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We invite you to share your story to help raise awareness. If you have been or are being treated for cancer at Duke or if you are a caregiver, we'd like to know how cancer care, research or clinical trials at Duke has affected your life. Are you a donor? If so, please consider sharing you story. Tell us why you choose to team up with Duke Cancer Institute. For more information or to share your story, please contact Sara Wajda, Director of Annual Giving, DCI Development.

What Does Heart Disease Have To Do With Cancer?

In 2017, Chiara Melloni, MD, a cardiologist and researcher at Duke Clinical Research Institute, and colleagues published results of one of the first studies to look at management of patients with both cancer and atrial fibrillation (a type of irregular heartbeat). The study may not have happened if...

The Toxic Cost Of Cancer

FUMIKO CHINO, MD , a resident in radiation oncology, last summer co-authored research showing that the high cost of cancer care is a serious problem for many patients. But for Chino, this problem—“financial toxicity”—is more than just academic. In 2005, she was engaged to be married and was working...

DCI Authorized To Offer Commercial CAR-T Cell Therapy

In January 2018, Duke Cancer Institute joined a select group of medical centers authorized to offer a new type of immunotherapy for patients with certain types of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Duke is currently one of two centers in the Carolinas and Virginia that are certified and...

#MyDukeCancerStory: Passion for Bacteria Eradication Drives Cancer Researcher

Meira Epplein, PhD, MS, MA, can hardly recall a time when she wasn’t thinking about what she now considers her “life’s work” — researching Helicobacter pylori , the primary identified cause of stomach cancer. The path to getting there, she says, “was a bit unusual.” A co-leader for Duke Cancer...

#MyDukeCancerStory: Research Coordinator Learns Resilience

Hoofing it up the steps and zipping through the halls across Duke’s medical campus, Crystal Cates, MS, CCRP, is a clinical research coordinator on a mission. On any given day one can find her on her way to collect specimens in the operating room, back to the lab to process them or off to see...

Rare and Dangerous

It doesn't look or act like most breast cancers. But inflammatory breast cancer may just hold the secret to understanding what happens when any breast cancer turns deadly. When you think of breast cancer, you probably picture a telltale lump. Gayathri Devi, PhD, dispels that image with a few photos...

Fighting the Resistance

Why do perfectly good cancer treatments suddenly stop working? Researcher and lymphoma survivor Kris Wood is finding answers. Kris Wood, PhD, had been going full tilt for more than six months, ever since he’d been hired to the faculty in the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke. He...

Escaping the Cancer Care Black Hole

People diagnosed with cancer enter a period of intense treatment at a cancer center, and it can seem to their primary care physicians that they have disappeared. The patient’s overall health can suffer as a result. Duke’s new Center for Onco-Primary Care aims to change that. At age 49, Stacey...

Physician-Scientist Looks To Environment For Clues To Bladder Cancer

Matt Vitale, a computer lab engineer for Dell Inc., was only 42 years old when he was diagnosed in 2004 with bladder cancer; the fourth most common cancer in men but a cancer that predominantly affects people in their ‘60s and ‘70s. Then a weight trainer and amateur pilot, Vitale, who for the next...

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