Julia Butt

Positions:

Postdoctoral Associate

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Publications:

Smoking, Helicobacter Pylori Serology, and Gastric Cancer Risk in Prospective Studies from China, Japan, and Korea.

Smoking is an established risk factor for gastric cancer development. In this study, we aimed to assess prospectively the association of smoking with gastric cancer risk in 1,446 non-cardia gastric cancer cases and 1,796 controls from China, Japan, and Korea with consideration of Helicobacter pylori infection as a potential effect modifier. Applying logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and sex we found that current, but not former, smoking was significantly associated with gastric cancer risk [OR = 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.65]. However, the association was significant only in H. pylori sero-positive individuals determined by 3 different sero-markers: overall sero-positivity, sero-positivity to the onco-protein CagA, and sero-positivity to the gastric cancer associated sero-marker HP0305 and HP1564. Specifically, a significant interaction was found when stratifying by HP0305/HP1564 (Pinteraction = 0.01) with a 46% increased risk of gastric cancer among HP0305/HP1564 sero-positive current smokers (95% CI, 1.10-1.93) as opposed to no increased gastric cancer risk among HP0305/HP1564 sero-negative current smokers (OR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.65-1.33). We confirmed that current smoking is associated with an increased gastric cancer risk, however, only among individuals that are simultaneously sero-positive for the leading causal factor for gastric cancer, H. pylori.
Authors
Butt, J; Varga, MG; Wang, T; Tsugane, S; Shimazu, T; Zheng, W; Abnet, CC; Yoo, K-Y; Park, SK; Kim, J; Jee, SH; Qiao, Y-L; Shu, X-O; Waterboer, T; Pawlita, M; Epplein, M
MLA Citation
Butt, Julia, et al. “Smoking, Helicobacter Pylori Serology, and Gastric Cancer Risk in Prospective Studies from China, Japan, and Korea.Cancer Prev Res (Phila), vol. 12, no. 10, 2019, pp. 667–74. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-19-0238.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1388302
PMID
31350279
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
Volume
12
Published Date
Start Page
667
End Page
674
DOI
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-19-0238

Antibody responses to flagellin C and Streptococcus gallolyticus pilus proteins in colorectal cancer.

Antibodies to Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG) have been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Because SGG may correlate with impaired gut epithelia, we assessed the association of antibodies to bacterial flagellin C (FliC), a measure potentially related to this impairment, with CRC and the CRC-specific interaction with antibodies to SGG proteins. Antibodies to FliC and SGG pilus proteins Gallo2178 and Gallo2179 were measured in two independent studies, a combined study from Nijmegen and Detroit (93 CRC cases, 74 controls) and a replication data set including 576 cases and 576 controls from the Spanish multicenter multicase-control study (MCC-Spain). Logistic regression was applied to assess whether antibodies to FliC were associated with CRC and modified the association of antibodies to SGG proteins with CRC. Antibodies to FliC were associated with those to SGG Gallo2178 among CRC cases, resulting in an interaction in the association of antibodies to Gallo2178 with CRC (p = 0.007). This association was only present among individuals with high antibody responses to FliC (OR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.45-4.06). In conclusion, our findings suggest that colorectal tumorigenesis could be accompanied by an impaired integrity of the epithelium that could result in associated increased antibody responses to bacterial proteins.
Authors
Butt, J; Fernández de Larrea, N; Tjalsma, H; Roelofs, R; Kato, I; Martín, V; Pérez-Gómez, B; Moreno, V; Dierssen-Sotos, T; Castilla, J; Fernández-Tardón, G; Amiano, P; Salas, D; Alguacil, J; Jiménez-Moleón, JJ; Huerta, JM; de Sanjosé, S; Del Campo, R; Kogevinas, M; Pollán, M; Pawlita, M; Waterboer, T; Boleij, A; Aragonés, N
MLA Citation
Butt, Julia, et al. “Antibody responses to flagellin C and Streptococcus gallolyticus pilus proteins in colorectal cancer..” Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, July 2019. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47347-6.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1403159
PMID
31350458
Source
epmc
Published In
Scientific Reports
Volume
9
Published Date
Start Page
10847
DOI
10.1038/s41598-019-47347-6

Reply.

Authors
Butt, J; Varga, MG; Epplein, M
MLA Citation
Butt, Julia, et al. “Reply.Gastroenterology, vol. 156, no. 8, June 2019, p. 2356. Pubmed, doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2019.04.040.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub794750
PMID
31039340
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gastroenterology
Volume
156
Published Date
Start Page
2356
DOI
10.1053/j.gastro.2019.04.040

Serologic Response to Helicobacter pylori Proteins Associated With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Diverse Populations in the United States.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Previous studies reported an association of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of gastric cancer, and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, these findings have been inconsistent, appear to vary with population characteristics, and may be specific for virulence factor VacA. To more thoroughly evaluate the potential association of H pylori antibodies with CRC risk, we assembled a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations in the United States. METHODS: We used H pylori multiplex serologic assays to analyze serum samples from 4063 incident cases of CRC, collected before diagnosis, and 4063 matched individuals without CRC (controls) from 10 prospective cohorts for antibody responses to 13 H pylori proteins, including virulence factors VacA and CagA. The association of seropositivity to H pylori proteins, as well as protein-specific antibody level, with odds of CRC was determined by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, 40% of controls and 41% of cases were H pylori-seropositive (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20). H pylori VacA-specific seropositivity was associated with an 11% increased odds of CRC (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.22), and this association was particularly strong among African Americans (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.08-1.95). Additionally, odds of CRC increased with level of VacA antibody in the overall cohort (P = .008) and specifically among African Americans (P = .007). CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations, we found serologic responses to H pylori VacA to associate with increased risk of CRC risk, particularly for African Americans. Future studies should seek to understand whether this marker is related to virulent H pylori strains carried in these populations.
Authors
Butt, J; Varga, MG; Blot, WJ; Teras, L; Visvanathan, K; Le Marchand, L; Haiman, C; Chen, Y; Bao, Y; Sesso, HD; Wassertheil-Smoller, S; Ho, GYF; Tinker, LE; Peek, RM; Potter, JD; Cover, TL; Hendrix, LH; Huang, L-C; Hyslop, T; Um, C; Grodstein, F; Song, M; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Berndt, S; Hildesheim, A; Waterboer, T; Pawlita, M; Epplein, M
MLA Citation
Butt, Julia, et al. “Serologic Response to Helicobacter pylori Proteins Associated With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Diverse Populations in the United States.Gastroenterology, vol. 156, no. 1, 2019, pp. 175-186.e2. Pubmed, doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2018.09.054.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1353203
PMID
30296434
Source
pubmed
Published In
Gastroenterology
Volume
156
Published Date
Start Page
175
End Page
186.e2
DOI
10.1053/j.gastro.2018.09.054

Validation of a Blood Biomarker for Identification of Individuals at High Risk for Gastric Cancer.

BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the leading cause of gastric cancer, yet the majority of infected individuals will not develop neoplasia. Previously, we developed and replicated serologic H. pylori biomarkers for gastric cancer risk among prospective cohorts in East Asia and now seek to validate the performance of these biomarkers in identifying individuals with premalignant lesions. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 1,402 individuals from Linqu County screened by upper endoscopy. H. pylori protein-specific antibody levels were assessed using multiplex serology. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalent intestinal metaplasia, indefinite dysplasia, or dysplasia, compared with superficial or mild atrophic gastritis. RESULTS: Compared with individuals seronegative to Omp and HP0305, individuals seropositive to both were seven times more likely to have precancerous lesions (OR, 7.43; 95% CI, 5.59-9.88). A classification model for precancerous lesions that includes age, smoking, and seropositivity to H. pylori, Omp, and HP0305 resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.751 (95% CI, 0.725-0.777), which is significantly better than the same model, including the established gastric cancer risk factor CagA (AUC, 0.718; 95% CI, 0.691-0.746, Pdifference = 0.0002). CONCLUSIONS: The present study of prevalent precancerous gastric lesions provides support for two new serum biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, Omp and HP 0305. IMPACT: Our results support further research into the serological biomarkers Omp and HP0305 as possible improvements over the established virulence marker CagA for identifying individuals with precancerous lesions in East Asia.
Authors
Epplein, M; Butt, J; Zhang, Y; Hendrix, LH; Abnet, CC; Murphy, G; Zheng, W; Shu, X-O; Tsugane, S; Qiao, Y-L; Taylor, PR; Shimazu, T; Yoo, K-Y; Park, SK; Kim, J; Jee, SH; Waterboer, T; Pawlita, M; You, W-C; Pan, K-F
MLA Citation
Epplein, Meira, et al. “Validation of a Blood Biomarker for Identification of Individuals at High Risk for Gastric Cancer.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, vol. 27, no. 12, Dec. 2018, pp. 1472–79. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0582.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1346702
PMID
30158280
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
1472
End Page
1479
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0582