Mustafa Bashir

Overview:

Hepatobiliary and pancreatic imaging
Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma)
Fatty liver, NAFLD, and NASH
Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis
Pancreatic cancer
Technical development in MRI
Quantitative imaging

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine

Medicine, Gastroenterology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of Iowa

Grants:

Imaging Core Lab for Madrigal Protocol MGL-3196-05 (A Phase 2, Multi-Center, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of MGL-3196 in Patients With Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis)

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Awarded By
Madrigal Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A PHASE 2B RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED STUDY EVALUATING THE SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF BMS-986036 (PEG-FGF21) IN ADULTS WITH NONALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS (NASH) AND STAGE 3 LIVER FIBROSIS.

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Awarded By
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

3V2640-CLIN-005 A Phase 2, Multi-Center, Single-Blind, Randomized Placebo Controlled Study of TVB-2640 in Subjects with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Awarded By
Diabetes & Endocrinology Consultants, PC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized, open label, phase 1b study to evaluate safety, PK and PD signals of DUR-928 in patients with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Awarded By
High Point Clinical Trial Center
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 2, Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo Controlled, Parallel Group, Multiple Center Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of NGM282 Administered for 12 Weeks in Patients with Histologically Confirmed Nonalcoholic Steatohepatit

Administered By
Medicine, Gastroenterology
Awarded By
NGM Biopharmaceuticals
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

VALIDATION OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY RISK PREDICTION SCORES TO PREDICT CLINICAL EVENTS IN PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS

Authors
Koutlas, N; Allen, BC; Helzberg, JH; Niedzwiecki, D; Parish, A; Bashir, MR; Muir, AJ
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1450624
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Gastroenterology
Volume
158
Published Date
Start Page
S1372
End Page
S1373

LI-RADS ancillary feature prediction of longitudinal category changes in LR-3 observations: an exploratory study.

PURPOSE: To determine whether LI-RADS ancillary features predict longitudinal LR-3 observation category changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This exploratory, retrospective, single-center study with an independent reading center included patients who underwent two or more multiphase CT or MRI examinations for hepatocellular carcinoma assessment between 2011 and 2015. Three readers independently evaluated each observation using CT/MRI LI-RADS v2017, and observations categorized LR-3 using major features only were included in the analysis. Prevalence of major and ancillary features was calculated. After excluding low-frequency (< 5%) features, inter-reader agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Major and ancillary feature prediction of observation upgrade (to LR-4 or higher) or downgrade (to LR-1 or LR-2) on follow-up imaging was assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: 141 LR-3 observations in 79 patients were included. Arterial phase hyperenhancement, washout, restricted diffusion, mild-moderate T2 hyperintensity, and hepatobiliary phase hypointensity were frequent enough for further analysis (consensus prevalence 5.0-66.0%). ICCs for inter-reader agreement ranged from 0.18 for restricted diffusion to 0.48 for hepatobiliary phase hypointensity. On follow-up, 40% (57/141) of baseline LR-3 observations remained LR-3. 8% (11/141) were downgraded to LR-2, and 42% (59/141) were downgraded to LR-1. A small number were ultimately upgraded to LR-4 (2%, 3/141) or LR-5 (8%, 11/141). None of the assessed major or ancillary features was significantly associated with observation category change. Longer follow-up time was significantly associated with both observation upgrade and downgrade. CONCLUSION: While numerous ancillary features are described in LI-RADS, most are rarely present and are not useful predictors of LR-3 observation category changes.
Authors
Shropshire, E; Mamidipalli, A; Wolfson, T; Allen, BC; Jaffe, TA; Igarashi, S; Higaki, A; Tanabe, M; Gamst, A; Sirlin, CB; Bashir, MR
MLA Citation
Shropshire, Erin, et al. “LI-RADS ancillary feature prediction of longitudinal category changes in LR-3 observations: an exploratory study.Abdom Radiol (Ny), Feb. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00261-020-02429-2.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1432056
PMID
32052132
Source
pubmed
Published In
Abdom Radiol (Ny)
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s00261-020-02429-2

Gadoxetate-enhanced abbreviated MRI is highly accurate for hepatocellular carcinoma screening.

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to compare the performance of 3 different abbreviated MRI (AMRI) sets extracted from a complete gadoxetate-enhanced MRI obtained for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening. Secondary objective was to perform a preliminary cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing each AMRI set to published ultrasound performance for HCC screening in the USA. METHODS: This retrospective study included 237 consecutive patients (M/F, 146/91; mean age, 58 years) with chronic liver disease who underwent a complete gadoxetate-enhanced MRI for HCC screening in 2017 in a single institution. Two radiologists independently reviewed 3 AMRI sets extracted from the complete exam: non-contrast (NC-AMRI: T2-weighted imaging (T2wi)+diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)), dynamic-AMRI (Dyn-AMRI: T2wi+DWI+dynamic T1wi), and hepatobiliary phase AMRI (HBP-AMRI: T2wi+DWI+T1wi during the HBP). Each patient was classified as HCC-positive/HCC-negative based on the reference standard, which consisted in all available patient data. Diagnostic performance for HCC detection was compared between sets. Estimated set characteristics, including historical ultrasound data, were incorporated into a microsimulation model for cost-effectiveness analysis. RESULTS: The reference standard identified 13/237 patients with HCC (prevalence, 5.5%; mean size, 33.7 ± 30 mm). Pooled sensitivities were 61.5% for NC-AMRI (95% confidence intervals, 34.4-83%), 84.6% for Dyn-AMRI (60.8-95.1%), and 80.8% for HBP-AMRI (53.6-93.9%), without difference between sets (p range, 0.06-0.16). Pooled specificities were 95.5% (92.4-97.4%), 99.8% (98.4-100%), and 94.9% (91.6-96.9%), respectively, with a significant difference between Dyn-AMRI and the other sets (p < 0.01). All AMRI methods were effective compared with ultrasound, with life-year gain of 3-12 months against incremental costs of US$ < 12,000. CONCLUSIONS: NC-AMRI has limited sensitivity for HCC detection, while HBP-AMRI and Dyn-AMRI showed excellent sensitivity and specificity, the latter being slightly higher for Dyn-AMRI. Cost-effectiveness estimates showed that AMRI is effective compared with ultrasound. KEY POINTS: • Comparison of different abbreviated MRI (AMRI) sets reconstructed from a complete gadoxetate MRI demonstrated that non-contrast AMRI has low sensitivity (61.5%) compared with contrast-enhanced AMRI (80.8% for hepatobiliary phase AMRI and 84.6% for dynamic AMRI), with all sets having high specificity. • Non-contrast and hepatobiliary phase AMRI can be performed in less than 14 min (including set-up time), while dynamic AMRI can be performed in less than 17 min. • All AMRI sets were cost-effective for HCC screening in at-risk population in comparison with ultrasound.
Authors
Vietti Violi, N; Lewis, S; Liao, J; Hulkower, M; Hernandez-Meza, G; Smith, K; Babb, JS; Chin, X; Song, J; Said, D; Kihira, S; Sirlin, CB; Reeder, SB; Bashir, MR; Fowler, KJ; Ferket, BS; Sigel, K; Taouli, B
MLA Citation
Vietti Violi, Naik, et al. “Gadoxetate-enhanced abbreviated MRI is highly accurate for hepatocellular carcinoma screening.Eur Radiol, June 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s00330-020-07014-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1448807
PMID
32588209
Source
pubmed
Published In
Eur Radiol
Published Date
DOI
10.1007/s00330-020-07014-1

Impact of obeticholic acid on the lipoprotein profile in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obeticholic acid (OCA), a farnesoid X receptor agonist, increases total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of OCA therapy on lipoprotein sub-particles. METHOD: This study included 196 patients (99 OCA group and 97 placebo group) who were enrolled in the FLINT trial and had samples available for lipid analysis and liver biopsies at enrollment and end-of-treatment (EOT) at 72 weeks. Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles were evaluated at baseline, 12 and 72 weeks after randomization, and 24 weeks following EOT. RESULTS: Baseline lipoprotein profiles were similar among OCA and placebo groups. OCA did not affect total VLDL particle concentrations, but OCA vs. placebo treatment was associated with decreased large VLDL particle concentration at 12 weeks (baseline-adjusted mean: 6.8 vs. 8.9 nmol/L; p = 0.002), mirrored by an increase in less atherogenic, small VLDL particle concentration (33.9 vs. 28.0 nmol/L; p = 0.02). After 12 weeks, total LDL particle concentration was higher in the OCA group than the placebo group (1,667 vs. 1,329 nmol/L; p <0.0001), characterized by corresponding increases in both less atherogenic, large-buoyant LDL (475 vs. 308 nmol/L; p ≤0.001) and more atherogenic small-dense LDL particles (1,015 vs. 872 nmol/L; p = 0.002). The changes in LDL particle concentrations were similar between treatment groups (OCA and placebo) 24 weeks following EOT due to improvement in the OCA cohort. Compared to placebo, a reduction in total HDL particle concentration, particularly large and medium HDL particles, was noted in the OCA-treated patients, but this resolved after drug discontinuation. CONCLUSION: OCA therapy is associated with increases in small VLDL particles, large and small LDL particles, and a reduction in HDL particles at 12 weeks. These lipoprotein concentrations reverted to baseline values 24 weeks after drug discontinuation. LAY SUMMARY: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is a chronic liver disease that is associated with an increased risk of developing cirrhosis and cardiovascular disease. Recently, obeticholic acid (OCA), a farnesoid X receptor agonist, improved liver disease but led to an increase in cholesterol. However, the impact of OCA on cholesterol is not well understood. In the present study, we show that OCA therapy is associated with a detrimental increase in lipoprotein levels, which improves after drug discontinuation. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers: NCT01265498.
Authors
Siddiqui, MS; Van Natta, ML; Connelly, MA; Vuppalanchi, R; Neuschwander-Tetri, BA; Tonascia, J; Guy, C; Loomba, R; Dasarathy, S; Wattacheril, J; Chalasani, N; Sanyal, AJ; NASH CRN,
MLA Citation
Siddiqui, Mohammad Shadab, et al. “Impact of obeticholic acid on the lipoprotein profile in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.J Hepatol, vol. 72, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 25–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jhep.2019.10.006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423611
PMID
31634532
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Hepatol
Volume
72
Published Date
Start Page
25
End Page
33
DOI
10.1016/j.jhep.2019.10.006

140-LB: NGM313, a Novel Activator of b-Klotho/FGFR1c, Improves Insulin Resistance and Reduces Hepatic Fat in Obese, Nondiabetic Subjects

Authors
DEPAOLI, A; PHUNG, VAN; BASHIR, MR; MORROW, L; BEYSEN, C; YAN, A; LING, LEI; BAXTER, B; LUSKEY, KL; OLEFSKY, JM
MLA Citation
DEPAOLI, A. L. E. X., et al. “140-LB: NGM313, a Novel Activator of b-Klotho/FGFR1c, Improves Insulin Resistance and Reduces Hepatic Fat in Obese, Nondiabetic Subjects.” Diabetes, vol. 68, no. Supplement 1, American Diabetes Association, 2019, pp. 140-LB. Crossref, doi:10.2337/db19-140-lb.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426853
Source
crossref
Published In
Diabetes
Volume
68
Published Date
Start Page
140
End Page
LB
DOI
10.2337/db19-140-lb