Mindfulness Training for Smokers

The Quit at Duke program is able to offer its patients Mindfulness Training for Smokers, a no cost eight-week interactive course designed to teach skills to quit tobacco use including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, cigars, e-cigarettes and all Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems. 

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Patient and Doctor Talking

Course Description

Mindfulness is a mental skill that involves stopping habits by paying attention to your present experience. The core of the Mindfulness Training for Smokers intervention is participating in a group led by clinical social workers Megan Keith and Andrea Pratt once a week, meditating once a day and doing other mindfulness practices like mindful smoking and walking.

Participants will learn how to use mindfulness practices to manage:

  • smoking triggers
  • smoking urges
  • withdrawal symptoms
  • stressful situations
  • strong emotions
  • addictive thoughts
  • automatic behaviors 

Location

Mindfulness Training for Smokers is currently being offered virtually through the Zoom Videoconference platform.

Schedule

Mindfulness Training for Smokers (MTS) is offered on Tuesday evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., or Wednesday afternoons from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. for eight consecutive weeks. A new round of groups start every other month. Participants may join during the first or second week of group. 

MTS is available to Quit at Duke patients. If you are not currently a Quit at Duke patient, ask your medical provider for a referral or call 919-613-QUIT (7848). You will receive an email with more details and a link to select the group that best fits your schedule.

Cost

Mindfulness Training for Smokers, is free for Quit at Duke patients. The expenses for this group have been provided through a gift in memory of Elizabeth Jones.

Success Rates

Mindfulness Training for Smokers (MTS) was designed specifically to help people who smoke when other treatments have not been effective in the past. When compared with other behavioral programs, MTS is nearly twice as successful.1