Jeffrey Crawford

Overview:

1. Lung cancer/new treatment approaches.
2. Clinical trials of hematopoietic growth factors, biological agents and targeted drug development.
3. Cancer in the elderly and supportive care

Accomplishments

1. Lead Investigator of the U. S. multicenter, randomized trial of Filgrastim (G-CSF, Neupogen) to reduce the morbidity of chemotherapy-related neutropenia, leading to FDA approval 2/91.
2. Lead Investigator of the U. S. multicenter, randomized trial of Vinorelbine (Navelbine) in treatment of patients with advanced non small cell carcinoma of lung (NSCLC), leading to FDA approval 12/94.
3. Principal Investigator in initial phase I clinical trials of stem cell factor (SCF), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), pegylated granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and other novel hematopoietic growth factors.

Positions:

George Barth Geller Distinguished Professor

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Professor of Medicine

Medicine, Medical Oncology
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1974

Ohio State University

Grants:

BR.31

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

HELSINN - ANAM-17-21

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

A phase II, Open-label, single-arm study to assess the safety and efficacy of AZD9291 in patients with locally advanced/

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Phase II anetumab ravtansine as 2nd line treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma

Administered By
Duke Cancer Institute
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

EMD Serono, Inc. Education Event

Administered By
Medicine, Medical Oncology
Role
Principal Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Third CECOG consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

The current third consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) builds upon and updates similar publications on the subject by the Central European Cooperative Oncology Group (CECOG), which has published such consensus statements in the years 2002 and 2005 (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer-update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137). The principle of all CECOG consensus is such that evidence-based recommendations for state-of-the-art treatment are given upon which all participants and authors of the manuscript have to agree (Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). This is of particular importance in diseases in which treatment options depend on very particular clinical and biologic variables (Zielinski CC, Beinert T, Crawford J et al. Consensus on medical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer-update 2004. Lung Cancer 2005; 50: 129-137; Beslija S, Bonneterre J, Burstein HJ et al. Third consensus on medical treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ann Oncol 2009; 20 (11): 1771-1785). Since the publication of the last CECOG consensus on the medical treatment of NSCLC, a series of diagnostic tools for the characterization of biomarkers for personalized therapy for NSCLC as well as therapeutic options including adjuvant treatment, targeted therapy, and maintenance treatment have emerged and strongly influenced the field. Thus, the present third consensus was generated that not only readdresses previous disease-related issues but also expands toward recent developments in the management of NSCLC. It is the aim of the present consensus to summarize minimal quality-oriented requirements for individual patients with NSCLC in its various stages based upon levels of evidence in the light of a rapidly expanding array of individual therapeutic options.
Authors
Brodowicz, T; Ciuleanu, T; Crawford, J; Filipits, M; Fischer, JR; Georgoulias, V; Gridelli, C; Hirsch, FR; Jassem, J; Kosmidis, P; Krzakowski, M; Manegold, C; Pujol, JL; Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Vansteenkiste, J; Minichsdorfer, C; Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Zielinski, CC; Central European Cooperative Oncology Group (CECOG),
MLA Citation
Brodowicz, T., et al. “Third CECOG consensus on the systemic treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.Ann Oncol, vol. 23, no. 5, May 2012, pp. 1223–29. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/annonc/mdr381.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1431764
PMID
32018580
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Oncol
Volume
23
Published Date
Start Page
1223
End Page
1229
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdr381

Therapeutic outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer with BRAF mutations: a single institution, retrospective cohort study.

Background: Data describing therapeutic outcomes in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with BRAF mutations remains limited. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 31 patients with metastatic NSCLC treated at Duke University Hospital who had been identified by next-generation sequencing methods to bear a BRAF mutation in their tumor in order to evaluate clinical response to immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Results: Sixty-five percent of patients identified in this cohort were current or former smokers. Fourteen (45.2%) of patients had a BRAF V600E mutation and 17 (54.8%) had a non-V600E mutation. Median progression-free survival (PFS) in the 23 patients who received first-line chemotherapy was 6.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3 to 13.0]. Overall survival (OS) in patients who received first-line chemotherapy showed a median survival of 18 months (95% CI, 7.4 to 28.6). OS comparing patients who had never received immunotherapy at any point was 18.4 months (95% CI, 4.1 to NE) compared to 19.0 months (95% CI, 9.9 to 28.6) in those who had received immunotherapy. We did not find a statistically significant difference in OS in patients with BRAF V600E, BRAF amplification, or non-V600E mutations. There was also no difference in OS in patients treated with targeted BRAF inhibitors compared to those who were not treated with targeted BRAF inhibitors. Conclusions: We describe therapeutic outcomes for patients with metastatic NSCLC with BRAF mutations treated with either cytotoxic chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Although the sample size is small, the survival curves do not suggest improved clinical activity in this population when treated with immunotherapy.
Authors
Tan, I; Stinchcombe, TE; Ready, NE; Crawford, J; Datto, MB; Nagy, RJ; Lanman, RB; Gu, L; Clarke, JM
MLA Citation
Tan, Irena, et al. “Therapeutic outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer with BRAF mutations: a single institution, retrospective cohort study.Transl Lung Cancer Res, vol. 8, no. 3, June 2019, pp. 258–67. Pubmed, doi:10.21037/tlcr.2019.04.03.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1397860
PMID
31367539
Source
pubmed
Published In
Translational Lung Cancer Research
Volume
8
Published Date
Start Page
258
End Page
267
DOI
10.21037/tlcr.2019.04.03

Relative dose intensity of first-line chemotherapy and overall survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

PURPOSE:The effects of chemotherapy dose intensity on survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poorly understood. We retrospectively analyzed dose delays/reduction, relative dose intensity (RDI), and the association between chemotherapy intensity and survival in advanced NSCLC. METHODS:This retrospective cohort study included adults with advanced lung cancer who received first-line myelosuppressive platinum-based chemotherapy (January 2007-December 2010) in ~ 230 US Oncology Network community practices. Dose delays ≥ 7 days, dose reductions ≥ 15%, and RDI relative to standard regimens were described. Overall survival (OS) was measured using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard (PH) models. RESULTS:Among 3866 patients with advanced NSCLC, 32.4% experienced dose delays ≥ 7 days, 50.1% experienced dose reductions ≥ 15%, and 40.4% had RDI < 85%. Reduced RDI was also common regardless of baseline ECOG PS (ECOG PS ≥ 2, 56.2%; ECOG PS 0, 33.6%) and tumor subgroup (squamous cell carcinoma, 52.2%; adenocarcinoma, 36.0%). When stratified by chemotherapy intensity measures, significant OS differences were observed only for dose delays. Median (95% CI) OS was 1.02 years (0.96-1.12) for dose delays ≥ 7 days and 0.71 years (0.66-0.77) for dose delays < 7 days. In multivariable Cox PH analysis, dose delays ≥ 7 days (HR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.63-0.80) and RDI ≥ 85% (HR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.05-1.32) were significantly associated with decreased mortality. CONCLUSIONS:Dose delays, dose reductions, and reduced RDI were common, and dose delays ≥ 7 days and high RDI were significantly associated with decreased mortality. These results can help identify potential risk factors and characterize the effect of chemotherapy dose modification strategies on mortality.
Authors
Crawford, J; Denduluri, N; Patt, D; Jiao, X; Morrow, PK; Garcia, J; Barron, R; Lyman, GH
MLA Citation
Crawford, Jeffrey, et al. “Relative dose intensity of first-line chemotherapy and overall survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 28, no. 2, 2020, pp. 925–32. Epmc, doi:10.1007/s00520-019-04875-1.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1288328
PMID
31172284
Source
epmc
Published In
Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Volume
28
Published Date
Start Page
925
End Page
932
DOI
10.1007/s00520-019-04875-1

Patterns of Failure After Surgery for Non-Small-cell Lung Cancer Invading the Chest Wall.

INTRODUCTION: The patterns of failure after resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) invading the chest wall are not well documented, and the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is unclear, prompting the present analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present institutional review board-approved study evaluated patients who had undergone surgery from 1995 to 2014 for localized NSCLC invading the chest wall. Patients with superior sulcus tumors were excluded. The clinical outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. The prognostic factors were assessed using a multivariate analysis, and the patterns of failure were scored. RESULTS: Seventy-four patients were evaluated. Most patients had undergone lobectomy or pneumonectomy (85%) with en bloc chest wall resection (80%) and had pathologically node negative findings (81%). The surgical margins were positive in 10 patients (14%) and most commonly involved the chest wall (7 of 10). Adjuvant treatment included RT in 21 (28%) and chemotherapy in 28 (38%). A total of 24 local recurrences developed. The chest wall was a component of local disease recurrence in 19 of 24 cases (79%). The local control rate at 5 years for the entire population was 60% (95% confidence interval, 46%-74%). The local control rate was 74% with adjuvant RT versus 55% without RT (P = .43). On multivariate analysis, only resection less than lobectomy or pneumonectomy was associated with worse local control. The overall survival rate was 38% with RT versus 34% without RT (P = .59). CONCLUSION: Positive surgical margins and local disease recurrence were common after resection of NSCLC invading the chest wall. The primary pattern of failure was local recurrence in the chest wall. Adjuvant RT was not associated with improved local control or survival.
Authors
MLA Citation
Tandberg, Daniel J., et al. “Patterns of Failure After Surgery for Non-Small-cell Lung Cancer Invading the Chest Wall.Clin Lung Cancer, vol. 18, no. 4, July 2017, pp. e259–65. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.cllc.2016.11.008.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1161895
PMID
27965012
Source
pubmed
Published In
Clin Lung Cancer
Volume
18
Published Date
Start Page
e259
End Page
e265
DOI
10.1016/j.cllc.2016.11.008

Toxicity of definitive and post-operative radiation following ipilimumab in non-small cell lung cancer.

To determine the feasibility and toxicity of radiation therapy, delivered either as definitive treatment or following surgery, following neo-adjuvant immune checkpoint inhibition for locally advanced NSCLC sixteen patients who received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including ipilimumab as part of a phase II study were identified. Patients were analyzed by intent of radiation and toxicity graded based on CTCAE 4.0. There were seven patients identified who received definitive radiation and nine who received post-operative radiation. There was no grade 3 or greater toxicity in the definitive treatment group although one patient stopped treatment early due to back pain secondary to progression outside of the treatment field. In the post-operative treatment group, one patient required a one week break due to grade 2 odynophagia and no grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. In this study of radiation as definitive or post-operative treatment following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including ipilimumab for locally advanced NSCLC was feasible and well tolerated with limited toxicity.
Authors
Boyer, MJ; Gu, L; Wang, X; Kelsey, CR; Yoo, DS; Onaitis, MW; Dunphy, FR; Crawford, J; Ready, NE; Salama, JK
MLA Citation
Boyer, Matthew J., et al. “Toxicity of definitive and post-operative radiation following ipilimumab in non-small cell lung cancer.Lung Cancer, vol. 98, Aug. 2016, pp. 76–78. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.05.014.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1134977
PMID
27393510
Source
pubmed
Published In
Lung Cancer
Volume
98
Published Date
Start Page
76
End Page
78
DOI
10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.05.014