Mustafa Bashir

Overview:

Hepatobiliary and pancreatic imaging
Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma)
Fatty liver, NAFLD, and NASH
Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis
Pancreatic cancer
Technical development in MRI
Quantitative imaging

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiology

Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
School of Medicine

Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine

Medicine, Gastroenterology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2004

University of Iowa

Grants:

Imaging Core Lab for Madrigal Protocol MGL-3196-05

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

PRA Health BMS-986036 (PEG-FGF21)

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

3V2640-CLIN-005 A Phase 2, Multi-Center, Single-Blind, Randomized Placebo Controlled Study of TVB-2640 in Subjects with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A randomized, open label, phase 1b study to evaluate safety, PK and PD signals of DUR-928 in patients with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

Administered By
Radiology, Abdominal Imaging
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

NGM 15-0105

Administered By
Medicine, Gastroenterology
Role
Co-Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Chronic Liver Disease.

The liver fibrosis stage is the most important clinical determinate of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic liver diseases. With newer therapies, liver fibrosis can be stabilized and possibly reversed, thus accurate diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis are clinically important. Ultrasound, CT, and conventional MRI can be used to establish the diagnosis of advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis but have limited utility for assessing earlier stages of fibrosis. Elastography-based ultrasound and MRI techniques are more useful for assessment of precirrhotic hepatic fibrosis. In patients with advanced fibrosis at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), ultrasound is the surveillance modality recommended by international guidelines in nearly all circumstances. However, in patients in whom ultrasound does not assess the liver well, including those with severe steatosis or obesity, multiphase CT or MRI may have a role in surveillance for HCC. Both multiphase CT and MRI can be used for continued surveillance in patients with a history of HCC, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may have an emerging role in this setting. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.
Authors
Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging,; Bashir, MR; Horowitz, JM; Kamel, IR; Arif-Tiwari, H; Asrani, SK; Chernyak, V; Goldstein, A; Grajo, JR; Hindman, NM; Kamaya, A; McNamara, MM; Porter, KK; Solnes, LB; Srivastava, PK; Zaheer, A; Carucci, LR
MLA Citation
Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging, Laura R., et al. “ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Chronic Liver Disease.Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr, vol. 17, no. 5S, May 2020, pp. S70–80. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2020.01.023.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438013
PMID
32370979
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
S70
End Page
S80
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2020.01.023

ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Pancreatic Cyst.

Incidental pancreatic cysts are increasingly detected on imaging studies performed for unrelated indications and may be incompletely characterized on these studies. Adequate morphological characterization is critical due to the small risk of malignant degeneration associated with neoplastic pancreatic cysts, as well as the risk of associated pancreatic adenocarcinoma. For all pancreatic cysts, both size and morphology determine management. Specifically, imaging detection of features, such as pancreatic ductal communication and presence or absence of worrisome features or high-risk stigmata, have important management implications. The recommendations in this publication determine the appropriate initial imaging study to further evaluate a pancreatic cyst that was incidentally detected on a nondedicated imaging study. The recommendations are designed to maximize the yield of diagnostic information in order to better risk-stratify pancreatic cysts and assist in guiding future management. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.
Authors
Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging,; Fábrega-Foster, K; Kamel, IR; Horowitz, JM; Arif-Tiwari, H; Bashir, MR; Chernyak, V; Goldstein, A; Grajo, JR; Hindman, NM; Kamaya, A; McNamara, MM; Porter, KK; Scheiman, JM; Solnes, LB; Srivastava, PK; Zaheer, A; Carucci, LR
MLA Citation
Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging, Laura R., et al. “ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Pancreatic Cyst.Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr, vol. 17, no. 5S, May 2020, pp. S198–206. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.jacr.2020.01.021.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438014
PMID
32370963
Source
epmc
Published In
Journal of the American College of Radiology : Jacr
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
S198
End Page
S206
DOI
10.1016/j.jacr.2020.01.021

Impact of obeticholic acid on the lipoprotein profile in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obeticholic acid (OCA), a farnesoid X receptor agonist, increases total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of OCA therapy on lipoprotein sub-particles. METHOD: This study included 196 patients (99 OCA group and 97 placebo group) who were enrolled in the FLINT trial and had samples available for lipid analysis and liver biopsies at enrollment and end-of-treatment (EOT) at 72 weeks. Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles were evaluated at baseline, 12 and 72 weeks after randomization, and 24 weeks following EOT. RESULTS: Baseline lipoprotein profiles were similar among OCA and placebo groups. OCA did not affect total VLDL particle concentrations, but OCA vs. placebo treatment was associated with decreased large VLDL particle concentration at 12 weeks (baseline-adjusted mean: 6.8 vs. 8.9 nmol/L; p = 0.002), mirrored by an increase in less atherogenic, small VLDL particle concentration (33.9 vs. 28.0 nmol/L; p = 0.02). After 12 weeks, total LDL particle concentration was higher in the OCA group than the placebo group (1,667 vs. 1,329 nmol/L; p <0.0001), characterized by corresponding increases in both less atherogenic, large-buoyant LDL (475 vs. 308 nmol/L; p ≤0.001) and more atherogenic small-dense LDL particles (1,015 vs. 872 nmol/L; p = 0.002). The changes in LDL particle concentrations were similar between treatment groups (OCA and placebo) 24 weeks following EOT due to improvement in the OCA cohort. Compared to placebo, a reduction in total HDL particle concentration, particularly large and medium HDL particles, was noted in the OCA-treated patients, but this resolved after drug discontinuation. CONCLUSION: OCA therapy is associated with increases in small VLDL particles, large and small LDL particles, and a reduction in HDL particles at 12 weeks. These lipoprotein concentrations reverted to baseline values 24 weeks after drug discontinuation. LAY SUMMARY: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is a chronic liver disease that is associated with an increased risk of developing cirrhosis and cardiovascular disease. Recently, obeticholic acid (OCA), a farnesoid X receptor agonist, improved liver disease but led to an increase in cholesterol. However, the impact of OCA on cholesterol is not well understood. In the present study, we show that OCA therapy is associated with a detrimental increase in lipoprotein levels, which improves after drug discontinuation. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers: NCT01265498.
Authors
Siddiqui, MS; Van Natta, ML; Connelly, MA; Vuppalanchi, R; Neuschwander-Tetri, BA; Tonascia, J; Guy, C; Loomba, R; Dasarathy, S; Wattacheril, J; Chalasani, N; Sanyal, AJ; NASH CRN,
MLA Citation
Siddiqui, Mohammad Shadab, et al. “Impact of obeticholic acid on the lipoprotein profile in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.J Hepatol, vol. 72, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 25–33. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jhep.2019.10.006.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1423611
PMID
31634532
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Hepatol
Volume
72
Published Date
Start Page
25
End Page
33
DOI
10.1016/j.jhep.2019.10.006

140-LB: NGM313, a Novel Activator of b-Klotho/FGFR1c, Improves Insulin Resistance and Reduces Hepatic Fat in Obese, Nondiabetic Subjects

Authors
DEPAOLI, A; PHUNG, VAN; BASHIR, MR; MORROW, L; BEYSEN, C; YAN, A; LING, LEI; BAXTER, B; LUSKEY, KL; OLEFSKY, JM
MLA Citation
DEPAOLI, A. L. E. X., et al. “140-LB: NGM313, a Novel Activator of b-Klotho/FGFR1c, Improves Insulin Resistance and Reduces Hepatic Fat in Obese, Nondiabetic Subjects.” Diabetes, vol. 68, no. Supplement 1, American Diabetes Association, 2019, pp. 140-LB. Crossref, doi:10.2337/db19-140-lb.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1426853
Source
crossref
Published In
Diabetes
Volume
68
Published Date
Start Page
140
End Page
LB
DOI
10.2337/db19-140-lb

Great Expectations: Can Magnetic Resonance Elastography Accelerate Progress in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Research?

Authors
Bashir, MR; Muir, AJ
MLA Citation
Bashir, Mustafa R., and Andrew J. Muir. “Great Expectations: Can Magnetic Resonance Elastography Accelerate Progress in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Research?Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol, vol. 18, no. 7, June 2020, pp. 1436–38. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2019.12.013.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424290
PMID
31863860
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
1436
End Page
1438
DOI
10.1016/j.cgh.2019.12.013