Ken Young

Overview:

I am a clinically-oriented diagnostic physician with clinical expertise in the pathologic diagnosis of hematologic cancers including tumors of the bone marrow, lymphoid tissue, spleen and pre-malignant hematologic conditions. Another area of interest is blood cancer classification with molecular and genetic profiling. In my research program, we focus on molecular mechanisms of tumor progression, cell-of-origin, biomarkers, and novel therapeutic strategies in lymphoma, myeloma and leukemia. In addition to patient care and translational research, medical education and scientific communication are also part of interest. Many residents, fellows, graduates and postdocs have worked and been trained in our program. We perform comprehensive clinical and research functions that include bone marrow, lymphoma pathology, clinical flow cytometry, cytogenetics, molecular diagnostics and outside services.

I am currently the director of hematopathology division that provides diagnostic consultation services and relevant specialized testing for patients with various types of acute and chronic leukemia, lymphoma and benign hematologic disorders. I am specialized in the diagnosis of hematological disorders, including acute and chronic leukemias, myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms, B and T-cell lymphomas, Hodgkin lymphoma, cutaneous and orbital lymphomas and benign bone marrow and lymph node disorders. 

Positions:

Professor of Pathology

Pathology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1984

Zhejiang University (China)

Grants:

Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for B-cell Lymphoma

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for B-cell Lymphoma

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for B-cell Lymphoma

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Treatment-Related Adverse Events of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell (CAR T) in Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Chimeric antigen receptors T (CAR-T) cell therapy of cancer is a rapidly evolving field. It has been shown to be remarkably effective in cases of hematological malignancies, and its approval by the FDA has significantly increased the enthusiasm for wide clinical usage and development of novel CAR-T therapies. However, it has also challenged physicians and investigators to recognize and deal with treatment-associated toxicities. A total of 2592 patients were included from 84 eligible studies that were systematically searched and reviewed from the databases of PubMed, de, the American Society of Hematology and the Cochrane Library. The meta-analysis and subgroup analysis by a Bayesian logistic regression model were used to evaluate the incidences of therapy-related toxicities such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurological symptoms (NS), and the differences between different targets and cancer types were analyzed. The pooled all-grade CRS rate and grade ≥ 3 CRS rate was 77% and 29%, respectively, with a significantly higher incidence in the hematologic malignancies (all-grade: 81%; grade ≥ 3: 29%) than in solid tumors (all-grade: 37%; grade ≥ 3: 19%). The pooled estimate NS rate from the individual studies were 40% for all-grade and 28% for grade ≥ 3. It was also higher in the hematologic subgroup than in the solid tumors group. The subgroup analysis by cancer type showed that higher incidences of grade ≥ 3 CRS were observed in anti-CD19 CAR-T therapy for ALL and NHL, anti-BCMA CAR-T for MM, and anti-CEA CAR-T for solid tumors, which were between 24-36%, while higher incidences of grade ≥ 3 NS were mainly observed in CD19-ALL/NHL (23-37%) and BCMA-MM (12%). Importantly, subgroup analysis on anti-CD19 CAR-T studies showed that young patients (vs. adult patients), allologous T cell origin (vs. autologous origin), gamma retrovirus vector, and higher doses of CAR-T cells were associated with high-grade CRS. On the other hand, the patients with NHL (vs ALL), administered with higher dose of CAR-T, and adult patients (vs. young patients) had an increased incidence of grade ≥ 3 NS events. This study offers a comprehensive summary of treatment-related toxicity and will guide future clinical trials and therapeutic designs investigating CAR T cell therapy.
Authors
Lei, W; Xie, M; Jiang, Q; Xu, N; Li, P; Liang, A; Young, KH; Qian, W
MLA Citation
Lei, Wen, et al. “Treatment-Related Adverse Events of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell (CAR T) in Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.Cancers (Basel), vol. 13, no. 15, Aug. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/cancers13153912.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1492660
PMID
34359816
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancers
Volume
13
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/cancers13153912

Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: Progress in Cell Origin, Molecular Biology, Diagnostic Criteria and Therapeutic Approaches.

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy characterized by recurrent skin nodules, an aggressive clinical course with rapid involvement of hematological organs, and a poor prognosis with poor overall survival. BPDCN is derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and its pathogenesis is unclear. The tumor cells show aberrant expression of CD4, CD56, interleukin-3 receptor alpha chain (CD123), blood dendritic cell antigen 2 (BDCA 2/CD303), blood dendritic cell antigen 4 (BDCA4) and transcription factor (E protein) E2-2 (TCF4). The best treatment drugs are based on experience by adopting those used for either leukemia or lymphoma. Relapse with drug resistance generally occurs quickly. Stem cell transplantation after the first complete remission is recommended and tagraxofusp is the first targeted therapy. In this review, we summarize the differentiation of BPDCN from its cell origin, its connection with normal pDCs, clinical characteristics, genetic mutations and advances in treatment of BPDCN. This review provides insights into the mechanisms of and new therapeutic approaches for BPDCN.
Authors
Cheng, W; Yu, T-T; Tang, A-P; He Young, K; Yu, L
MLA Citation
Cheng, Wei, et al. “Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: Progress in Cell Origin, Molecular Biology, Diagnostic Criteria and Therapeutic Approaches.Curr Med Sci, vol. 41, no. 3, June 2021, pp. 405–19. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11596-021-2393-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1487677
PMID
34218354
Source
pubmed
Published In
Curr Med Sci
Volume
41
Published Date
Start Page
405
End Page
419
DOI
10.1007/s11596-021-2393-3

Vulvar Primary Cutaneous CD8+ Aggressive Epidermotropic Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphoma.

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas may present with a clinical course that is incongruent with the associated histologic findings. Primary cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma classically presents as an abrupt eruption of disseminated ulcerated annular plaques with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis. Herein we describe a vulvar primary cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma with a locally aggressive clinical course that was strikingly responsive to radiation therapy. As aggressive therapy involving systemic chemotherapy is indicated for primary cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma, appropriate clinico-pathologic correlation is crucial for preventing potentially excessive or insufficient therapeutic intervention. Our case also highlights the pivotal role of both radiation therapy and infection control in the management of aggressive cutaneous vulvar lymphomas.
Authors
Morse, DC; Park, KE; Chitsazzadeh, V; Li, S; Young, K; Gunther, JR; Dabaja, BS; Duvic, M
MLA Citation
Morse, Daniel C., et al. “Vulvar Primary Cutaneous CD8+ Aggressive Epidermotropic Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphoma.Int J Gynecol Pathol, vol. 40, no. 3, May 2021, pp. 229–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/PGP.0000000000000648.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476576
PMID
33741766
Source
pubmed
Published In
Int J Gynecol Pathol
Volume
40
Published Date
Start Page
229
End Page
233
DOI
10.1097/PGP.0000000000000648

EZH2 expression is associated with inferior overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma.

Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) which reduces gene expression via trimethylation of a lysine residue of histone 3 (H3K27me3). Expression of EZH2 has not been assessed systematically in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Expression of EZH2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 166 patients with MCL. We also assessed other PRC2 components and H3K27me3. Fifty-seven (38%) of MCL patients were positive for EZH2 using 40% cutoff. EZH2 expression was associated with aggressive histologic variants (65% vs. 29%, p < 0.001), high Ki-67 proliferation rate (median, 72% vs. 19%, p < 0.001), and p53 overexpression (43% vs. 2%, p < 0.001). EZH2 expression did not correlate with expression of other PRC2 components (EED and SUZ12), H3K27me3, MHC-I, and MHC-II. Patients with EZH2 expression (EZH2+) had a poorer overall survival (OS) compared with patients without EZH2 expression (EZH2-) (median OS: 3.9 years versus 9.4 years, respectively, p < 0.001). EZH2 expression also predicted a poorer prognosis in MCL patients with classic histology (median OS, 4.6 years for EZH2+ and 9.6 years for EZH2-negative, respectively, p < 0.001) as well as aggressive histology (median OS, 3.7 years for EZH2+ and 7.9 years for EZH2-negative, respectively, p = 0.046). However, EZH2 expression did not independently correlate with overall survival in a multivariate analysis. Gene expression analysis and pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated a significant enrichment in cell cycle and mitotic transition pathways in MCL with EZH2 expression. EZH2 expression detected by immunohistochemistry is present in 38% of MCL cases and it is associated with high proliferation rate, p53 overexpression, aggressive histologic variants, and poorer OS. Based on gene expression profiling data, EZH2 expression could potentiate cell cycle machinery in MCL. These data suggest that assessment of EZH2 expression could be useful to stratify MCL patients into low- and high-risk groups.
Authors
Martinez-Baquero, D; Sakhdari, A; Mo, H; Kim, DH; Kanagal-Shamanna, R; Li, S; Young, KH; O'Malley, DP; Dogan, A; Jain, P; Wang, ML; McDonnell, TJ; Miranda, RN; Vega, F; Medeiros, LJ; Ok, CY
MLA Citation
Martinez-Baquero, Diana, et al. “EZH2 expression is associated with inferior overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma.Mod Pathol, vol. 34, no. 12, Dec. 2021, pp. 2183–91. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41379-021-00885-9.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1494124
PMID
34376807
Source
pubmed
Published In
Modern Pathology
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
2183
End Page
2191
DOI
10.1038/s41379-021-00885-9

EBV-positive high-grade B-cell lymphoma with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 rearrangements: a multi-institutional study.

AIMS: It is unknown whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection can occur in high-grade B-cell lymphoma with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 rearrangements, also known as double-hit or triple-hit lymphoma (DHL/THL). METHODS AND RESULTS: Here we report 16 cases of EBV+ DHL/THL from screening 846 cases of DHL/THL and obtaining additional EBV+ cases through multi-institutional collaboration: 8 MYC/BCL2 DHL, 6 MYC/BCL6 DHL, and 2 THL. There were 8 men and 8 women with a median age of 65 years (range, 32-86). Two patients had a history of follicular lymphoma and one had AIDS. Nine of 14 patients had an International Prognostic Index of ≥3. Half of the cases showed high-grade/Burkitt-like morphology and the other half diffuse large B-cell lymphoma morphology. By immunohistochemistry, the lymphoma cells were positive for MYC (n=14/16), BCL2 (n=12/16), BCL6 (n=14/16), CD10 (n=13/16), and MUM1 (n=6/14). By Hans algorithm, 13 cases were classified as GCB and 3 as non-GCB. The lymphomas frequently showed an EBV latency type I with a median EBV-encoded small RNAs of 80% positive cells (range, 20-100%). After a median follow-up of 36.3 months (range, 2.0-41.6), 7 patients died with a median survival of 15.4 months (range, 3.4-47.3) after diagnosis of EBV+ DHL/THL. Five of 6 patients with MYC/BCL6 DHL were alive including 4 in complete remission. In contrast, only 4/10 patients with MYC/BCL2 DHL or THL were alive including 2 in complete remission. The median survival in patients with MYC/BCL6 DHL was unreached and was 21.6 months in patients with MYC/BCL2 DHL or THL. CONCLUSIONS: EBV infection in DHL/THL is rare (~1.5%). Cases of EBV+ DHL/THL are largely similar to their EBV-negative counterparts clinicopathologically. Our findings expand the spectrum of EBV+ B-cell lymphomas currently recognized in the WHO classification and suggest differences between EBV+ MYC/BCL2 and MYC/BCL6 DHL that may have therapeutic implications.
Authors
Liu, H; Xu-Monette, ZY; Tang, G; Wang, W; Kim, Y; Yuan, J; Li, Y; Chen, W; Li, Y; Fedoriw, GY; Zhu, F; Fang, X; Luedke, C; Medeiros, LJ; Young, KH; Hu, S
MLA Citation
Liu, Hui, et al. “EBV-positive high-grade B-cell lymphoma with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 rearrangements: a multi-institutional study.Histopathology, Oct. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.1111/his.14585.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498836
PMID
34637146
Source
pubmed
Published In
Histopathology
Published Date
DOI
10.1111/his.14585

Research Areas:

Biomarkers, Pharmacological
Genetic Association Studies
Leukemia
Lymphoblastic leukemia
Lymphoma
Multiple Myeloma