Thomas D'Amico

Overview:

Lung Cancer

1.Role of molecular markers in the prognosis and therapy of lung cancer
2.Genomic analysis lung cancer mutations


Esophageal Cancer

1.Role of molecular markers in the prognosis and therapy of esophageal cancer
2.Genomic analysis esophageal cancer mutations

Positions:

Gary Hock Distinguished Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
School of Medicine

Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

Columbia University

Grants:

Genetics, Inflammation & Post-op Cognitive Dysfunction

Administered By
Anesthesiology, Cardiothoracic
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Japanese Oncology Group 0802: Another giant leap.

Authors
MLA Citation
D’Amico, Thomas A. “Japanese Oncology Group 0802: Another giant leap.J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, Oct. 2022. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2022.09.060.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1557042
PMID
36376119
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2022.09.060

The Impact of Adjuvant Hemithoracic Radiation on Outcomes in Patients with Stage I-III Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A Dual Registry Analysis.

BACKGROUND: The outcomes associated with receipt of adjuvant radiation in patients following surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to use two registries to compare the outcomes of patients receiving adjuvant radiation or no radiation following definitive surgery for pathologic stage I-III MPM. METHODS: Patients with resected pathologic stage I-III MPM were identified from the Duke University registry (1996-2016) and National Cancer Database (2004-2015). The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Propensity score-matched and landmark subgroup analyses were performed. A total of 212 institutional and 1615 NCDB patients met criteria. In both cohorts, patients who underwent radiation were more likely to have margin-negative resection and more advanced pathologic stage. At a landmark time of 4.4 and 4.7 months from surgery, Duke (HR 1.14; 95%CI 0.62-2.11) and NCDB patients (HR 0.97; 95%CI 0.81-1.17) who received adjuvant radiation did not experience improved survival compared to those who did not receive radiation in multivariable analysis. Duke patients who received radiation had similar incidence of recurrence and time to both overall recurrence and ipsilateral recurrence (HR 0.87; 95%CI 0.43-1.77) compared to those who did not. Duke patients experienced 100 grade 1/2, 21 grade 3/4, and one grade 5 toxicity events during radiation. CONCLUSION: In this dual registry analysis of patients with resected stage I-III MPM, the receipt of adjuvant hemithoracic radiation was not associated with improved survival compared to no radiation.
Authors
Raman, V; Voigt, SL; Jawitz, OK; Farrow, NE; Rhodin, KE; Yang, C-FJ; Tong, BC; D'Amico, TA; Harpole, DH
MLA Citation
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1484315
PMID
34091506
Source
pubmed
Published In
Ann Surg
Published Date
DOI
10.1097/SLA.0000000000004976

Induction Therapy or Upfront Surgery? The Debate Rages On: Reply.

Authors
Rhodin, KE; Raman, V; D'Amico, TA
MLA Citation
Rhodin, Kristen E., et al. “Induction Therapy or Upfront Surgery? The Debate Rages On: Reply.Ann Thorac Surg, vol. 111, no. 6, June 2021, pp. 2085–86. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.11.086.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1474602
PMID
33621551
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume
111
Published Date
Start Page
2085
End Page
2086
DOI
10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.11.086

Perioperative Outcomes and Survival After Preoperative Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

BACKGROUND: Although preoperative immunotherapy is increasingly utilized for non-small cell lung cancer, there remains a paucity of robust clinical data on its safety and long-term survival. Our objective was to evaluate the perioperative outcomes and survival associated with immunotherapy followed by surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: Outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent lung resection after preoperative chemotherapy with or without radiation or immunotherapy (with or without chemotherapy or chemoradiation) in the National Cancer Database (2010 to 2017) were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis, multivariable logistic regression, multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis, and propensity score-matched analysis. RESULTS: From 2010 to 2017, 236 patients (2.2%) received immunotherapy and 10 715 patients received preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery. There were no significant differences between the immunotherapy and preoperative chemotherapy groups with regard to margin positivity (8.5% [n = 20] vs 7.5% [n = 715], P = .98), 30-day readmission (4.2% [n = 10] vs 4.1% [n = 440], P = .87), and 30-day mortality (0.4% [n = 1] vs 2.4% [n = 253], P = .25). The immunotherapy and preoperative chemotherapy groups had similar overall survival (5-year survival 63% [95% confidence interval, 50% to 74%] vs 51% [95% confidence interval, 50% to 52%], log rank P = .06; multivariable adjusted hazard ratio 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 1.41; P = .90). A propensity score matched analysis of 344 patients, well matched by preoperative characteristics, showed no significant differences in short-term outcomes and overall survival (log rank P = 1.00) between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: In this national analysis, preoperative immunotherapy followed by surgery for non-small cell lung cancer was found to be safe and feasible with similar short-term outcomes and overall survival when compared with preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery.
Authors
Mayne, NR; Potter, AL; Bharol, K; Darling, AJ; Raman, V; Cao, C; Li, X; D'Amico, TA; Jeffrey Yang, C-F
MLA Citation
Mayne, Nicholas R., et al. “Perioperative Outcomes and Survival After Preoperative Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Ann Thorac Surg, vol. 113, no. 6, June 2022, pp. 1811–20. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.06.058.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1489781
PMID
34314692
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume
113
Published Date
Start Page
1811
End Page
1820
DOI
10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.06.058

The Impact of Extended Delayed Surgery for Indolent Lung Cancer or Part-Solid Ground Glass Nodules.

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with lung cancer may experience treatment delays. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of extended treatment delays on survival among patients with stage I typical bronchopulmonary carcinoid (BC), lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA) or invasive adenocarcinoma with a lepidic component (ADL). METHODS: Using National Cancer Database data (2004-2015), multivariable Cox regression analysis with penalized smoothing splines was performed to examine the association between treatment delay and all-cause mortality for stage I BC, LPA, and ADL. Propensity score-matched analyses compared the overall survival of patients who received "early" vs "delayed" surgery (ie, 0-30 vs 90-120 days after diagnosis) across the different histologic subtypes. RESULTS: During the study period, patients with stage I BC (n = 4947), LPA (n = 5340), and ADL (n = 6816) underwent surgery. Cox regression analysis of these cohorts showed a gradual steady increase in the hazard ratio the longer treatment is delayed. However, in propensity score-matched analyses that created cohorts of patients who underwent early and delayed surgery that were well-balanced in patient characteristics, no significant differences in 5-year survival were found between early and delayed surgery for stage I BC (87% [95% CI:77%-93%] vs 89% [95% CI: 80%-94%]), stage I LPA (73% [95% CI: 64%-80%] vs 77% [95% CI: 68%-83%]), and stage I ADL (71% [95% CI: 64%-76%] vs 69% [95% CI: 60%-76%]). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, for early-stage indolent lung tumors and part-solid ground glass lung nodules, a delay of surgery by 3-4 months after diagnosis can be considered.
Authors
Mayne, NR; Elser, H; Lin, BK; Raman, V; Liou, D; Li, X; D'Amico, TA; Jeffrey Yang, C-F
MLA Citation
Mayne, Nicholas R., et al. “The Impact of Extended Delayed Surgery for Indolent Lung Cancer or Part-Solid Ground Glass Nodules.Ann Thorac Surg, vol. 113, no. 6, June 2022, pp. 1827–34. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.05.099.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1493065
PMID
34329603
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume
113
Published Date
Start Page
1827
End Page
1834
DOI
10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.05.099