Tian Zhang

Positions:

Associate Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2009

Harvard Medical School

M.H.S. 2019

Duke University School of Medicine

Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Fellowship in Hematology-Oncology, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Defining the Relevant Immune Checkpoints Expressed on Metastatic Prostate Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Janssen Research & Development, LLC
Role
Statistician
Start Date
End Date

Conditional lethality of copper and disulfiram as a therapeutic modality for prostate cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) as Monotherapy in the Adjuvant Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma Post Nephrectomy (KEYNOTE-564)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merck
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Salvage Trial of AR Inhibition with ADT and Apalutamide with Docetaxel followed by Radiation Therapy in Men with PSA Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy (¿STARTAR¿)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Janssen Pharmaceutica, Inc.
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

MM-310-01-01-01: A Phase 1 Study Evaluating the Safety, Pharmacology and Preliminary Activity of MM-310 in Patients with Solid Tumors

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Merrimack Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

A prospective trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in Black and White men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

BACKGROUND: Retrospective analyses of randomized trials suggest that Black men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have longer survival than White men. The authors conducted a prospective study of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone to explore outcomes by race. METHODS: This race-stratified, multicenter study estimated radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) in Black and White men with mCRPC. Secondary end points included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, overall survival (OS), and safety. Exploratory analysis included genome-wide genotyping to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with progression in a model incorporating genetic ancestry. One hundred patients self-identified as White (n = 50) or Black (n = 50) were enrolled. Eligibility criteria were modified to facilitate the enrollment of individual Black patients. RESULTS: The median rPFS for Black and White patients was 16.6 and 16.8 months, respectively; their times to PSA progression (TTP) were 16.6 and 11.5 months, respectively; and their OS was 35.9 and 35.7 months, respectively. Estimated rates of PSA decline by ≥50% in Black and White patients were 74% and 66%, respectively; and PSA declines to <0.2 ng/mL were 26% and 10%, respectively. Rates of grade 3 and 4 hypertension, hypokalemia, and hyperglycemia were higher in Black men. CONCLUSIONS: Multicenter prospective studies by race are feasible in men with mCRPC but require less restrictive eligibility. Despite higher comorbidity rates, Black patients demonstrated rPFS and OS similar to those of White patients and trended toward greater TTP and PSA declines, consistent with retrospective reports. Importantly, Black men may have higher side-effect rates than White men. This exploratory genome-wide analysis of TTP identified a possible candidate marker of ancestry-dependent treatment outcomes.
Authors
George, DJ; Halabi, S; Heath, EI; Sartor, AO; Sonpavde, GP; Das, D; Bitting, RL; Berry, W; Healy, P; Anand, M; Winters, C; Riggan, C; Kephart, J; Wilder, R; Shobe, K; Rasmussen, J; Milowsky, MI; Fleming, MT; Bearden, J; Goodman, M; Zhang, T; Harrison, MR; McNamara, M; Zhang, D; LaCroix, BL; Kittles, RA; Patierno, BM; Sibley, AB; Patierno, SR; Owzar, K; Hyslop, T; Freedman, JA; Armstrong, AJ
MLA Citation
George, Daniel J., et al. “A prospective trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in Black and White men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.Cancer, vol. 127, no. 16, Aug. 2021, pp. 2954–65. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/cncr.33589.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1481831
PMID
33951180
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer
Volume
127
Published Date
Start Page
2954
End Page
2965
DOI
10.1002/cncr.33589

Immunotherapy and targeted-therapy combinations mark a new era of kidney cancer treatment.

Authors
MLA Citation
Zhang, Tian, and Daniel J. George. “Immunotherapy and targeted-therapy combinations mark a new era of kidney cancer treatment.Nat Med, vol. 27, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 586–88. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41591-021-01320-x.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1478277
PMID
33820997
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nat Med
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
586
End Page
588
DOI
10.1038/s41591-021-01320-x

Abstract 6439: CapioCyte™ technology for efficient capture and downstream analysis of circulating tumor cells from renal cell carcinoma

Authors
Bu, J; Poellmann, MJ; Reyes-Martinez, M; Armstrong, A; George, D; Zhang, T; Wang, AZ; hong, S
MLA Citation
Bu, Jiyoon, et al. “Abstract 6439: CapioCyte™ technology for efficient capture and downstream analysis of circulating tumor cells from renal cell carcinoma.” Clinical Trials, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7445.am2020-6439.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475820
Source
crossref
Published In
Clinical Trials
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7445.am2020-6439

CLINICAL TRIALS IN PROGRESS

MLA Citation
Zhang, Tian, and Andrew Armstrong. “CLINICAL TRIALS IN PROGRESS.” Oncology New York, vol. 34, no. 8, Aug. 2020, pp. 304–304.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1473892
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume
34
Published Date
Start Page
304
End Page
304

COVID-19 vaccines for patients with cancer: benefits likely outweigh risks.

Less than a year since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, ten vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have been approved for at least limited use, with over sixty others in clinical trials. This swift achievement has generated excitement and arrives at a time of great need, as the number of COVID-19 cases worldwide continues to rapidly increase. Two vaccines are currently approved for full use, both built on mRNA and lipid nanotechnology platforms, a success story of mRNA technology 20 years in the making. For patients with cancer, questions arise around the safety and efficacy of these vaccines in the setting of immune alterations engendered by their malignancy and/or therapies. We summarize the current data on leading COVID-19 vaccine candidates and vaccination of patients undergoing immunomodulatory cancer treatments. Most current cancer therapeutics should not prevent the generation of protective immunity. We call for more research in this area and recommend that the majority of patients with cancer receive COVID vaccinations when possible.
Authors
MLA Citation
Hwang, Joyce K., et al. “COVID-19 vaccines for patients with cancer: benefits likely outweigh risks.J Hematol Oncol, vol. 14, no. 1, Feb. 2021, p. 38. Pubmed, doi:10.1186/s13045-021-01046-w.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1475648
PMID
33640005
Source
pubmed
Published In
Journal of Hematology & Oncology
Volume
14
Published Date
Start Page
38
DOI
10.1186/s13045-021-01046-w