Nadine Barrett

Overview:

As a Medical Sociologist with over 15 years of experience engaging diverse health systems and communities to improve community and population health, I have devoted my career to reducing health disparities among disadvantaged and vulnerable populations and effectively training health care and research professionals and trainees in community engagement, diversity and inclusion, and the principles of authentic and impactful stakeholder collaborations. My expertise can be defined broadly within the context of developing effective community and health system partnerships to improve health outcomes, and conducting community health assessments to inform strategic priority setting, and program development, implementation and evaluation. I serve as the inaugural director of the Office of Health Equity and Disparities at the Duke Cancer Institute, and the Director of the Community Connections and Collaborations Core within the Duke CTSA and the Center for Community and Population Health Improvement. I am also faculty in the Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Community Health. 
I have several funded project including Project PLACE (Population Level Approaches to Cancer Elimination), funded by the NCI is a three pronged research project designed to implement three robust mechanisms to inform the health equity strategic direction of the DCI over the next 5- 8 years. Project PLACE  is a highly intensive community engagement model and platform designed to shape robust scholarly productivity, partnered research and community programs to improve population health. I am also the Duke PI (subcontract) with Kevin Williams (lead-PI)of a national Susan G. Komen pipeline training grant on translational research in Inflammatory Breast Cancer, and community engaged research. I also co-direct the NCI funded Cancer Research and Education Program Core of the NCCU/DCI Translational Health Disparities Research Program which incorporates specified training in minority accrual in clinical research, a program I developed within the DCI entitled, Just Ask.  

Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2005

Texas Womans University

Grants:

Just Ask - Increasing Diversity in Oncology Clinical Research and Trials An Institutional and Stakeholder Engagement Approach

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Initiative

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Breast Cancer Awareness to Action Ambassador Program (BCAAAP)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Effect of Cultural, Folk, and Religious Beliefs and Practices on Delays in Diagnosis of Ovarian Cancer in African American Women.

BACKGROUND: Certain cultural, folk, and religious beliefs that are more common among African Americans (AAs) have been associated with later-stage breast cancer. It is unknown if these beliefs are similarly associated with delays in diagnosis of ovarian cancer. METHODS: Data from a multicenter case-control study of ovarian cancer in AA women were used to examine associations between cultural/folk beliefs and religious practices and stage at diagnosis and symptom duration before diagnosis. Associations between cultural/folk beliefs or religious practices and stage at diagnosis were assessed with logistic regression analyses, and associations with symptom duration with linear regression analyses. RESULTS: Agreement with several of the cultural/folk belief statements was high (e.g., 40% agreed that "if a person prays about cancer, God will heal it without medical treatments"), and ∼90% of women expressed moderate to high levels of religiosity/spirituality. Higher levels of religiosity/spirituality were associated with a twofold increase in the odds of stage III-IV ovarian cancer, whereas agreement with the cultural/folk belief statements was not associated with stage. Symptom duration before diagnosis was not consistently associated with cultural/folk beliefs or religiosity/spirituality. CONCLUSIONS: Women who reported stronger religious beliefs or practices had increased odds of higher stage ovarian cancer. Inaccurate cultural/folk beliefs about cancer treament were not associated with stage; however, these beliefs were highly prevalent in our population and could impact patient treatment decisions. Our findings suggest opportunities for health education interventions, especially working with churches, and improved doctor-patient communication.
Authors
Moorman, PG; Barrett, NJ; Wang, F; Alberg, JA; Bandera, EV; Barnholtz-Sloan, JB; Bondy, M; Cote, ML; Funkhouser, E; Kelemen, LE; Peres, LC; Peters, ES; Schwartz, AG; Terry, PD; Crankshaw, S; Abbott, SE; Schildkraut, JM
MLA Citation
Moorman, Patricia G., et al. “Effect of Cultural, Folk, and Religious Beliefs and Practices on Delays in Diagnosis of Ovarian Cancer in African American Women..” J Womens Health (Larchmt), vol. 28, no. 4, Apr. 2019, pp. 444–51. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/jwh.2018.7031.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1358565
PMID
30481095
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Womens Health (Larchmt)
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
444
End Page
451
DOI
10.1089/jwh.2018.7031

Testing a behavioral intervention to improve adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET).

Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) is used to prevent recurrence and reduce mortality for women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Poor adherence to AET is a significant problem and contributes to increased medical costs and mortality. A variety of problematic symptoms associated with AET are related to non-adherence and early discontinuation of treatment. The goal of this study is to test a novel, telephone-based coping skills training that teaches patients adherence skills and techniques for coping with problematic symptoms (CST-AET). Adherence to AET will be assessed in real-time for 18 months using wireless smart pill bottles. Symptom interference (i.e., pain, vasomotor symptoms, sleep problems, vaginal dryness) and cost-effectiveness of the intervention protocol will be examined as secondary outcomes. Participants (N = 400) will be recruited from a tertiary care medical center or community clinics in medically underserved or rural areas. Participants will be randomized to receive CST-AET or a general health education intervention (comparison condition). CST-AET includes ten nurse-delivered calls delivered over 6 months. CST-AET provides systematic training in coping skills for managing symptoms that interfere with adherence. Interactive voice messaging provides reinforcement for skills use and adherence that is tailored based on real-time adherence data from the wireless smart pill bottles. Given the high rates of non-adherence and recent recommendations that women remain on AET for 10 years, we describe a timely trial. If effective, the CST-AET protocol may not only reduce the burden of AET use but also lead to cost-effective changes in clinical care and improve breast cancer outcomes. Trials registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02707471, registered 3/3/2016.
Authors
Shelby, RA; Dorfman, CS; Bosworth, HB; Keefe, F; Sutton, L; Owen, L; Corsino, L; Erkanli, A; Reed, SD; Arthur, SS; Somers, T; Barrett, N; Huettel, S; Gonzalez, JM; Kimmick, G
MLA Citation
Shelby, Rebecca A., et al. “Testing a behavioral intervention to improve adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET)..” Contemp Clin Trials, vol. 76, Jan. 2019, pp. 120–31. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cct.2018.11.010.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1358102
PMID
30472215
Source
pubmed
Published In
Contemp Clin Trials
Volume
76
Published Date
Start Page
120
End Page
131
DOI
10.1016/j.cct.2018.11.010

Developing effective community and health system partnerships to advance health equity and health disparities research.

Authors
Barrett, N; Ingraham, K; Williams, K; Lin, P-H; Eisenson, H; Chirinos, M; Harvey, D; Patierno, S
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine, et al. “Developing effective community and health system partnerships to advance health equity and health disparities research..” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 27, no. 7, AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2018, pp. 34–34.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1333241
Source
wos
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
34
End Page
34

Attitudes, perceptions, and strategies toward increasing cancer screening, treatment, and participation in research among Latinos.

Authors
Barrett, NJ; Ingraham, KL; Boyce, X; Reyes, R
MLA Citation
Barrett, Nadine J., et al. “Attitudes, perceptions, and strategies toward increasing cancer screening, treatment, and participation in research among Latinos..” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, vol. 27, no. 7, AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2018, pp. 115–115.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1333287
Source
wos
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
115
End Page
115

Connecting Mentally Ill Detainees in Large Urban Jails with Community Care.

Large urban jails have become a collection point for many persons with severe mental illness. Connections between jail and community mental health services are needed to assure in-jail care and to promote successful community living following release. This paper addresses this issue for 2855 individuals with severe mental illness who received community mental health services prior to jail detention in King County (Seattle), Washington over a 5-year time period using a unique linked administrative data source. Logistic regression was used to determine the probability that a detainee with severe mental illness received mental health services while in jail as a function of demographic and clinical characteristics. Overall, 70 % of persons with severe mental illness did receive in-jail mental health treatment. Small, but statistically significant sex and race differences were observed in who received treatment in the jail psychiatric unit or from the jail infirmary. Findings confirm the jail's central role in mental health treatment and emphasize the need for greater information sharing and collaboration with community mental health agencies to minimize jail use and to facilitate successful community reentry for detainees with severe mental illness.
Authors
Sayers, SK; Domino, ME; Cuddeback, GS; Barrett, NJ; Morrissey, JP
MLA Citation
Sayers, Sean K., et al. “Connecting Mentally Ill Detainees in Large Urban Jails with Community Care..” Psychiatr Q, vol. 88, no. 2, June 2017, pp. 323–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11126-016-9449-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1134832
PMID
27342104
Source
pubmed
Published In
Psychiatr Q
Volume
88
Published Date
Start Page
323
End Page
333
DOI
10.1007/s11126-016-9449-8