Taewoong Choi

Overview:

Based on my prior experience in basic/translational immunology research and clinical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, I am interested in early phase clinical protocols for novel immunotherapy of hematologic malignancies.

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2002

Seoul National University (South Korea)

Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine

St. Luke's Memorial Hospital Center

Hematology/Oncology Fellowship

University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

BMT Fellowship

Stanford University, School of Medicine

Postdoctoral Research Fellow on T32 Training Grant

Stanford University, School of Medicine

Grants:

Prospective, Multicenter, Open-Label, Single Arm, Phase 2 Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Defibrotide in the Prevention of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-T-cell-associated Neurotoxicity in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Jazz Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of BB2121 Versus Standard Triplet Regimens in Subjects with Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM) (KARMMa-3)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Celgene Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase I, Open-Label, Multi-Center, Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of NKTR-255 as a single agent in relapsed or refractory hematological malignancies and in combgination with Daratumumab as a Salvage Regimen for Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Nektar Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Long Term Follow-up Protocol for Subjects Treated with Gene-Modified T Cells

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Celgene Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3 Randomized Study Comparing JNJ-68284528, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) Therapy Directed Against BCMA, versus Pomalidomide, Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (PVd) or Daratumumab, Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone (DPd)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Janssen Research & Development, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation with Omidubicel: Long-Term Follow-Up from a Single Center

Authors
Lin, C; Morrison, L; Alyea, E; Choi, T; Gasparetto, C; Long, G; Lopez, R; Rizzieri, D; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, A; Chao, N; Galamidi-Cohen, E; Schwarzbach, A; Horwitz, M
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1500352
Source
manual
Published Date

Association Between Kidney Function, Proteinuria and the Risk of Multiple Myeloma: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in South Korea.

Purpose: While renal impairment is one of the first clinical manifestations of multiple myeloma (MM), declined renal function may conversely be a risk factor for cancers including MM. In this study, we investigated the relationship between chronic kidney disease and MM at a population level. Materials and Methods: A total of 9,809,376 adults who participated in a nationwide health screening program and had no MM, cancer or end-stage renal disease at baseline were investigated for incidence of MM. The impact of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and random urine dipstick proteinuria, and interactive associations of the two factors on the MM incidence were evaluated. Results: The general incidence of MM was 4.8 per 100,000 person-years (mean follow-up of 8.3 years). Participants with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2 (5.8% of participants) had higher MM incidence than those with eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73m2 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.43). When eGFR was graded into five levels, there was a significant inverse dose-response relationship between eGFR level and MM incidence at the lower eGFR levels (reference: eGFR 60-89 mL/min/1.73m2). A dose-response relationship was also found with degree of dipstick proteinuria and incidence of MM. Conclusion: Adults with decreased renal function indicated either by decreased eGFR or presence of proteinuria are at a higher risk of developing MM compared to those without, and there is a dose-response relationship between the severity of renal impairment and MM incidence.
Authors
Choi, T; Ahn, W; Shin, DW; Han, K; Kim, D; Chun, S
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1498189
PMID
34583456
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Res Treat
Published Date
DOI
10.4143/crt.2021.951

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma.

Although treatment outcomes of multiple myeloma patients have improved significantly during the last two decades, myeloma is still an incurable disease. There are newly emerging immunotherapies to treat multiple myeloma including monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugate, bispecific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy. Impressive response rate and clinical efficacy in heavily pretreated myeloma patients led to the FDA approval of the first myeloma CAR-T therapy in March 2021. Among many different targets for myeloma CAR-T therapies, B Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) has been the most successful target so far, but other targets which can be used either for single-target or dual-target CAR-T's are actively being explored. Clinical efficacy and safety of current myeloma CAR-T therapies will be presented here. Potential mechanisms leading to resistance include clearance of CAR-T cells, antigenic escape, and immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Novel strategies to enhance myeloma CAR-T will also be described. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the current data and the future directions of myeloma CAR-T therapies.
Authors
MLA Citation
Choi, Taewoong, and Yubin Kang. “Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma.Pharmacol Ther, Sept. 2021, p. 108007. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2021.108007.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497860
PMID
34582835
Source
pubmed
Published In
Pharmacol Ther
Published Date
Start Page
108007
DOI
10.1016/j.pharmthera.2021.108007

Obesity-Independent Association between Glycemic Status and the Risk of Hematologic Malignancy: A Nationwide Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort Study.

There have been conflicting results regarding the association between diabetes and the risk of hematologic malignancies, and its interaction with obesity is unknown. This study determined the risk of hematologic malignancies according to the glycemic status in a population-based study involving health screening 9,774,625 participants. The baseline glycemic status of the participants was categorized into no diabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), newly detected diabetes, diabetes duration <5 years, and diabetes duration ≥5 year groups. The risks of overall and specific hematologic malignancies were estimated using a Cox regression analysis. During a median follow up of 7.3 years, 14,733 hematologic malignancies developed. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for the risk of all the hematologic malignancies was 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.02) for IFG, 0.99 (95% CI 0.91-1.08) for newly detected diabetes, 1.03 (95% CI 0.96-1.11) for diabetes duration <5 years, and 1.11 (95% CI 1.03, 1.20) for diabetes duration ≥5 year groups. The association was independent from obesity. The risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) increased according to the progression of dysglycemia towards a longer diabetes duration, while Hodgkin's lymphoma did not. This study in Korea demonstrated diabetes to be associated with an increased risk of hematologic malignancies independent of obesity. The NHL risk increased with the diabetes duration.
Authors
Kang, J; Jin, S-M; Kim, SJ; Kim, D; Han, K; Jeong, S-M; Chang, J; Rhee, SY; Choi, T; Shin, DW
MLA Citation
Kang, Jihun, et al. “Obesity-Independent Association between Glycemic Status and the Risk of Hematologic Malignancy: A Nationwide Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort Study.Cancers (Basel), vol. 13, no. 19, Sept. 2021. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/cancers13194760.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1497895
PMID
34638244
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancers
Volume
13
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/cancers13194760

Female Sex Is Associated with Improved Long-Term Survival Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Life expectancy for long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), defined as those living ≥5 years post-transplantation, is significantly lower compared with that of the age-matched general population despite a relatively low primary disease relapse rate at >2 years post-transplantation. Among several factors, patient sex is increasingly recognized as a prognostic indicator of long-term survival. We examined the influence of patient sex and donor-recipient sex matching on overall survival (OS) in a landmark analysis of long-term survivors. Using our institutional database supplemented with individual patient record review, we retrospectively investigated the relative influence of recipient sex and donor-recipient sex matching on outcomes of long-term survivors of alloHSCT between 1994 and 2014. Over this 20-year period, 247 met inclusion criteria for analysis; males and females had similar demographic and treatment characteristics. However, significantly more deaths after the 5-year landmark occurred in male recipients. Interestingly, donor sex did not have a significant impact on OS in multivariate analysis, and differences in OS of donor-recipient sex pairs was driven by recipient sex. In addition to recipient sex, only chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) retained significance as a covariate with an impact on OS in multivariate analysis. Men experienced slightly higher, but statistically nonsignificant, rates and increased severity of cGVHD, and had higher cGVHD-related mortality compared with females. In this long-term survival analysis of adult alloHSCT recipients, one of the only to include follow-up to 15 years, our results show that women survive significantly longer than men irrespective of their age at transplantation. This outcome is independent of other common pretransplantation prognostic indicators, such as donor sex or performance status at transplantation. The inferior survival in males is consistent with survival outcomes described in the transplantation literature. Increasing evidence suggests a biological basis for long-term sex-determined outcomes, possibly owing to differing rates or severity of cGVHD or sustained alloimmune tolerance in females. Larger studies are warranted to validate these retrospective clinical results.
Authors
Islam, P; Tang, H; Jin, H; Cao, F; Bohannon, LM; Ren, Y; Chao, NJ; Choi, T; Gasparetto, C; Horwitz, ME; Long, GD; Lopez, RD; Rizzieri, DA; Sarantopoulos, S; Sung, AD
MLA Citation
Islam, Prioty, et al. “Female Sex Is Associated with Improved Long-Term Survival Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.Transplant Cell Ther, vol. 27, no. 9, Sept. 2021, pp. 784.e1-784.e7. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtct.2021.06.012.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1485675
PMID
34146734
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transplant Cell Ther
Volume
27
Published Date
Start Page
784.e1
End Page
784.e7
DOI
10.1016/j.jtct.2021.06.012

Research Areas:

Cellular therapy
Immunotherapy
Multiple Myeloma
Plasma cell diseases
Stem Cell Transplantation