Jennifer Choe

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Assistant Professor in Head & Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences

Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

MD./PhD. 2011

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Internal Medicine Residency

Baylor College of Medicine

Hematology-Oncology Fellowship, Medicine

Duke University School of Medicine

Grants:

Duke-UNC-Wash U Partnership for Early Phase Clinical Trials in Cancer

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Significant Contributor
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 1 Multiple-Dose Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of XmAb®23104 in Subjects with Selected Advanced Solid Tumors (DUET-3)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Xencor, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Genmab GCT1021-01

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Genmab A/S
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase I, Open-Label, Multicenter Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Anti-Tumor Activity of Ascending Doses of AZD4635 Both as Monotherapy and in Combination with Durvalumab in Patients with Advanced Solid Ma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, LP
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Cabozantinib (XL184) in Subjects with Radioiodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Who Have Progressed after Prior VEGFR-Targeted Therapy

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Exelixis, Inc
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Guiding immunotherapy combinations: Who gets what?

Although PD-1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors have proven successful in a range of malignancies, there are subsets of patients that do not respond to these agents due to upregulation of adaptive and innate resistance mechanisms by the tumor and its surrounding microenvironment. As new immunotherapeutic strategies are developed, there is a need for rational implementation of novel immunotherapy combinations that target complementary mechanisms of immunotherapy resistance intrinsic to each patient and tumor type. In this short review, we cover mechanisms by which tumors evade the immune system, as well as summarize available clinical data on emerging therapeutic agents that target these defense mechanisms. Rational implementation of combination immunotherapy targeting patient- and malignancy-specific immune evasion mechanisms may thus lead to enhanced response rates and allow immunotherapy to be effective even in tumors that are historically considered poorly responsive to immunotherapy.
Authors
Ferreira, MN; Choe, JH
MLA Citation
Ferreira, Michelle N., and Jennifer H. Choe. “Guiding immunotherapy combinations: Who gets what?Adv Drug Deliv Rev, vol. 178, Nov. 2021, p. 113962. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.addr.2021.113962.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1496117
PMID
34481029
Source
pubmed
Published In
Adv Drug Deliv Rev
Volume
178
Published Date
Start Page
113962
DOI
10.1016/j.addr.2021.113962

C3 GLOMERULONEPHRITIS WITH MONOCLONAL GAMMOPATHY OF UNDETERMINED SIGNIFICANCE (MGUS)

Authors
Olivo, RE; Goebel, M; Choe, J; Howell, D; Butterly, D; Roberts, JK
MLA Citation
Olivo, Robert E., et al. “C3 GLOMERULONEPHRITIS WITH MONOCLONAL GAMMOPATHY OF UNDETERMINED SIGNIFICANCE (MGUS).” American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 67, no. 5, W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, 2016, pp. A81–A81.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1150301
Source
wos
Published In
American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Volume
67
Published Date
Start Page
A81
End Page
A81

A phase 1 study of gemcitabine combined with dasatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors.

PURPOSE: Dasatinib has been shown preclinically to overcome resistance to gemcitabine. We evaluated the safety and biological activity of the combination of dasatinib and gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In a phase 1 study (3 + 3 design), patients received daily dasatinib with weekly gemcitabine on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle (except cycle 1 which was 8 weeks). Dose escalation began with dasatinib 70 mg orally (PO) daily and gemcitabine 800 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) weekly. RESULTS: Forty-seven patients (15 men; median age = 55 years; median number of prior systemic treatments = 4) were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 fatigue and dehydration, with the maximum tolerated dose being dasatinib 100 mg PO qd and gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) IV weekly. The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were anemia (21.5 %), thrombocytopenia (26.2 %), leukopenia (26.2 %), and pleural effusion (10.7 %). Six of 47 patients attained stable disease (SD) ≥ 6 months or partial response including 2 of 8 patients with pancreatic cancer (SD ≥ 6 months; both gemcitabine-refractory), 2 of 3 patients with thymoma (SD for 9.8 and 15 months), 1 of 1 patient with anal squamous cancer (SD 15 months) and 1 of 5 patients with inflammatory breast cancer. No significant changes in circulating tumor cells or interleukin-8 levels were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The combination was well tolerated at doses of dasatinib 100 mg PO daily and gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) IV weekly. SD ≥ 6 months/ PR was observed in gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer, thymoma, anal cancer and inflammatory breast cancer.
Authors
Hong, DS; Choe, JH; Naing, A; Wheler, JJ; Falchook, GS; Piha-Paul, S; Moulder, SL; George, GC; Choe, JM; Strauss, LC; Gallick, GE; Kurzrock, R
MLA Citation
Hong, David S., et al. “A phase 1 study of gemcitabine combined with dasatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors.Invest New Drugs, vol. 31, no. 4, Aug. 2013, pp. 918–26. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s10637-012-9898-3.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1469409
PMID
23179336
Source
pubmed
Published In
Invest New Drugs
Volume
31
Published Date
Start Page
918
End Page
926
DOI
10.1007/s10637-012-9898-3

A phase I, open-label, multicenter study to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of AZD4635 both as monotherapy and in combination in patients with advanced solid malignancies: Results from prostate cancer patients (NCT0

Authors
Lim, EA; Bauer, TM; Patel, MR; Falchook, GS; Karlix, JL; Choe, JH; George, DJ; Mugundu, GM; Pilling, E; Chen, H; Linghu, B; McGrath, L; Shao, W; Merchant, MS; Sidders, B; Sachsenmeier, KF; Pouliot, GP; Drake, CG; Bendell, JC
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1467296
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
38
Published Date

Tabelecleucel in combination with pembrolizumab (Pembro) in platinum-pretreated, recurrent/metastatic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (EBV+NPC).

<jats:p> TPS6092 </jats:p><jats:p> Background: Approximately 25% of patients (pts) with NPC develop RM disease, which has a poor prognosis (median overall survival [mOS]: 12–16 mo), despite standard treatments with radiation and/or chemotherapy. NPC is an EBV-associated cancer in which programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression is upregulated upon EBV activation. Pembro showed antitumor activity in a phase 1b study of pts with RM-NPC (objective response rate [ORR]: 26%; mOS: 16.5 mo) (Hsu, J Clin Oncol 2017;35:4050-56). Targeting RM EBV+ NPC with tab-cel immunotherapy (off-the-shelf, allogeneic EBV-specific T cells) in pts has also shown promise, with 2-yr OS rates of 84% (Prockop, ASCO 2016;34:3012). The favorable safety profile of tab-cel offers the opportunity for combination immunotherapy with pembro for increased efficacy. Methods: This multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase 1b/2 study evaluates safety and efficacy of tab-cel in combination with pembro. Study participants are ≥12 yrs of age with incurable, locally recurrent or metastatic EBV+<jats:sup /> NPC previously treated with platinum-containing therapy. Pts are checkpoint-inhibitor naïve (phase 1b/2) or refractory to anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapy (phase 1b). Tab-cel is selected from a bank based on matching ≥2 HLA alleles, including ≥1 restricting HLA allele, between pts and donors. Tab-cel will be administered intravenously (IV) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 21-day cycle. Initial tab-cel dose is 2x10<jats:sup>6</jats:sup> cells/kg and the de-escalated tab-cel dose (if needed) is 1x10<jats:sup>6</jats:sup> cells/kg. Pembro is administered at 200 mg IV Q3W in adults and 2 mg/kg IV Q3W in pts aged 12 to 17 yrs. Primary outcomes of phase 1b are to characterize dose-limiting toxicities, identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or in the absence of MTD, the recommended phase 2 dose, and assess safety. Primary outcomes for phase 2 are ORR and safety. Secondary endpoints include progression-free survival, OS, and duration of response. Enrollment is ongoing for 12-24 participants in the phase 1b portion of the study with a 6+6 design. Phase 2 is expected to enroll 36 pts. Clinical trial information: NCT03769467. </jats:p>
Authors
Siu, LL; Bauml, J; Adkins, D; Colevas, AD; Perez, CA; Choe, JH; Zhang, Y; Shi, W; Navarro, WH; Haigentz, M; Rabinowits, G; Pfister, DG
MLA Citation
Siu, Lillian L., et al. “Tabelecleucel in combination with pembrolizumab (Pembro) in platinum-pretreated, recurrent/metastatic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma (EBV+NPC).Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 37, no. 15_suppl, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), 2019, pp. TPS6092–TPS6092. Crossref, doi:10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.tps6092.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1415394
Source
crossref
Published In
Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume
37
Published Date
Start Page
TPS6092
End Page
TPS6092
DOI
10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.tps6092