Kevin Weinfurt

Overview:

Kevin P. Weinfurt, PhD, is Professor and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Population Health Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and a faculty member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute. He holds secondary appointment as a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Professor of  Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, and a Faculty Associate of the Trent Center for the Study of Medical Humanities and Bioethics. Dr. Weinfurt also co-directs the Center for Health Measurement at Duke and is co-director of the Clinical Research Training Program (Masters degree offered through the School of Medicine). Dr. Weinfurt currently works through a contract to the FDA as an expert advisor for the Patient-Focussed Drug Development guidance series. He is also a member of the Secretary's Advisory Committee for Human Research Protections 

Dr. Weinfurt conducts research on measuring patient-reported outcomes, medical decision making, and bioethics. In addition to conducting research, Dr. Weinfurt has taught undergraduate courses in introductory psychology, judgment and decision making, and the psychology of medical decision making; and graduate courses in multivariate statistics, patient-reported outcomes, and research ethics.


Areas of Expertise: Bioethics, Health Measurement, Health Services Research, and Health Behavior

Positions:

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
School of Medicine

Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
School of Medicine

Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Psychology and Neuroscience
Trinity College of Arts & Sciences

Associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Duke Science & Society
Institutes and Provost's Academic Units

Membership of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute

Duke Clinical Research Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 1997

Georgetown University

Grants:

Duke CTSA (KL2)

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Duke CTSA (TL1)

Administered By
Institutes and Centers
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory - Coordinating Center

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory - Coordinating Center

Administered By
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
PD/PI
Start Date
End Date

Stopping Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in CML Patients (Stop-TKIs)

Administered By
Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
Awarded By
Medical College of Wisconsin
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Applying patient-reported outcome methodology to capture patient-reported health data: Report from an NIH Collaboratory roundtable

© 2020 Elsevier Inc. Patient-reported health data provide information for pragmatic clinical trials that may not be readily available from electronic health records or administrative claims data. In this report, we present key considerations for collecting patient-reported health information in pragmatic clinical trials, which are informed by best practices from patient-reported outcome research. We focus on question design and administration via electronic data collection platforms with respect to 3 types of patient-reported health data: medication use, utilization of health care services, and comorbid conditions. We summarize key scientific literature on the accuracy of these patient-reported data compared with electronic health record data. We discuss question design in detail, specifically defining the concept to be measured, patient understanding of the concept, recall periods of the question, and patient willingness to report. In addition, we discuss approaches for question administration and data collection platforms, which are key aspects of successful patient-reported data collection.
Authors
Bennett, AV; Jonsson, M; Chen, RC; Al-Khatib, SM; Weinfurt, KP; Curtis, LH
MLA Citation
Bennett, A. V., et al. “Applying patient-reported outcome methodology to capture patient-reported health data: Report from an NIH Collaboratory roundtable.” Healthcare, vol. 8, no. 3, Sept. 2020. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.hjdsi.2020.100442.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1452366
Source
scopus
Published In
Healthcare (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Volume
8
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.hjdsi.2020.100442

Relationship of symptom severity and bother in individuals seeking care for lower urinary tract symptoms.

AIMS: Bother attributed to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) drives care-seeking and treatment aggressiveness. The longitudinal relationship of LUTS severity and bother in a care-seeking cohort, however, is not well understood. We aim to conduct a longitudinal evaluation of LUTS severity and bother and identify characteristics of patients with discordant LUTS bother relative to severity. METHODS: Men and women with LUTS seeking care at six US tertiary care centers enrolled in the symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction research network study. Patients reporting at least one urinary symptom based on the LUTS Tool were prospectively enrolled from June 2015 to January 2017. Correlations were used to assess the relationship between LUTS severity and bother. Discordance scores (ie, the difference between bother and severity) were used to classify patients with high and low bother. Patients were classified as having high or low bother phenotypes if scores were one standard deviation above or below zero, respectively. Repeated measures multinomial logistic regression evaluated characteristics associated with high and low bother phenotypes. RESULTS: LUTS severity and bother were at least moderately correlated for all symptom items and highly correlated for 13 out of 21 items. Correlations were highest for urgency, and lowest for daytime frequency and urinary incontinence. Odds of being in high bother phenotype were lowest at 3 and 12 months (3 months vs baseline odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, 95% confidence ninterval [CI] = 0.54-0.94; 12 months vs baseline OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.48-0.91), and highest for those who endorsed all urgency questions (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 2.17-6.13). Odds of being in the low bother phenotype were lowest for patients who endorsed all urgency items (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.26-0.42), and all frequency items (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.53-0.88). CONCLUSIONS: LUTS severity and bother correlate highly and measurement of both in clinical practice is likely redundant. There are patient factors associated with discordance which may justify additional evaluation.
Authors
Agochukwu-Mmonu, N; Wiseman, JB; Smith, AR; Helmuth, ME; Sarma, AV; Cameron, AP; Amundsen, CL; Flynn, KE; Cella, D; Weinfurt, KP; Kirkali, Z; Clemens, JQ
MLA Citation
Agochukwu-Mmonu, Nnenaya, et al. “Relationship of symptom severity and bother in individuals seeking care for lower urinary tract symptoms.Neurourol Urodyn, Aug. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/nau.24466.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453819
PMID
32761962
Source
pubmed
Published In
Neurourol Urodyn
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/nau.24466

Patient demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with 30-day recall of self-reported lower urinary tract symptoms

© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC Aims: Measurement of self-reported lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) typically uses a recall period, for example, “In the past 30 days….” Compared to averaged daily reports, 30-day recall is generally unbiased, but recall bias varies by item. We examined the associations between personal characteristics (eg, age, symptom bother) and 30-day recall of LUTS using items from the Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network Comprehensive Assessment of Self-reported Urinary Symptoms questionnaire. Methods: Participants (127 women and 127 men) were recruited from 6 US tertiary care sites. They completed daily assessments for 30 days and a 30-day recall assessment at the end of the study month. For each of the 18 tested items, representing 10 LUTS, the average of the participant's daily responses was modeled as a function of their 30-day recall, the personal characteristic, and the interaction between the 30-day recall and the characteristic in separate general linear regression models, adjusted for sex. Results: Nine items representing 7 LUTS exhibited under- or overreporting (recall bias) for at least 25% of participants. Bias was associated with personal characteristics for six LUTS. Underreporting of incontinence was associated with older age, lower anxiety, and negative affect; overreporting of other LUTS was associated with, symptom bother, symptom variability, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions: We identified under- or overreporting that was associated with personal characteristics for six common LUTS. Some cues (eg, less bother and lower anxiety) were related to recall bias in an unexpected direction. Thus, providers should exercise caution when making judgments about the accuracy of a patient's symptom recall based on patient demographic and psychosocial characteristics.
Authors
Flynn, KE; Mansfield, SA; Smith, AR; Gillespie, BW; Bradley, CS; Cella, D; Helmuth, ME; Lai, HH; Kirkali, Z; Talaty, P; Griffith, JW; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, K. E., et al. “Patient demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with 30-day recall of self-reported lower urinary tract symptoms.” Neurourology and Urodynamics, Jan. 2020. Scopus, doi:10.1002/nau.24461.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1453821
Source
scopus
Published In
Neurourology and Urodynamics
Published Date
DOI
10.1002/nau.24461

Managing different intellectual personalities in scientific teams.

Authors
MLA Citation
Weinfurt, Kevin P. “Managing different intellectual personalities in scientific teams.J Clin Transl Sci, vol. 3, no. 2–3, June 2019, pp. 50–52. Pubmed, doi:10.1017/cts.2019.388.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1417966
PMID
31660228
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
Volume
3
Published Date
Start Page
50
End Page
52
DOI
10.1017/cts.2019.388

Recent sexual function and satisfaction by sexual orientation in US adults

Authors
Flynn, KE; Lin, L; Weinfurt, KP
MLA Citation
Flynn, Kathryn E., et al. “Recent sexual function and satisfaction by sexual orientation in US adults.” Quality of Life Research, vol. 25, SPRINGER, 2016, pp. 52–52.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1250523
Source
wos
Published In
Quality of Life Research
Volume
25
Published Date
Start Page
52
End Page
52