Peter Allen

Positions:

Professor of Surgery

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology

Surgical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.A. 1989

Harvard University

M.D. 1993

Dartmouth College, Geisel School of Medicine

Surgical Intern, Surgery

Walter Reed Army Medical Center

Surgical Resident, Surgery

Walter Reed Army Medical Center

Research Fellow

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Surgical Oncology Fellow, Surgery

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Grants:

Biomarker validation for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Preventing an Incurable Disease: The Prevention of Progression to Pancreatic Cancer Trial (The 3P-C Trial)

Administered By
Surgical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Detection and Prognosis of Early-stage Pancreatic Cancer by Interdependent Plasma Markers

Administered By
Surgical Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Preventing an Incurable Disease: The Prevention of Progression to Pancreatic Cancer Trial (The 3P-C Trial)

Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Detection and Prognosis of Early-stage Pancreatic Cancer by Interdependent Plasma Markers

Administered By
Surgical Oncology
Awarded By
Van Andel Research Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

ASO Author Reflections: Spatial Immunophenotyping of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm.

Authors
Eckhoff, A; Allen, PJ
MLA Citation
Eckhoff, Austin, and Peter J. Allen. “ASO Author Reflections: Spatial Immunophenotyping of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm.Ann Surg Oncol, July 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-022-12178-9.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1530172
PMID
35835928
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-022-12178-9

Multidimensional Immunophenotyping of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Reveals Novel T Cell and Macrophage Signature.

BACKGROUND: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are the only radiographically identifiable precursor to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, yet little is known about how these lesions progress to cancer. Inflammation has been associated with dysplastic progression; however, the cause and composition of this inflammation remains poorly characterized. We sought to comprehensively profile immune cell infiltration using parallel spatial transcriptomic and flow cytometric techniques. METHODS: Twelve patients with resected IPMN exhibiting both high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and low-grade dysplasia (LGD) were selected for spatial transcriptomics (NanoString GeoMx). Immune (CD45+), epithelial (PanCK+), and stromal (SMA+) compartments were analyzed separately using the GeoMx NGS Pipeline. An additional 11 patients resected for IPMN of varying degrees of dysplasia underwent immunophenotyping using flow cytometry (DURAClone IM). RESULTS: Spatial transcriptomics revealed that T cells represent the dominant immune cell within IPMN stroma, which was confirmed by flow cytometry (56%). Spatial profiling found that the T-cell infiltrate was significantly higher in regions of LGD compared with HGD (62% vs. 50%, p = 0.038). Macrophages were the only other immune cell type with > 10% abundance, yet conversely, were generally more abundant in regions of HGD compared to LGD (19% vs. 11%, p = 0.058). Correspondingly, immune cells within regions of HGD demonstrated transcriptional upregulation of genes associated with macrophage activity including secretion (CXCL1) and phagocytosis (C1QA, C1S, C4B). CONCLUSIONS: IPMN immune infiltrate is primarily composed of T cells and macrophages. Regions of HGD appear to be relatively deplete of T cells and show a trend toward macrophage enrichment compared with regions of LGD.
Authors
Eckhoff, AM; Fletcher, AA; Landa, K; Iyer, M; Nussbaum, DP; Shi, C; Nair, SK; Allen, PJ
MLA Citation
Eckhoff, Austin M., et al. “Multidimensional Immunophenotyping of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Reveals Novel T Cell and Macrophage Signature.Ann Surg Oncol, 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1245/s10434-022-12157-0.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1521716
PMID
35831529
Source
pubmed
Published In
Annals of Surgical Oncology
Published Date
DOI
10.1245/s10434-022-12157-0

The diagnosis and management of cystic lesions of the pancreas.

Cystic lesions of the pancreas are radiographic findings that have a very broad histologic differential. This differential spans the spectrum from benign to cancerous, and includes non-neoplastic pseudocysts, benign neoplastic cysts, pre-malignant cysts, and cystic lesions with invasive carcinoma. This chapter will highlight the challenges with diagnosis and management of patients who present with cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.
Authors
Allen, PJ
MLA Citation
Allen, Peter J. “The diagnosis and management of cystic lesions of the pancreas.Chin Clin Oncol, vol. 6, no. 6, Dec. 2017, p. 60. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/cco.2017.12.05.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1436118
PMID
29307200
Source
pubmed
Published In
Chin Clin Oncol
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
60
DOI
10.21037/cco.2017.12.05

Anatomy of the pancreas and biliary tree

Authors
Zambirinis, CP; Allen, PJ
MLA Citation
Zambirinis, C. P., and P. J. Allen. “Anatomy of the pancreas and biliary tree.” Surgical Diseases of the Pancreas and Biliary Tree, 2018, pp. 1–26. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-981-10-8755-4_1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432488
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
1
End Page
26
DOI
10.1007/978-981-10-8755-4_1

Is Hepatectomy Justified for BRAF Mutant Colorectal Liver Metastases?: A Multi-institutional Analysis of 1497 Patients.

OBJECTIVE: To analyze clinical outcomes and prognostic variables of patients undergoing hepatic resection for BRAF mutant (BRAF-mut) colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). BACKGROUND: Outcomes following hepatectomy for BRAF-mut CRLM have not been well studied. METHODS: All patients who underwent hepatectomy for CRLM with complete resection and known BRAF status during 2001 to 2016 at 3 high-volume centers were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 4124 patients who underwent hepatectomy for CRLM, 1497 had complete resection and known BRAF status. Thirty-five (2%) patients were BRAF-mut, with 71% of V600E mutation. Compared with BRAF wild-type (BRAF-wt), BRAF-mut patients were older, more commonly presented with higher ASA scores, synchronous, multiple and smaller CRLM, underwent more major hepatectomies, but had less extrahepatic disease. Median overall survival (OS) was 81 months for BRAF-wt and 40 months for BRAF-mut patients (P < 0.001). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 22 and 10 months for BRAF-wt and BRAF-mut patients (P < 0.001). For BRAF-mut, factors associated with worse OS were node-positive primary tumor, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) >200 μg/L, and clinical risk score (CRS) ≥4. Factors associated with worse RFS were node-positive primary tumor, ≥4 CRLM, and positive hepatic margin. V600E mutations were not associated with worse OS or RFS. A case-control matching analysis on prognostic clinicopathologic factors confirmed shorter OS (P < 0.001) and RFS (P < 0.001) in BRAF-mut. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with resectable BRAF-mut CRLM are rare among patients selected for surgery and more commonly present with multiple synchronous tumors. BRAF mutation is associated with worse prognosis; however, long-term survival is possible and associated with node-negative primary tumors, CEA ≤ 200 μg/L and CRS < 4.
Authors
Gagnière, J; Dupré, A; Gholami, SS; Pezet, D; Boerner, T; Gönen, M; Kingham, TP; Allen, PJ; Balachandran, VP; De Matteo, RP; Drebin, JA; Yaeger, R; Kemeny, NE; Jarnagin, WR; D'Angelica, MI
MLA Citation
Gagnière, Johan, et al. “Is Hepatectomy Justified for BRAF Mutant Colorectal Liver Metastases?: A Multi-institutional Analysis of 1497 Patients.Ann Surg, vol. 271, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 147–54. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/SLA.0000000000002968.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1427003
PMID
29995686
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Surg
Volume
271
Published Date
Start Page
147
End Page
154
DOI
10.1097/SLA.0000000000002968