Linda Sutton

Overview:

Clinical

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Medical Director, Duke Oncology Consortium

Medicine
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

U Mass Memorial Medical Center

Resident, Internal Medicine

Montefiore Medical Center

Fellowship, Hematology/ Oncology

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

NCI National Clinical Trials Network (UG1)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Improving Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Self-Management Intervention for Women with Breast Cancer and Diabetes

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Caregiver-Assisting Coping Skills Training for Lung Cancer

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Spouse Guided Pain Management Training for Cancer Pain

Administered By
Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Behavioral Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Symptom Management: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Brief Telephone-Delivered Protocol for Patients With Advanced Cancer.

CONTEXT: Patients with advanced cancer face a life-limiting condition that brings a high symptom burden that often includes pain, fatigue, and psychological distress. Psychosocial interventions have promise for managing symptoms but need additional tailoring for these patients' specific needs. Patients with advanced cancer in the community also face persistent barriers-availability of interventions in community clinics as well as financial and illness-related factors-to accessing psychosocial interventions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of telephone implementation of Engage, a novel brief combined Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy protocol, for reducing symptoms and increasing quality of life in community patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Adult patients with advanced cancer receiving care in the community received Engage, four 60-minute manualized telephone sessions delivered by a trained psychotherapist and completed pretreatment and post-treatment assessments. RESULTS: Engage was feasible, achieving 100% accrual (N = 24) of a heterogeneous sample of patients with advanced cancer, with good retention (88% completed). Acceptability was demonstrated via satisfaction (mean 29 of 32; SD 2), engagement (95% attendance), and use of skills. Secondary analyses pointed to reductions in pain interference, fatigue, psychological distress, and improvements in psychological acceptance and engagement in value-guided activity after treatment. CONCLUSION: Engage, our brief novel combined Coping Skills and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy intervention, demonstrated initial feasibility and acceptability when delivered over the telephone and increased access for community clinic patients with advanced cancer. Future research will assess the comparative efficacy of Engage in larger randomized trials.
Authors
Plumb Vilardaga, JC; Winger, JG; Teo, I; Owen, L; Sutton, LM; Keefe, FJ; Somers, TJ
MLA Citation
Plumb Vilardaga, Jennifer C., et al. “Coping Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Symptom Management: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Brief Telephone-Delivered Protocol for Patients With Advanced Cancer..” J Pain Symptom Manage, Sept. 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.09.005.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1411901
PMID
31539599
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Pain Symptom Manage
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.09.005

Randomized Trial of Standard Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens Versus Capecitabine in Older Women With Early Breast Cancer: 10-Year Update of the CALGB 49907 Trial.

PURPOSE: Older women with breast cancer remain under-represented in clinical trials. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B 49907 trial focused on women age 65 years and older. We previously reported the primary analysis after a median follow-up of 2.4 years. Standard adjuvant chemotherapy showed significant improvements in recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival compared with capecitabine. We now update results at a median follow-up of 11.4 years. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients age 65 years or older with early breast cancer were randomly assigned to either standard adjuvant chemotherapy (physician's choice of either cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil or cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin) or capecitabine. An adaptive Bayesian design was used to determine sample size and test noninferiority of capecitabine. The primary end point was RFS. RESULTS: The design stopped accrual with 633 patients at its first sample size assessment. RFS remains significantly longer for patients treated with standard chemotherapy. At 10 years, in patients treated with standard chemotherapy versus capecitabine, the RFS rates were 56% and 50%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; P = .03); breast cancer-specific survival rates were 88% and 82%, respectively (HR, 0.62; P = .03); and overall survival rates were 62% and 56%, respectively (HR, 0.84; P = .16). With longer follow-up, standard chemotherapy remains superior to capecitabine among hormone receptor-negative patients (HR, 0.66; P = .02), but not among hormone receptor-positive patients (HR, 0.89; P = .43). Overall, 43.9% of patients have died (13.1% from breast cancer, 16.4% from causes other than breast cancer, and 14.1% from unknown causes). Second nonbreast cancers occurred in 14.1% of patients. CONCLUSION: With longer follow-up, RFS remains superior for standard adjuvant chemotherapy versus capecitabine, especially in patients with hormone receptor-negative disease. Competing risks in this older population dilute overall survival benefits.
Authors
Muss, HB; Polley, M-YC; Berry, DA; Liu, H; Cirrincione, CT; Theodoulou, M; Mauer, AM; Kornblith, AB; Partridge, AH; Dressler, LG; Cohen, HJ; Kartcheske, PA; Perez, EA; Wolff, AC; Gralow, JR; Burstein, HJ; Mahmood, AA; Sutton, LM; Magrinat, G; Parker, BA; Hart, RD; Grenier, D; Hurria, A; Jatoi, A; Norton, L; Hudis, CA; Winer, EP; Carey, L
MLA Citation
Muss, Hyman B., et al. “Randomized Trial of Standard Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens Versus Capecitabine in Older Women With Early Breast Cancer: 10-Year Update of the CALGB 49907 Trial..” J Clin Oncol, vol. 37, no. 26, Sept. 2019, pp. 2338–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1200/JCO.19.00647.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1402479
PMID
31339827
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
2338
End Page
2348
DOI
10.1200/JCO.19.00647

Palliative care.

These guidelines were developed and updated by an interdisciplinary group of experts based on clinical experience and available scientific evidence. The goal of these guidelines is to help patients with cancer experience the best quality of life possible throughout the illness trajectory by providing guidance for the primary oncology team for symptom screening, assessment, palliative care interventions, reassessment, and afterdeath care. Palliative care should be initiated by the primary oncology team and augmented by collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of palliative care experts.
Authors
Levy, MH; Adolph, MD; Back, A; Block, S; Codada, SN; Dalal, S; Deshields, TL; Dexter, E; Dy, SM; Knight, SJ; Misra, S; Ritchie, CS; Sauer, TM; Smith, T; Spiegel, D; Sutton, L; Taylor, RM; Temel, J; Thomas, J; Tickoo, R; Urba, SG; Von Roenn, JH; Weems, JL; Weinstein, SM; Freedman-Cass, DA; Bergman, MA; NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network),
MLA Citation
Levy, Michael H., et al. “Palliative care..” J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 10, no. 10, Oct. 2012, pp. 1284–309. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2012.0132.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub940638
PMID
23054879
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
10
Published Date
Start Page
1284
End Page
1309
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2012.0132

Quality of life after bone marrow transplantation.

Allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation are performed with increasing frequency for a variety of malignancies as well as certain nonmalignant disorders. Physical toxicities associated with treatment are often substantial. Patients may also experience psychological, social, sexual, and vocational difficulties following treatment, which can have an adverse effect on quality of life. This article reviews selected aspects of physical and psychosocial functioning following allogeneic and autologous transplantation and provides recommendations for future quality of life research in the transplant setting.
Authors
Winer, EP; Sutton, LM
MLA Citation
Winer, E. P., and L. M. Sutton. “Quality of life after bone marrow transplantation..” Oncology (Williston Park), vol. 8, no. 1, Jan. 1994, pp. 19–27.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub801322
PMID
8123445
Source
pubmed
Published In
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
19
End Page
27

Caregiver-assisted coping skills training for lung cancer: results of a randomized clinical trial.

CONTEXT: Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States and is associated with high levels of symptoms, including pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, and psychological distress. Caregivers and patients are adversely affected. However, previous studies of coping skills training (CST) interventions have not been tested in patients with lung cancer nor have systematically included caregivers. OBJECTIVES: This study tested the efficacy of a caregiver-assisted CST protocol in a sample of patients with lung cancer. METHODS: Two hundred thirty-three lung cancer patients and their caregivers were randomly assigned to receive 14 telephone-based sessions of either caregiver-assisted CST or education/support involving the caregiver. Patients completed measures assessing pain, psychological distress, quality of life (QOL), and self-efficacy for symptom management; caregivers completed measures assessing psychological distress, caregiver strain, and self-efficacy for helping the patient manage symptoms. RESULTS: Patients in both treatment conditions showed improvements in pain, depression, QOL, and self-efficacy, and caregivers in both conditions showed improvements in anxiety and self-efficacy from baseline to four-month follow-up. Results of exploratory analyses suggested that the CST intervention was more beneficial to patients/caregivers with Stage II and III cancers, whereas the education/support intervention was more beneficial to patients/caregivers with Stage I cancer. CONCLUSION: Taken together with the broader literature in this area, results from this study suggest that psychosocial interventions can lead to improvements in a range of outcomes for cancer patients. Suggestions for future studies include the use of three-group designs (e.g., comparing two active interventions with a standard-care control) and examining mechanisms of change.
Authors
Porter, LS; Keefe, FJ; Garst, J; Baucom, DH; McBride, CM; McKee, DC; Sutton, L; Carson, K; Knowles, V; Rumble, M; Scipio, C
MLA Citation
Porter, Laura S., et al. “Caregiver-assisted coping skills training for lung cancer: results of a randomized clinical trial..” J Pain Symptom Manage, vol. 41, no. 1, Jan. 2011, pp. 1–13. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2010.04.014.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub779842
PMID
20832982
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Pain Symptom Manage
Volume
41
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
13
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2010.04.014