Nancy Andrews

Positions:

Nanaline H. Duke Distinguished Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Dean Emerita of the School of Medicine

School of Medicine
School of Medicine

Professor of Pediatrics

Pediatrics
School of Medicine

Professor of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology

Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

B.S. 1980

Yale University

M.S. 1980

Yale University

Ph.D. 1985

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

M.D. 1987

Harvard University

Grants:

Bridging the Gap to Enhance Clinical Research Program (BIGGER)

Administered By
Medicine, Infectious Diseases
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Advisor
Start Date
End Date

School of Medicine 2017 Biddle

Administered By
School of Medicine
Awarded By
Mary Duke Biddle Foundation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Expansion of Animal Resources for Large Animals (Vivarium Expansion project)

Administered By
School of Medicine
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genes that modify Iron loading in mice

Administered By
Pharmacology & Cancer Biology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Identification of Novel Genes That Modulate Systemic Iron Homeostasis

Administered By
Pathology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Mentor
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Control of Systemic Iron Homeostasis by the 3' Iron-Responsive Element of Divalent Metal Transporter 1 in Mice.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text.
Authors
Tybl, E; Gunshin, H; Gupta, S; Barrientos, T; Bonadonna, M; Celma Nos, F; Palais, G; Karim, Z; Sanchez, M; Andrews, NC; Galy, B
MLA Citation
Tybl, Elisabeth, et al. “Control of Systemic Iron Homeostasis by the 3' Iron-Responsive Element of Divalent Metal Transporter 1 in Mice.Hemasphere, vol. 4, no. 5, Oct. 2020, p. e459. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/HS9.0000000000000459.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1462906
PMID
33062942
Source
pubmed
Published In
Hemasphere
Volume
4
Published Date
Start Page
e459
DOI
10.1097/HS9.0000000000000459

Voices: The Future of Metabolism.

While reflecting upon the past five years of metabolic research, we asked leaders in the field what they envisioned the next five will hold and what challenges must be overcome. Here is an inspiring look onward to 2025, from leveraging technology and collaborations to advancing therapeutics and augmenting healthspan.
MLA Citation
Voices: The Future of Metabolism.Cell Metab, vol. 31, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 3–5. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2019.12.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1468352
PMID
31951567
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cell Metab
Volume
31
Published Date
Start Page
3
End Page
5
DOI
10.1016/j.cmet.2019.12.011

The molecular basis of iron metabolism

Iron’s primary role in mammalian biology is to bind oxygen in hemoglobin and myoglobin, and to catalyze the enzymatic transfer of electrons by iron-dependent enzymes, including cytochromes, peroxidases, ribonucleotide reductases, and catalases. All known disorders of iron metabolism can be considered abnormalities of iron balance. On the cellular and molecular levels, hepcidin inhibits the efflux of cellular iron into extracellular fluid or plasma, exerting its effect on the major cell types involved in iron transport: enterocytes, macrophages, hepatocytes, and placental syncytiotrophoblast. The hypoferremic effect of hepcidin is due to its ability to inhibit the major mechanisms that deliver iron to plasma: intestinal iron absorption and the release of iron from recycling compartments and stores in the spleen and the liver. Iron homeostasis requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport and iron storage so that tissues will have adequate amounts to meet their needs, but will not become overloaded with iron.
Authors
Andrews, NC; Ganz, T
MLA Citation
Andrews, N. C., and T. Ganz. “The molecular basis of iron metabolism.” Molecular Hematology, 2019, pp. 161–72. Scopus, doi:10.1002/9781119252863.ch13.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1476724
Source
scopus
Published Date
Start Page
161
End Page
172
DOI
10.1002/9781119252863.ch13

Disorders of iron metabolism.

Authors
Green, R
MLA Citation
Green, R. “Disorders of iron metabolism.N Engl J Med, vol. 342, no. 17, Apr. 2000, p. 1293.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463820
PMID
10787337
Source
pubmed
Published In
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume
342
Published Date
Start Page
1293

Transferrin

Authors
MLA Citation
Andrews, Nancy C. Transferrin. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Crossref, doi:10.1002/0471203076.emm1164.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1463817
Source
crossref
DOI
10.1002/0471203076.emm1164