Taewoong Choi

Overview:

Based on my prior experience in basic/translational immunology research and clinical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, I am interested in early phase clinical protocols for novel immunotherapy of hematologic malignancies.

Positions:

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapy
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 2002

Seoul National University (South Korea)

Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine

St. Luke's Memorial Hospital Center

Hematology/Oncology Fellowship

University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

BMT Fellowship

Stanford University, School of Medicine

Postdoctoral Research Fellow on T32 Training Grant

Stanford University, School of Medicine

Grants:

Prospective, Multicenter, Open-Label, Single Arm, Phase 2 Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Defibrotide in the Prevention of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-T-cell-associated Neurotoxicity in Subjects with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Jazz Pharmaceuticals
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of BB2121 Versus Standard Triplet Regimens in Subjects with Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma (RRMM) (KARMMa-3)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Celgene Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase I, Open-Label, Multi-Center, Dose Escalation and Dose Expansion Study of NKTR-255 as a single agent in relapsed or refractory hematological malignancies and in combgination with Daratumumab as a Salvage Regimen for Multiple Myeloma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Nektar Therapeutics
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Long Term Follow-up Protocol for Subjects Treated with Gene-Modified T Cells

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Celgene Corporation
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A Phase 3 Randomized Study Comparing JNJ-68284528, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) Therapy Directed Against BCMA, versus Pomalidomide, Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (PVd) or Daratumumab, Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone (DPd)

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Awarded By
Janssen Research & Development, LLC
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Provides Durable Disease Control in Patients with Double-Hit Lymphoma

Authors
Choi, T; Kodali, MK; Weng, W-K
MLA Citation
Choi, Taewoong, et al. “Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Provides Durable Disease Control in Patients with Double-Hit Lymphoma.” Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, vol. 23, no. 3, 2017, pp. S213–14.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506442
Source
wos-lite
Published In
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation : Journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
S213
End Page
S214

Geriatric Assessment Reveals Actionable Impairments in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Candidates Age 18 to 80 Years.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is a potentially curative treatment for both malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases; however, reported rates of treatment-related mortality approach 30%. Outcomes are worse in patients who begin HCT with functional impairments. To detect such impairments, a geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended in adults age ≥65 years. Younger HCT candidates also may be impaired because of chemotherapy regimens pre-HCT. Therefore, we hypothesized that GA can be beneficial for adult patients of all ages and subsequently created a clinical pretransplantation optimization program to assess all HCT candidates using a modified GA. One-hundred fifty-seven patients were evaluated in 4 functional domains- physical, cognitive, nutritional, and psychological-at 2 time points prior to HCT-new patient evaluation (NPE) and sign-off (SO)-between October 2017 and January 2020. At NPE, 80.9% of the patients had at least 1 domain with a functional impairment, and physical (P = .006), cognitive (P = .04), and psychological (P = .04) impairments were associated with an increased likelihood of not proceeding to HCT. In addition, patients age 18 to 39 years were more likely than older patients to have a physical function impairment (P = .001). Between NPE and SO, 51.9% of the patients had resolution of 1 or more impairments, and nutritional impairment at SO was predictive of worse overall survival (P = .01). Our study shows that GA can identify functional impairments in patients of all ages. Early identification of impairments could facilitate referrals to supportive care and resolution of impairments prior to HCT, suggesting that GA could be recommended for HCT candidates of all ages.
Authors
Lew, MV; Ren, Y; Lowder, YP; Siamakpour-Reihani, S; Ramalingam, S; Romero, KM; Thompson, JC; Bohannon, LM; McIntyre, J; Tang, H; Van Opstal, J; Johnson, E; Cohen, HJ; Bartlett, DB; Pastva, AM; Morey, M; Hall, KS; Smith, P; Peters, KB; Somers, TJ; Kelleher, S; Smith, SK; Wischmeyer, PE; Lin, P-H; Wood, WA; Thorpe, G; Minor, K; Wiggins, K; Hennig, T; Helms, T; Welch, R; Matthews, B; Liu, J; Burleson, J; Aberant, T; Engemann, AK; Henshall, B; Darby, M; Proch, C; Dellascio, M; Pittman, A; Suminguit, J; Choi, T; Gasparetto, C; Long, GD; Lopez, RD; Sarantopoulos, S; Horwitz, ME; Chao, NJ; Sung, AD
MLA Citation
Lew, Meagan V., et al. “Geriatric Assessment Reveals Actionable Impairments in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Candidates Age 18 to 80 Years.Transplant Cell Ther, vol. 28, no. 8, Aug. 2022, pp. 498.e1-498.e9. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtct.2022.05.018.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1521437
PMID
35595226
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transplant Cell Ther
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
498.e1
End Page
498.e9
DOI
10.1016/j.jtct.2022.05.018

Association between Cholesterol Level and the Risk of Hematologic Malignancy According to Menopausal Status: A Korean Nationwide Cohort Study.

Recent studies have revealed the possible association between serum cholesterol levels and hematologic malignancy (HM). However, limited information is available about how reproductive factors interact with this association. Therefore, we investigated the roles of serum cholesterol in the risk of HM according to the menopausal status. We finally identified 1,189,806 premenopausal and 1,621,604 postmenopausal women who underwent a national health screening program in 2009 using data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. Overall, 5449 (0.19%) developed HM. Among postmenopausal women, the inverse associations were observed between total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, and the risk of overall HM. In premenopausal women, the highest quartile of HDL-C was associated with a reduced risk of HM compared with the lowest quartile of HDL-C consistent with results in postmenopausal women (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.68-0.95]), whereas the highest quartile of triglyceride (TG) showed an increased risk of HM compared to the lowest quartile of TG, (aHR 1.22, 95% CI [1.02,1.44]) only in premenopausal women. Our finding suggests that lipid profiles are differently associated with HM risk by menopausal status.
Authors
Jung, W; Jeon, KH; Kang, J; Choi, T; Han, K; Jin, S-M; Jeong, S-M; Shin, DW
MLA Citation
Jung, Wonyoung, et al. “Association between Cholesterol Level and the Risk of Hematologic Malignancy According to Menopausal Status: A Korean Nationwide Cohort Study.Biomedicines, vol. 10, no. 7, July 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/biomedicines10071617.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1526396
PMID
35884921
Source
pubmed
Published In
Biomedicines
Volume
10
Published Date
DOI
10.3390/biomedicines10071617

Home-Based Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in the United States.

Patients undergoing allogeneic (allo) and autologous (auto) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) require extensive hospitalizations or daily clinic visits for the duration of their transplantation. Home HCT, wherein patients live at home and providers make daily trips to the patient's residence to perform assessments and deliver any necessary interventions, may enhance patient quality of life and improve outcomes. We conducted the first study of home HCT in the United States to evaluate this model in the US healthcare setting and to determine the effect on clinical outcomes and quality of life. This case-control study evaluated patients who received home HCT at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, from November 2012 to March 2018. Each home HCT patient was matched with 2 controls from the same institution who had received standard treatment based on age, disease, and type of transplant for outcomes comparison. Clinical outcomes were abstracted from electronic health records, and quality of life was assessed via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant. Clinical outcomes were compared with Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test (continuous variables) or chi-square test (categorical variables). Quality of life scores were compared using the Student t-test. All analyses used a significance threshold of 0.05. Twenty-five patients received home HCT, including 8 allos and 17 autos. Clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the home HCT patients and their matched controls; home HCT patients had decreased incidence of relapse within 1 year of transplantation. Pre-HCT quality of life was well preserved for autologous home HCT patients. This Phase I study demonstrated that home HCT can be successfully implemented in the United States. There was no evidence that home HCT outcomes were inferior to standard-of-care treatment, and patients undergoing autologous home HCT were able to maintain their quality of life. A Phase II randomized trial of home versus standard HCT is currently underway to better compare outcomes and costs.
Authors
Sung, AD; Giri, VK; Tang, H; Nichols, KR; Lew, MV; Bohannon, L; Ren, Y; Jung, S-H; Dalton, T; Bush, A; Van Opstal, J; Artica, A; Messina, J; Shelby, R; Frith, J; Lassiter, M; Burleson, J; Leonard, K; Potter, AS; Choi, T; Gasparetto, CJ; Horwitz, ME; Long, GD; Lopez, RD; Sarantopoulos, S; Chao, NJ
MLA Citation
Sung, Anthony D., et al. “Home-Based Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in the United States.Transplant Cell Ther, vol. 28, no. 4, Apr. 2022, pp. 207.e1-207.e8. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtct.2022.01.015.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1506925
PMID
35066211
Source
pubmed
Published In
Transplant Cell Ther
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
207.e1
End Page
207.e8
DOI
10.1016/j.jtct.2022.01.015

Associations between Alcohol Consumption Patterns and Risk of Multiple Myeloma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in South Korea.

BACKGROUND: Among the potential modifiable risk factors, the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of multiple myeloma remains controversial. We investigated the effects of weekly average alcohol consumption and drinking pattern on the risk of multiple myeloma using a nationwide representative database. METHODS: We identified 11,737,467 subjects who participated in the Korean National Health Screening Program in 2009 and 2010. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the risk of multiple myeloma according to weekly alcohol consumption, drinking frequency, and amount per session. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 6.8 years after a one-year time lag, 6,981 subjects (3,921 men and 3,060 women) were diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Compared with nondrinkers, all drinkers were at a significantly lower risk for multiple myeloma. The risk of multiple myeloma was reduced in a dose-dependent manner: mild drinkers [adjusted HR (aHR), 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84-0.95], moderate drinkers (aHR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.91), and heavy drinkers (aHR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69-0.85). Furthermore, both drinking frequency and amount per drinking session showed inverse association with the risk of multiple myeloma. CONCLUSIONS: Our large population-based study suggested an inverse dose-dependent association between total average alcohol consumption and the risk of multiple myeloma, and drinking frequency and amount per drinking session seemed to not differ in their relative contribution to the risk of multiple myeloma. IMPACT: On the basis of the unprecedentedly large number of study population analyzed in this study, our study provides solid epidemiologic evidence of alcohol consumption on multiple myeloma risk.
Authors
Jeon, KH; Jeong, S-M; Shin, DW; Han, K; Kim, D; Yoo, JE; Choi, T
MLA Citation
Jeon, Keun Hye, et al. “Associations between Alcohol Consumption Patterns and Risk of Multiple Myeloma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in South Korea.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, vol. 31, no. 3, Mar. 2022, pp. 670–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-21-0904.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1504938
PMID
34937793
Source
pubmed
Published In
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume
31
Published Date
Start Page
670
End Page
678
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-21-0904

Research Areas:

Cellular therapy
Immunotherapy
Multiple Myeloma
Plasma cell diseases
Stem Cell Transplantation