Nadine Barrett

Overview:

Dr, Nadine J. Barrett is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Duke University. She currently hold senior leadership roles as CTSI Co-Director for Equity and Stakeholder Strategy and the Inaugural Director of The Center for Equity in Research in the Duke Clinical Translational Science Institute, and Associate Director for Equity and Stakeholder Strategy, Duke Cancer Institute. A medical sociologist by training, Dr. Barrett is a health disparities researcher, expert equity strategist, and a nationally-recognized leader in facilitating community/stakeholder and academic partnerships to advance health equity and developing training and methods to address implicit bias and structural and systemic racism that limits diverse participation in biomedical research. Her goals are to integrate diverse stakeholder engagement in the research process and healthcare systems, enhance enrollment and retention of underrepresented groups in biomedical research, increase diversity in the research workforce, and advance health equity. Prior to her current role, Dr. Barrett was the inaugural director of the Duke Cancer Institute’s Office of Health Equity, where for eight years she led a team to create a nationally awarded community engagement model to advance health equity, through patient navigation, nationally funded pipeline training programs for underrepresented race and ethnic groups, and authentic community partnerships to inform and drive research and quality healthcare as advisors, experts, and participants. Her leadership in both nonprofit and academia spans local, national, and international partnerships to better serve and engage historically marginalized and underserved populations.



Positions:

Assistant Professor in Family Medicine and Community Health

Family Medicine and Community Health, Community Health
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

Ph.D. 2005

Texas Woman's University

Grants:

Just Ask - Increasing Diversity in Oncology Clinical Research and Trials An Institutional and Stakeholder Engagement Approach

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
V Foundation for Cancer Research
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Lung Cancer Screening Initiative

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Lung Cancer Initiative of North Carolina
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Breast Cancer Awareness to Action Ambassador Program (BCAAAP)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Susan G Komen for the Cure
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

JAK-STAT Inhibition to Reduce Racial Disparities in Kidney Disease

Administered By
Duke Molecular Physiology Institute
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT 2020

Cancer health disparities are an enormous public health challenge in the United States. ` Racial and ethnic minority populations are among the U.S. population groups that have long experienced cancer health disparities. ` Many of the U.S. population groups that experience cancer health disparities are also experiencing disparities related to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. ` There has been progress in reducing cancer incidence and health disparities, as illustrated by the fact that disparities in the overall cancer death rates among racial and ethnic groups are less pronounced now than they have been in the past two decades. ` Striking disparities in exposure to preventable cancer risk factors, rates of cancer screening for early detection, receipt of standard of care cancer treatment, and the burden of adverse effects of cancer and cancer treatment persist for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved populations in the United States. ` Researchers have identified many factors that contribute to cancer health disparities and learned that these factors are complex and interrelated. ` Many studies and initiatives are beginning to provide deep insight into the biological and genetic factors that contribute to cancer health disparities. ` Enhancing diversity in the pool of trainees, researchers, and health care workers, and developing science-based public policies that advance cancer prevention and early detection for individuals, families, and communities will allow us to overcome cancer health disparities.
Authors
Carpten, J; Springfield, S; Foti, M
MLA Citation
Carpten, John, et al. “AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT 2020.” AACR CANCER DISPARITIES PROGRESS REPORT.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501185
Source
manual

Abstract A080: Rates of Invitation, participation, and willingness to engage in medical and clinical research: Findings from attendees at two gender-specific community-based screening programs

Authors
Ingraham, KL; Packenham, J; Harvey, D; Patierno, S; Barrett, NJ
MLA Citation
Ingraham, Kearston L., et al. “Abstract A080: Rates of Invitation, participation, and willingness to engage in medical and clinical research: Findings from attendees at two gender-specific community-based screening programs.” Poster Presentations  Proffered Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-a080.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467300
Source
crossref
Published In
Poster Presentations Proffered Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-a080

Abstract IA18: North Carolina Central University and Duke Cancer Institute's collaborative cancer research and education program: Connecting cancer disparities translational research, clinical trials operations, and community engagement

Authors
Williams, KP; Barrett, NJ; Oldham, CE; Hough, H; Woodard, A; Freedman, J; Devi, GR; Patierno, SR
MLA Citation
Williams, Kevin P., et al. “Abstract IA18: North Carolina Central University and Duke Cancer Institute's collaborative cancer research and education program: Connecting cancer disparities translational research, clinical trials operations, and community engagement.” Oral Presentations  Invited Abstracts, American Association for Cancer Research, 2020. Crossref, doi:10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-ia18.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467305
Source
crossref
Published In
Oral Presentations Invited Abstracts
Published Date
DOI
10.1158/1538-7755.disp18-ia18

Rates of Invitation, participation, and willingness to engage in medical and clinical research: Findings from attendees at two gender-specific community-based screening programs

Authors
Ingraham, KL; Packenham, J; Harvey, D; Patierno, S; Barrett, NJ
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467308
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
29
Published Date

Current unmet needs in inflammatory breast cancer/IBC patient care: Analysis of open-ended responses from a community engagement session of clinicians, researchers, advocates, and patients at the Duke Consortium for IBC conference

Authors
Devi, GR; Lane, W; Hough, HJ; Ingraham, KL; Gearhart, L; Barrett, NJ
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467326
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume
29
Published Date