PD98059 and by loading cells with antibodies to G(alpha(i)/o/t/z). RT-PCR experiments showed the presence of RNA for three LPA receptor subtypes (Edg2, -4, and -7); RNase protection assays showed the strongest expression for Edg2 receptor RNA. CONCLUSIONS: LPA receptors in RPE cells activate pertussis toxin (PTx)-sensitive G proteins that inhibit cAMP accumulation; stimulate MAP kinase which activates a cation current and probably contributes to mitogenesis; and stimulate release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores that appears independent of IP(3) and ryanodine receptor activation.
Authors
Thoreson, WB; Ryan, JS; Shi, C; Kelly, ME; Bryson, EJ; Toews, ML; Ediger, TL; Chacko, DM
MLA Citation
Thoreson, Wallace B., et al. “Lysophosphatidic acid receptor signaling in mammalian retinal pigment epithelial cells.Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 43, no. 7, July 2002, pp. 2450–61.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1451815
PMID
12091450
Source
epmc
Published In
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Volume
43
Published Date
Start Page
2450
End Page
2461

Erratum to: Sensitive Drug-Resistance Assays Reveal Long-Term Persistence of HIV-1 Variants with the K103N Nevirapine (NVP) Resistance Mutation in Some Women and Infants after the Administration of Single-Dose NVP: HIVNET 012.

Authors
Flys, T; Nissley, DV; Claasen, CW; Jones, D; Shi, C; Guay, LA; Musoke, P; Mmiro, F; Strathern, JN; Jackson, JB; Eshleman, JR; Eshleman, SH
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1429382
PMID
31776582
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Infect Dis
Volume
221
Published Date
Start Page
855
DOI
10.1093/infdis/jiz524

Mesenteric tumour deposits arising from small-intestine neuroendocrine tumours are frequently associated with fibrosis and IgG4-expressing plasma cells.

AIMS: Mesenteric tumour deposits frequently occur in small-intestine neuroendocrine tumours. In many instances, these mesenteric tumour deposits are surrounded by a dense fibrotic stroma and have associated lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine whether mesenteric tumour deposits in patients with small-intestine NETs neuroendocrine tumours show histological and immunophenotypic overlap with IgG4-related sclerosing mesenteritis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty-six mesenteric tumour deposits from 66 patients with small-intestine neuroendocrine tumours with blocks available for further studies were identified from our archives. Cases were assessed for clinicopathological features and the presence of IgG4-positive and IgG-positive plasma cells by immunohistochemistry. Ratios of IgG4-positive to IgG-positive plasma cells were calculated. Seventeen mesenteric tumour deposits (26%) showed >40 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field, and the majority of cases (68%) showed at least some staining of IgG4-positive plasma cells. Mesenteric tumour deposits with >20 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field tended to be larger (25.9 ± 13.0 mm versus 18.6 ± 15.8 mm; P = 0.07), and had more IgG-positive plasma cells (88 ± 24 versus 36 ± 37; P < 0.01) and a higher IgG4-positive/IgG-positive plasma cell ratio (0.66 ± 0.18 versus 0.17 ± 0.25; P < 0.01). All but one mesenteric tumour deposit with >20 IgG4-positve plasma cells had a ratio of >40%. CONCLUSIONS: IgG4 expression is frequent in mesenteric tumour deposits from small-intestine neuroendocrine tumours. Undersampling of tumour on biopsies of mesenteric tumour deposits could potentially cause diagnostic confusion with IgG4-related sclerosing mesenteritis.
Authors
Roberts, J; Gonzalez, RS; Revetta, F; Shi, C
MLA Citation
Roberts, Jordan, et al. “Mesenteric tumour deposits arising from small-intestine neuroendocrine tumours are frequently associated with fibrosis and IgG4-expressing plasma cells.Histopathology, vol. 73, no. 5, Nov. 2018, pp. 795–800. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/his.13693.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1429389
PMID
29943407
Source
pubmed
Published In
Histopathology
Volume
73
Published Date
Start Page
795
End Page
800
DOI
10.1111/his.13693

Immune modulator-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract - reply.

Authors
Gonzalez, RS; Salaria, SN; Bohannon, CD; Huber, AR; Feely, MM; Shi, C
MLA Citation
Gonzalez, Raul S., et al. “Immune modulator-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract - reply.Histopathology, vol. 71, no. 3, Sept. 2017, p. 496. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/his.13233.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1429403
PMID
28387954
Source
pubmed
Published In
Histopathology
Volume
71
Published Date
Start Page
496
DOI
10.1111/his.13233

Molecular testing in colorectal cancer

The book does not present molecular methods in isolation, but considers how other evidence (symptoms, radiology or other imaging, or other clinical tests) is used to guide the selection of molecular tests or how these other data are used in ...
Authors
Shi, C; Thomas, JS
MLA Citation
Shi, Chanjuan, and J. S. Thomas. “Molecular testing in colorectal cancer.” Diagnostic Molecular Pathology A Guide to Applied Molecular Testing, edited by W. Coleman and G. Tsongalis, Academic Press, 2016.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1429597
Source
manual
Published Date