Thomas D'Amico

Overview:

Lung Cancer

1.Role of molecular markers in the prognosis and therapy of lung cancer
2.Genomic analysis lung cancer mutations


Esophageal Cancer

1.Role of molecular markers in the prognosis and therapy of esophageal cancer
2.Genomic analysis esophageal cancer mutations

Positions:

Gary Hock Distinguished Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
School of Medicine

Professor of Surgery

Surgery, Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
School of Medicine

Member of the Duke Cancer Institute

Duke Cancer Institute
School of Medicine

Education:

M.D. 1987

Columbia University

Grants:

Genetics, Inflammation & Post-op Cognitive Dysfunction

Administered By
Anesthesiology, Cardiothoracic
Awarded By
National Institutes of Health
Role
Co Investigator
Start Date
End Date

Publications:

Commentary: Trust but verify-How do we keep the faith?

Authors
Moffatt-Bruce, SD; D'Amico, TA; Weisel, RD; Sade, RM
MLA Citation
Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D., et al. “Commentary: Trust but verify-How do we keep the faith?J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, vol. 159, no. 6, June 2020, pp. 2539–40. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.10.113.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1428149
PMID
31926689
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume
159
Published Date
Start Page
2539
End Page
2540
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.10.113

National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines: Who Makes Them? What Are They? Why Are They Important?

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) is a not-for-profit alliance of 28 leading cancer centers dedicated to improving and facilitating quality, effective, efficient, and accessible cancer care so that patients can live better lives. NCCN offers a number of programs and resources to give clinicians access to tools and knowledge that can help guide decision-making in the management of cancer, including the flagship product, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®). The NCCN Guidelines provide evidence-based, consensus-driven guidance for cancer management to ensure that all patients receive preventive, diagnostic, therapeutic, and supportive services that are most likely to lead to optimal outcomes. They are intended to assist all individuals who impact decision-making in cancer care including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, payers, patients and their families, and many others. The development of the NCCN Guidelines is an ongoing and iterative process based on a critical review of the best available evidence and the consensus recommendations made by a multidisciplinary panel of oncology experts. The NCCN Guidelines are the most detailed and frequently-updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine and are the recognized standard for cancer care throughout the world. NCCN Guidelines are used by clinicians, payers and other health care decision-makers around the world to ensure delivery of high-quality, accessible, patient-centered care aimed at optimizing patient outcomes.
Authors
Pluchino, LA; D'Amico, TA
MLA Citation
Pluchino, Lenora A., and Thomas A. D’Amico. “National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines: Who Makes Them? What Are They? Why Are They Important?Ann Thorac Surg, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.03.022.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1438060
PMID
32298647
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.03.022

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 1.2020.

The NCCN Guidelines for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) address all aspects of management for NSCLC. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates in immunotherapy. For the 2020 update, all of the systemic therapy regimens have been categorized using a new preference stratification system; certain regimens are now recommended as "preferred interventions," whereas others are categorized as either "other recommended interventions" or "useful under certain circumstances."
Authors
Ettinger, DS; Wood, DE; Aggarwal, C; Aisner, DL; Akerley, W; Bauman, JR; Bharat, A; Bruno, DS; Chang, JY; Chirieac, LR; D'Amico, TA; Dilling, TJ; Dobelbower, M; Gettinger, S; Govindan, R; Gubens, MA; Hennon, M; Horn, L; Lackner, RP; Lanuti, M; Leal, TA; Lin, J; Loo, BW; Martins, RG; Otterson, GA; Patel, SP; Reckamp, KL; Riely, GJ; Schild, SE; Shapiro, TA; Stevenson, J; Swanson, SJ; Tauer, KW; Yang, SC; Gregory, K; OCN,; Hughes, M
MLA Citation
Ettinger, David S., et al. “NCCN Guidelines Insights: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 1.2020.J Natl Compr Canc Netw, vol. 17, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 1464–72. Pubmed, doi:10.6004/jnccn.2019.0059.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1424430
PMID
31805526
Source
pubmed
Published In
J Natl Compr Canc Netw
Volume
17
Published Date
Start Page
1464
End Page
1472
DOI
10.6004/jnccn.2019.0059

Impact of Surveillance After Lobectomy for Lung Cancer on Disease Detection and Survival.

INTRODUCTION:Existing guidelines for surveillance after non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment are inconsistent and have relatively sparse supporting literature. This study characterizes detection rates of metachronous and recurrent disease during surveillance with computed tomography scans after definitive treatment of early stage NSCLC. MATERIALS AND METHODS:The incidence of metachronous and recurrent disease in patients who previously underwent complete resection via lobectomy for stage IA NSCLC at a single center from 1996 to 2010 were evaluated. A subgroup analysis was used to compare survival of patients whose initial surveillance scan was 6 ± 3 months (early) versus 12 ± 3 months (late) after lobectomy. RESULTS:Of 294 eligible patients, 49 (17%) developed recurrent disease (14 local only, 35 distant), and 45 (15%) developed new NSCLC. Recurrent disease was found at a mean of 22 ± 19 months, and new primaries were found at a mean of 52 ± 31 months after lobectomy (P < .01). Five-year survival after diagnosis of recurrent disease was significantly lower than after diagnosis of second primaries (2.3% vs. 57.5%; P < .001). In the subgroup analysis of 187 patients, both disease detection on the initial scan (2% [2/94] vs. 4% [4/93]; P = .44) and 5-year survival (early, 80.8% vs. late, 86.7%; P = .61) were not significantly different between the early (n = 94) and the late (n = 93) groups. CONCLUSION:Surveillance after lobectomy for stage IA NSCLC is useful for identifying both new primary as well as recurrent disease, but waiting to start surveillance until 12 ± 3 months after surgery is unlikely to miss clinically important findings.
Authors
Mayne, NR; Mallipeddi, MK; Darling, AJ; Jeffrey Yang, C-F; Eltaraboulsi, WR; Shoffner, AR; Naqvi, IA; D'Amico, TA; Berry, MF
MLA Citation
Mayne, Nicholas R., et al. “Impact of Surveillance After Lobectomy for Lung Cancer on Disease Detection and Survival.Clinical Lung Cancer, Apr. 2020. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.cllc.2020.03.011.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439785
PMID
32376115
Source
epmc
Published In
Clinical Lung Cancer
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.cllc.2020.03.011

Commentary: Are we home yet?

Authors
MLA Citation
D’Amico, Thomas A. “Commentary: Are we home yet?J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.03.115.
URI
https://scholars.duke.edu/individual/pub1439786
PMID
32340808
Source
pubmed
Published In
The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Published Date
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.03.115