Sophia Smith

Overview:

Dr. Sophia Smith is an Associate Professor at the Duke School of Nursing and earned her PhD and MSW degrees at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research explores ways to improve the quality of cancer care including post-treatment survivorship and palliative care with a primary focus on leveraging technology in delivering behavioral health interventions to the community. She is leading efforts to integrate clinical cancer care and research as a means to build the body of scientific evidence that forms the foundation of evidence-based practice through her leadership as Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) Research Director and membership on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Panel and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Survivorship Committee. Dr. Smith’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, NCCN, and Pfizer Grants for Independent Learning and Change.

Positions:

Associate Professor in the School of Nursing

School of Nursing
School of Nursing

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.S.W. 2001

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Ph.D. 2007

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Grants:

Symptom Burden and Quality of Life in Multiple Myeloma Patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Pillars4Life: An Online Self-Management Curriculum for Cancer Survivors

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
Pfizer, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Advanced symptom burden and quality of life in multiple myeloma patients

Administered By
School of Nursing
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Survivorship, Version 1.2021.

The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship are intended to help healthcare professionals working with cancer survivors to ensure that each survivor's complex and varied needs are addressed. The Guidelines provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for consequences of adult-onset cancer and its treatment; recommendations to help promote healthful lifestyle behaviors, weight management, and immunizations in survivors; and a framework for care coordination. This article summarizes the recommendations regarding employment and return to work for cancer survivors that were added in the 2021 version of the NCCN Guidelines.
Authors
Tevaarwerk, A; Denlinger, CS; Sanft, T; Ansbaugh, SM; Armenian, S; Baker, KS; Broderick, G; Day, A; Demark-Wahnefried, W; Dickinson, K; Friedman, DL; Ganz, P; Goldman, M; Henry, NL; Hill-Kayser, C; Hudson, M; Khakpour, N; Koura, D; McDonough, AL; Melisko, M; Mooney, K; Moore, HCF; Moryl, N; Moslehi, JJ; O'Connor, T; Overholser, L; Paskett, ED; Patel, C; Peterson, L; Pirl, W; Rodriguez, MA; Ruddy, KJ; Schapira, L; Shockney, L; Smith, S; Syrjala, KL; Zee, P; McMillian, NR; Freedman-Cass, DA
MLA Citation
Tevaarwerk, Amye, et al. “Survivorship, Version 1.2021.Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : Jnccn, vol. 19, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 676–85. Epmc, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2021.0028.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488066
PMID
34214969
Source
epmc
Published In
Jnccn Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume
19
Published Date
Start Page
676
End Page
685
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2021.0028

Persistent fatigue among long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

This study describes the prevalence and persistence of fatigue among a cohort of long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) survivors. Mailed surveys assessed quality-of-life including fatigue (SF-36) at baseline and five years. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with prevalence of fatigue at baseline and persistence of fatigue across timepoints. More than one-quarter (27.7%) of the 555 NHL survivors reported clinically meaningful fatigue at baseline and 18.7% reported persistent fatigue at five years. One-third (34.4%) reported clinically meaningful worsening of fatigue over time. Independent associations with persistent fatigue included female gender, less education, past chemotherapy, increased comorbidities, and posttraumatic stress symptoms (P <.05). Our findings suggest that one in three NHL survivors experience clinically meaningful fatigue long after their diagnosis and initial treatment. Furthermore, we found that fatigue worsens or persists for many, highlighting the need for vigilance in assessing and treating fatigue in this population.
Authors
LeBlanc, MR; Zimmerman, S; LeBlanc, TW; Bryant, AL; Hudson, KE; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
LeBlanc, Matthew R., et al. “Persistent fatigue among long-term non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.Leuk Lymphoma, Oct. 2021, pp. 1–9. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/10428194.2021.1984450.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498342
PMID
34612771
Source
pubmed
Published In
Leuk Lymphoma
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
9
DOI
10.1080/10428194.2021.1984450

A SMART approach to optimizing delivery of an mHealth intervention among cancer survivors with posttraumatic stress symptoms.

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Many cancer survivors who received intensive treatment such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. PTSD is associated with lower quality of life and other symptoms that require clinical treatment. The iterative treatment decisions that happen in clinical practice are not adequately represented in traditional randomized controlled trials (RCT) of PTSD treatments. The proposed stepped-care SMART design allows for evaluation of initial response to the Cancer Distress Coach mobile app; adaptive stepped-care interventions; and precision treatment strategies that tailor treatment selection to patient characteristics. METHODS/DESIGN: HCT survivors (N = 400) reporting PTSD symptoms are being recruited at two cancer centers and randomly assigned to: 1) Cancer Distress Coach app or 2) Usual Care. The app includes educational and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based activities. Four weeks post-randomization, participants re-rate their PTSD symptoms and, based on intervention response, non-responders are re-randomized to receive video-conferenced sessions with a therapist: 3) coaching sessions in using the mobile app; or 4) CBT specific to HCT survivors. Participants complete outcome measures of PTSD, depression, and anxiety after Months 1, 3, and 6. Participant characteristics moderating intervention responses will be examined. CONCLUSIONS: This novel adaptive trial design will afford evidence that furthers knowledge about optimizing PTSD interventions for HCT survivors. To our knowledge, this study is the first SMART design evaluating PTSD symptom management in cancer survivors. If successful, it could be used to optimize treatment among a range of cancer and other trauma survivors.
Authors
Smith, SK; Somers, TJ; Kuhn, E; Laber, E; Sung, AD; Syrjala, KL; Feger, B; Kelleher, SA; Majestic, C; Gebert, R; LeBlanc, M; Owen, JE; Applebaum, AJ
MLA Citation
Smith, Sophia K., et al. “A SMART approach to optimizing delivery of an mHealth intervention among cancer survivors with posttraumatic stress symptoms.Contemp Clin Trials, vol. 110, Sept. 2021, p. 106569. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cct.2021.106569.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497125
PMID
34536584
Source
pubmed
Published In
Contemp Clin Trials
Volume
110
Published Date
Start Page
106569
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2021.106569

Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors: A population-based study.

<h4>Objective</h4>This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and identified the predictive factors associated with PTSD symptoms in a population of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors.<h4>Methods</h4>A random sample of 2,000 NMIBC survivors, identified through the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, were sent postal mail survey. PTSD symptoms were measured using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple linear regression were used to examine the prevalence of PTSD and to identify the factors associated with PTSD.<h4>Results</h4>A total of 376 participants were included in the analysis. The average PCL-5 score was 7.1 (standard deviation [SD] = 10.9, range: 0-66), where higher scores represent higher levels of PTSD symptoms. The prevalence of the provisional PTSD diagnosis was 5.3% or 6.9% (after adjusting for nonresponse). In addition, 28.7% of participants met criteria for at least one PTSD symptom cluster. After controlling for other variables, participants who were younger, had active disease or unsure of status, had more comorbidities, had lower social support, and had higher cognitive concerns reported significantly higher PTSD symptoms.<h4>Conclusion</h4>More than one-fourth of NMIBC survivors had PTSD symptoms. Thus, healthcare providers should assess PTSD symptoms and provide supportive care for NMIBC survivors in the survivorship phase of care.
Authors
Jung, A; Crandell, JL; Nielsen, ME; Mayer, DK; Smith, SK
MLA Citation
Jung, Ahrang, et al. “Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors: A population-based study.Urologic Oncology, vol. 39, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 237.e7-237.e14. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.11.033.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468860
PMID
33308978
Source
epmc
Published In
Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume
39
Published Date
Start Page
237.e7
End Page
237.e14
DOI
10.1016/j.urolonc.2020.11.033

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Survivorship, Version 2.2020.

The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for consequences of adult-onset cancer and its treatment, with the goal of helping healthcare professionals who work with survivors, including those in primary care. The guidelines also provide recommendations to help clinicians promote physical activity, weight management, and proper immunizations in survivors and facilitate care coordination to ensure that all of the survivors' needs are addressed. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize additions and changes made to the guidelines in 2020 regarding cardiovascular disease risk assessment and screening for subsequent primary malignancies.
Authors
Denlinger, CS; Sanft, T; Moslehi, JJ; Overholser, L; Armenian, S; Baker, KS; Broderick, G; Demark-Wahnefried, W; Friedman, DL; Goldman, M; Henry, NL; Hill-Kayser, C; Hudson, M; Khakpour, N; Koura, D; McDonough, AL; Melisko, M; Mooney, K; Moore, HCF; Moryl, N; O'Connor, T; Paskett, ED; Patel, C; Peterson, L; Pirl, W; Rodriguez, MA; Ruddy, KJ; Shockney, L; Smith, S; Syrjala, KL; Tevaarwerk, A; Zee, P; McMillian, NR; Freedman-Cass, DA
MLA Citation
Denlinger, Crystal S., et al. “NCCN Guidelines Insights: Survivorship, Version 2.2020.Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : Jnccn, vol. 18, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. 1016–23. Epmc, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2020.0037.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453872
PMID
32755975
Source
epmc
Published In
Jnccn Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1016
End Page
1023
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2020.0037

Research Areas:

Cancer
Cancer Survivors
Cancer--Patients
Palliative Care
Palliative treatment
Social Work
Technology--Information services
Telemedicine