Colin Champ

Overview:

I am a radiation oncologist interested in researching the interaction between diet, exercise, and metabolism. My research interests include modulating metabolism through diet, exercise, general activity, and pharmaceutical agents and the impact of body composition on outcomes. My goal is to assess whether exercise, and specifically weight training and functional exercise training can help improve overall health and potentially cancer-specific outcomes in patients treated for breast cancer and lymphoma.

Positions:

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

Radiation Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2008

Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Internship, Medicine

Crozer-Chester Medical Center

Residency, Medicine

Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Chief Resident, Medicine

Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology

University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

ABR Certification, American Board Of Radiology

American Board of Radiology

Publications:

A Phase I clinical trial of dose-escalated metabolic therapy combined with concomitant radiation therapy in high-grade glioma.

BACKGROUND: Animal brain-tumor models have demonstrated a synergistic interaction between radiation therapy and a ketogenic diet (KD). Metformin has in-vitro anti-cancer activity, through AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition. We hypothesized that the metabolic stress induced by a KD combined with metformin would enhance radiation's efficacy. We sought to assess the tolerability and feasibility of this approach. METHODS: A single-institution phase I clinical trial. Radiotherapy was either 60 or 35 Gy over 6 or 2 weeks, for newly diagnosed and recurrent gliomas, respectively. The dietary intervention consisted of a Modified Atkins Diet (ModAD) supplemented with medium chain triglycerides (MCT). There were three cohorts: Dietary intervention alone, and dietary intervention combined with low-dose or high-dose metformin; all patients received radiotherapy. Factors associated with blood ketone levels were investigated using a mixed-model analysis. RESULTS: A total of 13 patients were accrued, median age 61 years, of whom six had newly diagnosed and seven with recurrent disease. All completed radiation therapy; five patients stopped the metabolic intervention early. Metformin 850 mg three-times daily was poorly tolerated. There were no serious adverse events. Ketone levels were associated with dietary factors (ketogenic ratio, p < 0.001), use of metformin (p = 0. 02) and low insulin levels (p = 0.002). Median progression free survival was ten and four months for newly diagnosed and recurrent disease, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention was well tolerated. Higher serum ketone levels were associated with both dietary intake and metformin use. The recommended phase II dose is eight weeks of a ModAD combined with 850 mg metformin twice daily.
Authors
Porper, K; Shpatz, Y; Plotkin, L; Pechthold, RG; Talianski, A; Champ, CE; Furman, O; Shimoni-Sebag, A; Symon, Z; Amit, U; Hemi, R; Kanety, H; Mardor, Y; Cohen, ZR; Jan, E; Genssin, H; Anikster, Y; Zach, L; Lawrence, YR
MLA Citation
Porper, Keren, et al. “A Phase I clinical trial of dose-escalated metabolic therapy combined with concomitant radiation therapy in high-grade glioma.J Neurooncol, vol. 153, no. 3, July 2021, pp. 487–96. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s11060-021-03786-8.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1490159
PMID
34152528
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Neurooncol
Volume
153
Published Date
Start Page
487
End Page
496
DOI
10.1007/s11060-021-03786-8

Comment on “The Effect of Resistance Training on Body Composition During and After Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”

Authors
Champ, CE; Rosenberg, J; Nakfoor, BM; Hyde, PN
MLA Citation
Champ, Colin E., et al. “Comment on “The Effect of Resistance Training on Body Composition During and After Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”.” Sports Medicine, Springer Science and Business Media LLC. Crossref, doi:10.1007/s40279-021-01595-7.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1501296
Source
crossref
Published In
Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)
DOI
10.1007/s40279-021-01595-7

Dietary-Induced Ketogenesis: Adults Are Not Children.

There is increasing interest in the use of a ketogenic diet for various adult disorders; however, the ability of adults to generate ketones is unknown. Our goal was to challenge the hypothesis that there would be no difference between adults and children regarding their ability to enter ketosis. METHODS: Two populations were studied, both treated with identical very low-carbohydrate high-fat diets: a retrospective series of children with epilepsy or/and metabolic disorders (2009-2016) and a prospective clinical trial of adults with glioblastoma. Dietary intake was assessed based upon written food diaries and 24-h dietary recall. Ketogenic ratio was calculated according to [grams of fat consumed]/[grams of carbohydrate and protein consumed]. Ketone levels (β-hydroxybutyrate) were measured in blood and/or urine. RESULTS: A total of 168 encounters amongst 28 individuals were analyzed. Amongst both children and adults, ketone levels correlated with nutritional ketogenic ratio; however, the absolute ketone levels in adults were approximately one quarter of those seen in children. This difference was highly significant in a multivariate linear regression model, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: For diets with comparable ketogenic ratios, adults have lower blood ketone levels than children; consequently, high levels of nutritional ketosis are unobtainable in adults.
Authors
Porper, K; Zach, L; Shpatz, Y; Ben-Zeev, B; Tzadok, M; Jan, E; Talianski, A; Champ, CE; Symon, Z; Anikster, Y; Lawrence, YR
MLA Citation
Porper, Keren, et al. “Dietary-Induced Ketogenesis: Adults Are Not Children.Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 9, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/nu13093093.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496148
PMID
34578970
Source
pubmed
Published In
Nutrients
Volume
13
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/nu13093093

Recumbent Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy.

Purpose: Our purpose was to describe preliminary dosimetric and clinical results of a recumbent total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) technique and compare this to a conventional standing TSEBT technique. Methods and Materials: A customized treatment platform with recessed side wheels was constructed and commissioned for patients to be treated in a recumbent position. Dosimetric and clinical information was collected for patients treated with this new recumbent technique in addition to that of a cohort of patients treated contemporaneously using the conventional standing method. Dose delivery and clinical outcomes were compared for patients treated with the recumbent and standing techniques. Results: Between 2017 and 2019, 27 patients were treated with TSEBT with the recumbent (n = 13) or conventional standing technique (n = 14) at our institution. Measured dose at 15 body sites could be directly compared. Of these, 10 showed no significant difference between the two techniques while five sites showed significant differences in median measured dose, including the top of left shoulder, right biceps, bend of left elbow, upper back, and medial right thigh (P < .003). Measured dose was significantly higher with the standing technique at these sites with the exception of the upper back. Rates of complete response (25% vs 23%), partial response (50% vs 69%), and stable disease (17% vs 8%) were similar between the standing and recumbent cohorts, respectively (P = .78). Conclusions: We have developed, commissioned, and implemented a floor-based, recumbent technique that allows for treatment of patients who would otherwise not be eligible for TSEBT. Dosimetric and clinical measurements suggest that this technique is a viable alternative to the standing method.
Authors
Ackerson, BG; Wu, Q; Craciunescu, O; Oyekunle, T; Niedzwiecki, D; Gupton, J; Laug, P; Brumfield, K; Crain, E; Champ, CE; Kelsey, CR
MLA Citation
Ackerson, Bradley G., et al. “Recumbent Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy.Adv Radiat Oncol, vol. 6, no. 4, July 2021, p. 100698. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.adro.2021.100698.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484270
PMID
34409205
Source
pubmed
Published In
Advances in Radiation Oncology
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
100698
DOI
10.1016/j.adro.2021.100698

Effective Pain Control With Very Low Dose Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Multiple Myeloma With Uncomplicated Osseous Lesions.

BACKGROUND: Osteolytic lesions are present in 75% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and frequently require palliation with radiation therapy (RT). Prior case series of patients with MM with bone pain undergoing palliative RT suggests doses ≥12 Gy (equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions, EQD2) provide excellent bone pain relief. However, recent advances in care and novel biologic agents have significantly improved overall survival and quality of life for patients with MM. We hypothesized that lower-dose RT (LDRT, EQD2 <12 Gy) offers an effective alternative to higher-dose RT (HDRT, EQD2 ≥12 Gy) for palliation of painful, uncomplicated MM bone lesions. METHODS: We retrospectively identified patients with MM treated with RT for uncomplicated, painful bone lesions and stratified by EQD2 ≥/< 12 Gy. Clinical pain response (CPR) rates, acute and late toxicity, pain response duration, and retreatment rates between LDRT and HDRT groups were analyzed. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients with 70 treated lesions were included: 24 patients (48 lesions) treated with HDRT and 11 patients (22 lesions) with LDRT. Median follow-up was 14 and 16.89 months for HDRT and LDRT, respectively. The median dose of HDRT treatment was 20 Gy versus 4 Gy in the LDRT group. The CPR rate was 98% for HDRT and 95% for LDRT. There was no significant difference in any-grade acute toxicity between the HDRT and LDRT cohorts (24.5% vs 9.1%, Χ2 P = .20). Pain recurred in 10% of lesions (12% HDRT vs 9.5% LDRT). Median duration of pain response did not significantly differ between cohorts (P = .91). Five lesions were retreated, 2 (9.5%) in the LDRT cohort, and 3 (6.3%) in the HDRT cohort. CONCLUSION: In this study, LDRT effectively palliated painful, uncomplicated MM bony lesions with acceptable CPR and duration of palliation. These data support prospective comparisons of LDRT versus HDRT for palliation of painful, uncomplicated MM bony lesions.
Authors
Price, JG; Niedzwiecki, D; Oyekunle, T; Arcasoy, MO; Champ, CE; Kelsey, CR; Salama, JK; Moravan, MJ
MLA Citation
Price, Jeremy G., et al. “Effective Pain Control With Very Low Dose Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Multiple Myeloma With Uncomplicated Osseous Lesions.Adv Radiat Oncol, vol. 6, no. 4, July 2021, p. 100729. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.adro.2021.100729.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1488947
PMID
34258474
Source
pubmed
Published In
Advances in Radiation Oncology
Volume
6
Published Date
Start Page
100729
DOI
10.1016/j.adro.2021.100729

Research Areas:

Cutaneous B Cell Lymphoma
Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma
Diet
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Exercise for older people
Exercise therapy for older people
Lymphomas
Metabolism